When China met East Africa at F&ES:  Learning a Global Perspective on Research

During the Alumni TGIF (“Thank Goodness I’m a Forester” event at F&ES) last October, I shared with Gao, a Ph.D. candidate from China, my interest in learning about the environmental footprint of Chinese investments overseas. Despite my passion, I had little experience in the topic at the time and had no idea where to start looking for resources. Gao immediately introduced me to Dr. Helen Gichohi, the McCluskey Fellow at F&ES, at the Alumni Event. Helen is a renowned scholar from Kenya and wildlife conservation field practitioner – also former President of African Wildlife Foundation (AWF). I expressed my interest to Helen and made quick connections with her along with two other classmates, American and Ugandan students who shared a similar passion for the subject. As our interest overlapped with…

Fuels Reduction!

When Monte Kawahara, an FES alum and forester for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) visited New Haven last fall to speak to the Fire Science and Policy class, his perspective on mitigating fire risk and battling wildfire on BLM lands in California sparked the interest of Leana Weissberg, a 2nd year Master of Environmental Science candidate. When Leana spoke with Monte after class, seeking advice on paving a career path in western forest ecology, Monte pitched an idea that would provide hands-on experience in western forest management issues: a month-long student-led trip to work on BLM lands in California.

FES students jumped at the chance to gain insight into western forest ecology issues and field experience within a federal land management agency. Four students, Emily Dolhansky (MFS ’18) Leonora…

F&ES Treks to Quito, Ecuador

During the October fall break, a group of roughly 30 students from three Yale graduate schools (FES, School of Management, and Public Health) traveled to Quito, Ecuador. The majority of these students were FES-ers, who 1) attended the UN Habitat III conference as accredited stakeholders and 2) either presented research related to urban resilience or participated in a consultancy project.

The UN Habitat III conference was a unique occurrence. It is an event that only happens every 20 years, where national and subnational governments gather to discuss urban development. In this past Habitat, the New Urban Agenda was adopted. This is a guidance document that will dictate how urbanization will occur worldwide, and encompasses many areas including but not limited to social inclusion, ending poverty, environmentally sustainable…

National Geographic: F&ES Grad Discusses China's Role in the Ivory Trade

Before graduating from F&ES last month, Gao Yufang M.E.Sc. ’14 focused his studies on the global ivory trade, with an emphasis on the complex role of his native China.

Gao — who will return to China this month, along with two African conservationists, to explore the country’s ivory markets — recently spoke with National Geographic about the complexities of the ivory market and the role of young people in curbing the slaughter of Africa’s elephants.

He also talks about why he decided to focus on this issue in the first place.

When I came to Yale in September 2012, everyone was talking about ivory trade. As a Chinese in the U.S. who understood how the conservation community in China works, I was seeing a great gap…

Sterling Memorial Library, home to the stacks.

In the Fall of 2010 I began at the Yale School of Public Health and that following spring I applied and was accepted to Yale F&ES.

From the moment I was admitted I felt like family. I went up to Admitted Students Day in the spring to test the waters of the F&ES community. I was surprised by the openness and honesty of the current students and faculty, and I was astounded by the breadth of and depth of the other admitted students who would become my future classmates. Admitted students even got to stay for the T.G.I.F. (Thank God I’m A Forester), a long tradition of good beer and good friends, sometimes themed.

That summer I shipped…

The road named after my family - where my grandparents first farm was in Monmouth, Oregon.


Happy New Year everyone! Congrats to everyone who finished their applications and may be attending grad school in 2014! Many of you have asked me during our prospective student online chats and through emails why I decided to come to F&ES, how the experience was, and what it was like to do a Joint Degree.

As you may have read, I’m originally from Salem, Oregon [west coast!]. My grandparents owned a tree farm in Monmouth, Oregon and my brother and I grew up playing in the woods and in the ponds. I did my undergraduate work at the University of Oregon and graduated in 2007 with a degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing and a minor in Environmental Studies. I had originally intended to…

Current Yale F&ES Students with Dean Tony La Viña of the Ateneo School of Government and F&ES Professor Ben Cashore.

Amidst all the madness at this year’s climate negotiations, the friendly faces of Yale delegates and F&ES alumni in the hallways of the Warsaw National Stadium are a welcome relief.  As tradition dictates, we held a TGIF (Thank God I’m a Forester) reception last Saturday to bring together Yalies and friends of Yale to share stories over drinks.

Speaking as a key note at the Yale TGIF reception, Tony La Viña (LL.M. ’92, J.S.D. ’95), dean of the Ateneo School of Government in Manila, reminisced about his time at Yale and his pathway through the climate change negotiations. La Viña has attended 15 out of 19 UNFCCC Conference of the Parties. And, the four years he took a break was during the middle of the Bush Administration, when…

With Government Shutdown Over, 'Science is (Almost) Rolling Again'

Jamie Collins ’11 M.E.Sc., who is now a graduate student in a joint program between MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, had just started blogging about a research trip to Antarctica when the government shutdown threatened to stop his work before it began.

In fact, on Oct. 8 — the day he arrived at Palmer Station on the West Antarctic Peninsula — he learned that the National Science Foundation was effectively cancelling all upcoming U.S. research activities in Antarctica.

But the last-minute resolution in Congress has salvaged the mission. On his blog today, Collins reported the good news: “Science is (almost) rolling again down here on the ice.”
The sense of relief on station is palpable — members of the various science teams are…