Diversity and the Future of the U.S. Environmental Movement

Emily Enderle, editor

Excerpt from Framing the Discussion, by Emily Enderle, Master of Environmental Management '07, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

It is an exciting time to be a member of the environmental movement in the United States. Large events and organizations, including the Super Bowl, the Oscars and Yahoo, are becoming carbon neutral. The largest global retailer, Wal-Mart, is currently going green. Mainstream magazines, including Sports Illustrated and Vanity Fair, are featuring environmentally-focused cover stories and editions. Beyond the financial incentives and the celebrity glamour associated with being green, many previously unengaged segments of the population, including religious communities, people of color and people from different socio-economic classes, are becoming increasingly interested in participating in the movement's efforts.

Currently, however, there is a lack of diversity and inclusivity in environmental institutions and our movement. This is a systemic problem. Diversity is about strengthening the movement we are dedicated to by making it resilient and capable of adapting, regardless of what we face in the future. Widespread understanding of the values that diversity can provide is essential to enhancing our collective effort and the world, yet such understanding is still absent in far too many places.

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Front Matter
01-Front-Matter.pdf
Table of Contents
02-Table-of-Contents.pdf
Foreword
03-Foreword.pdf
Enderle - Diversity
04-Enderle-Diversity.pdf
Bonta and Jordan
05-Bonta-and-Jordan.pdf
Park
06-Park.pdf
Marcus
07-Marcus.pdf
Klingle
08-Klingle.pdf
Wilson
09-Wilson.pdf
Garcia
10-Garcia.pdf
Ringo
11-Ringo.pdf
Harper
12-Harper.pdf
YoungBear-Tibbetts
13-YoungBear.pdf
Cook
14-Cook.pdf
Hannigan
15-Hannigan.pdf
Perera
16-Perera.pdf
Henderson
17-Henderson.pdf
Giller
18-Giller.pdf
Concluding Thoughts
19-Concluding-Thoughts.pdf
Publication Series / Environmental Politics and Management / Diversity and the Future of the U.S. Environmental Movement