Masters Application Deadline

December 15, 2014 (priority)
New student participating in Mods
© Cara Mae Cirignano

2014 Incoming Student Profile

  • Students from 34 U.S. states & territories and 25 countries
  • 58% female, 42% male
  • 31% international
  • 16% U.S. minorities
  • Average age of students: 27 years
  • Average undergraduate GPA: 3.59
  • Average GRE scores (no minimum):
    Verbal 610/160, Quantitative 700/155, Writing 4.5
  • Average of 2-4 years of professional experience prior to enrollment

Masters Programs at F&ES

Founded in 1901, F&ES is one of Yale University’s 13 graduate and professional schools. It is the oldest professional forestry school in the nation.

F&ES offers four 2-year degree programs—Master of Environmental Management (MEM), Master of Environmental Science (MESc), Master of Forestry (MF), and Master of Forest Science (MFS). F&ES also offers two 10-month programs (MEM and MF) for mid-career professionals with at least 7 years of experience.

Areas of study include: Ecosystem Conservation and Management; Forestry, Forest Science and Forest Management; Business and the Environment; Climate Science, Adaptation and Mitigation; Energy and the Environment; Environmental Policy Analysis; Human Dimensions of Environmental Management; Sustainable Land Management; Sustainable Urban and Industrial Systems; and Water Resources Management.

Joint degree programs are available with Yale Schools of Management; Law; Divinity; Architecture; Public Health; International Development Economics; and International Relations. Joint degree programs are also available with Vermont Law School and Pace Law School, and a joint program is offered in Management with the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia.

For the 2014-2015 academic year, tuition was $36,940 with an additional $15,368 estimated for books, health insurance and living expenses.

In 2014, F&ES had approximately $4.5 million in scholarships available to award to master’s students. Scholarships are awarded based on demonstrated financial need and academic merit, and range in award availability and size. For more information on the financial aid process, please visit Financial Aid.
 
Yale F&ES Blog
Students gather on Indigenous Peoples' Day (Photo credit: Yale Native American Cultural Center).

In order to help prospective F&ES students gain a better understanding of student life on the Yale campus, we’ve decided to launch a series introducing the bevvy of student centers at the college and university open to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. This week, we outline the history and mission of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC).

Yale College graduated its first Native American student, Henry Roe Cloud of the Winnebago Tribe, in 1910. Since that time, the Native American presence has grown significantly on campus, and in 1989 the Association of Native Americans at Yale (ANAAY) was founded with the hopes of attracting more Native American professors and students to share their knowledge of their rich culture and history with the wider Yale audience. The NACC…

The Forest Dialogue Week at Yale

Every morning at 9:00, the administration emails students the calendar of events at the school for the next seven days.  A steady stream of guest speakers, informational interviews, and networking lunches vie for students’ attention.  This week’s Forest Dialogue Week is a prime example of the embarrassment of riches we constantly face when sorting out our daily schedules.

The Forest Dialogue (TFD) is an organization that facilitates discussion and collaboration across stakeholders on the most pressing local and global issues facing forests and people.  TFD Week at Yale brings together international leaders from the forest sector to address current issues in forest management and to build shared understanding and work towards collaborative solutions.  Participants in TFD include activists, industry representatives, community leaders, academic researchers, and of course students…

Liza Comita: representing women in environmental science

It’s no secret that women are under-represented in STEM fields.  The National Science Foundation reports that women comprise just over 40% of graduate students in science and technology.  However, women with a Master’s degree or higher who are actually employed in science or engineering occupations currently comprise only 30% of workers in those fields.  For this reason alone, we are excited to welcome Dr. Liza Comita as an assistant professor of tropical forest management at F&ES.  However, although Dr. Comita is an excellent role model for women pursuing STEM fields, this is far outshined by her depth of knowledge and experience, as well as the opportunities she brings for F&ES students to pursue tropical studies while at Yale.

This spring, Dr. Comita, along with Dr

F&ES Celebrates Diversity with its Annual International TGIF

TGIF (“Thank God I’m a Forester”) is a Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies tradition. The Friday events are hosted by the Forestry Club – a student-run group tasked with organizing FES social functions – and bring foresters together to relax, unwind, and enjoy each other’s company after a week of hard work.

On Friday, the Forestry Club hosted its annual International TGIF – an evening intended to celebrate the School’s diverse student body (roughly 30 percent of F&ES students come from abroad!). Flags and photos adorned Bowers Auditorium and music played while international students prepared dishes from their home countries to share with classmates. Many countries were represented, including Japan, Kenya, Mexico, and Norway –

Professional Skills Courses at F&ES

To follow up on my post last week about one-time Technical Skills Modules, I thought I’d go ahead and tell you a little bit more about the opportunity to learn professional skills here at F&ES through one-credit courses offered each semester that aim to teach us about skills we might need in our future careers. These courses, known as Professional Skills Courses, or PSCs, here on campus, usually meet once a week during the evening, and are often taught by professionals in the field, rather than professors at the university.

This semester I’m taking a PSC taught by Kris Morico, a Global Leader of several Corporate Environmental Programs at General Electric Co., with a background in environmental engineering. The course, titled “Foundations of Environmental Leadership and Management,” is an…

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