Videos


  1. Video Snapshots: Doctoral Research at F&ES

    In a series of videos, we asked several Ph.D. candidates to describe their research in just 90 seconds. These vignettes offer just a small window into the exciting research being done by our students.
  2. Spring Comes to Yale-Myers Forest

    While the coronavirus crisis has kept many F&ES students and researchers away from Yale-Myers Forest this spring, Joseph Orefice ’09 M.F., a lecturer and director of forest and agricultural operations at F&ES, takes you there in a series of videos.
  3. Time to Move Beyond Treaties: A New Framework for Sustainable Action

    At the recent conference, “Rio+20 to 2015: A New Architecture for a Sustainable World,” which was hosted by F&ES and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), top experts in climate and sustainability issues discussed what new global structures for enabling solutions might look like.
  4. High-Wire Science: Blogging from the Forest Canopy

    In the forest canopy of the Panamanian rainforest, F&ES doctoral student Kevin McLean is documenting the “canopy highways” that tree-dwelling animals use to get around. His findings may help conservationists protect species that are rarely seen and can be nearly impossible to study.
  5. F&ES Student Featured in Showtime’s “Years of Living Dangerously”

    In the new Showtime series "Years of Living Dangerously," a group of celebrities help tell the story of climate change. But the real stars of the film are the people already living with its consequences or fighting to make the world more resilient - including Brendan Edgerton M.E.M. '15 M.B.A. '15.
  6. F&ES Launches First Online Courses in Religion and Ecology

    This fall, Professors Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim will launch for the first time two online courses in the study of religion and ecology. While the courses will initially be open to Yale students only, the instructors intend to eventually make it available to a wider audience.
  7. Defending Science on the Climate War’s Front Lines

    Michael Mann (’98 PhD) didn’t intend to thrust himself into the middle of the national debate over climate change. But after he helped produce the so-called “hockey stick” graph that’s precisely where Mann found himself.