Ben Cashore

Professor, Environmental Governance & Political Science; Director of the Governance, Environment, and Markets Initiative at Yale (GEM) and Director, Program on Forest Policy and Governance

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Contact

Email:
Tel: 203 432-3009

Faculty Support
Eleanor Migliore, 203 432-5732
eleanor.migliore@yale.edu

 

Degrees

B.A., M.A., Carleton University
Ph.D., University of Toronto

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About

Benjamin Cashore is Professor of Environmental Governance & Political Science at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He is courtesy joint appointed in Yale’s Department of Political Science and is a Senior Research Fellow, Yale MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies. He is Director of the Governance, Environment and Markets (GEM) Initiative at Yale and is the Joseph C. Fox Faculty Director of the Yale International Fox Fellows Program.
Cashore’s major research interests include transnational business regulation; non-state market driven (NSMD) global governance, corporate social responsibility, the emergence of domestic and international regulatory policies; and the role of firms, non-state actors, civil society in shaping these trends. His ongoing research efforts are focused on understanding how the interaction of multiple -levels of governance, public and private, might evolve, in the global era, to produce durable global environmental governance and sustainability solutions. He pursues this approach through thematic efforts: policy change and policy learning; intervening to address “super wicked” problems; and the influence of globalization and internationalization on domestic policy processes. His substantive research interests include climate policy, deforestation, and land use change.
He is a faculty member, Center for Business and Environment at Yale; Smart Prosperity Institute Global Fellow, University of Ottawa; and Fellow, Centre for Corporate Social Responsibility, Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen, Denmark. He is a Member, Scholars Strategy Network; http://www.scholarsstrategynetwork.org/scholar/ben-cashore.
Cashore serves on the Scientific board of the International Review of Public Policy (the journal of the International Public Policy Association) and on the Editorial Board Earth System Governance journal (the flagship publication of the global Earth System Governance research alliance). He is a Lead Faculty, Earth Systems Governance Project, International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change; serves on the Steering Committee of the Environment, Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI) and the Advisory Board, Tropical Resources Institute, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Cashore was recognized in 2018 as authoring (with Bernstein) one of the most ‘influential articles’ in Regulation and Governance from 2008-2018: “Can Non-State Global Governance be Legitimate?: An Analytical Framework” from the Law and Society Program commemorating a decade of publishing of the journal. His article “Legitimacy and the Privatization of Environmental Governance: How Non-State Market-Driven (NSMD) Governance Systems Gain Rule Making Authority”, Governance Journal (2002) was selected for inclusion in Haas, Peter (ed.) The Library of Essays in International Relations (Ashgate, Aldershot, England, 2008) for being deemed one of the most “important”, “influential” and “significant” articles in the field of international relations.
He was awarded the 2014 the International Union of Forest Research Organization’s “Scientific achievement award” for his contribution to global environmental governance and policy scholarship; the 2013 “best lecturer” awarded by the graduate student body, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; the 2005 International Studies Association’s Sprout prize for Governing Through Markets (with Auld and Newsom), as the best book on international environmental policy; and the 2001 John McMenemy Prize (with Bernstein) for “Globalization, Four Paths of Internationalization, and Domestic Policy Change” as the best article to appear in the Canadian Journal of Political Science in the year 2000.