Masters Application Deadline

December 15, 2014 (priority)
New student participating in Mods
© Cara Mae Cirignano

2014 Incoming Student Profile

  • Students from 34 U.S. states & territories and 25 countries
  • 58% female, 42% male
  • 31% international
  • 16% U.S. minorities
  • Average age of students: 27 years
  • Average undergraduate GPA: 3.59
  • Average GRE scores (no minimum):
    Verbal 610/160, Quantitative 700/155, Writing 4.5
  • Average of 2-4 years of professional experience prior to enrollment

Masters Programs at F&ES

Founded in 1901, F&ES is one of Yale University’s 13 graduate and professional schools. It is the oldest professional forestry school in the nation.

F&ES offers four 2-year degree programs—Master of Environmental Management (MEM), Master of Environmental Science (MESc), Master of Forestry (MF), and Master of Forest Science (MFS). F&ES also offers two 10-month programs (MEM and MF) for mid-career professionals with at least 7 years of experience.

Areas of study include: Ecosystem Conservation and Management; Forestry, Forest Science and Forest Management; Business and the Environment; Climate Science, Adaptation and Mitigation; Energy and the Environment; Environmental Policy Analysis; Human Dimensions of Environmental Management; Sustainable Land Management; Sustainable Urban and Industrial Systems; and Water Resources Management.

Joint degree programs are available with Yale Schools of Management; Law; Divinity; Architecture; Public Health; International Development Economics; and International Relations. Joint degree programs are also available with Vermont Law School and Pace Law School, and a joint program is offered in Management with the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia.

For the 2014-2015 academic year, tuition was $36,940 with an additional $15,368 estimated for books, health insurance and living expenses.

In 2014, F&ES had approximately $4.5 million in scholarships available to award to master’s students. Scholarships are awarded based on demonstrated financial need and academic merit, and range in award availability and size. For more information on the financial aid process, please visit Financial Aid.
 
Yale F&ES Blog
FES CELEBRATES DIVERSITY WITH ITS ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL TGIF

TGIF (“Thank God I’m a Forester”) is a Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies tradition. The Friday events are hosted by the Forestry Club – a student-run group tasked with organizing FES social functions – and bring foresters together to relax, unwind, and enjoy each other’s company after a week of hard work.

On Friday, the Forestry Club hosted its annual International TGIF – an evening intended to celebrate the School of Forestry’s diverse student body (roughly 30 percent of FES students come from abroad!). Flags and photos adorned Bowers Auditorium and music played while international students prepared dishes from their home countries to share with classmates. Many countries were represented, including Japan, Kenya, Mexico, and

Professional Skills Courses at F&ES

To follow up on my post last week about one-time Technical Skills Modules, I thought I’d go ahead and tell you a little bit more about the opportunity to learn professional skills here at F&ES through one-credit courses offered each semester that aim to teach us about skills we might need in our future careers. These courses, known as Professional Skills Courses, or PSCs, here on campus, usually meet once a week during the evening, and are often taught by professionals in the field, rather than professors at the university.

This semester I’m taking a PSC taught by Kris Morico, a Global Leader of several Corporate Environmental Programs at General Electric Co., with a background in environmental engineering. The course, titled “Foundations of Environmental Leadership and Management,” is an…

Class After Class

It’s Friday and you’ve just finished and turned in your last problem set for the week, your classes are through for the day, and it’s a beautiful day outside. There isn’t much out there that would be better than taking a walk in the park, maybe running up to the top of East Rock, and grabbing a beer with some other foresters, right? What if I were to tell you that instead, a lot of people end up going to another class? One that doesn’t even count for credit, but instead you just take for “fun”?

Sounds improbable, right? The last thing anyone wants to do on a Friday afternoon is take their few free hours during the week to sit in another class.

Turns out, though, many…

Simon Queenborough - Connecting New Haven to the Tropics

The recent addition of Simon Queenborough to the F&ES faculty team is a major windfall for current and future students here at the School of Forestry.  In addition to his new position as lecturer and researcher at F&ES, Dr. Queenborough has come on board as the new director of the Tropical Resources Institute.  This diversity of roles means that students with a variety of backgrounds and interests will have the opportunity to interact with and learn from this dynamic new instructor.

This spring, Dr. Queenborough will kick off his course offerings with an introduction to tropical ecology.  As a field-based course, it will spend the two weeks of spring break in the tropics, where students will benefit directly from Dr. Queenborough’s extensive field experience and interactive…

New Student Profile: Jessica Webb

Jessica Webb is one of this year’s mid-career students at FES. Because she has been working in the environmental field for more than seven years, she will spend only a year at the school to get her MEM degree. Prior to coming to FES, she worked for a number of years in Latin America, first for a small nonprofit in Costa Rica focused on community conservation. In that area, most of the tropical forest was either privately owned or considered dangerous. Jessica worked on an educational program to make the forest more accessible, especially to young people. She also organized a community census, which helped migrant workers gain title to land, and set up a community ecotourism program.

After this, Jessica worked for the Rainforest Alliance in Costa Rica…

Share this page: