Speakers 2012


Colin Beavan

No Impact Project

Live in person, April 11th, 6:00pm, Kroon Hall, Rm 321.

Colin Beavan is a former communications consultant for nonprofits turned book writer, blogger, and activist. In 2006, his No Impact Man experiment exploded in the media after being featured in the New York Times, and he has since come to be considered one of the spokespeople for the environmental movement. He writes and administers the provocative environmental blog noimpactman.typepad.com, which has become a meeting point for discussion of environmental issues from a “deep green” perspective. He is an advisor to NYU’s Sustainability Task Force, board member of Transportation Alternatives and advisor to Just Food. He was named one of MSN’s Ten Most Influential Men of 2007, one of Elle Magazine’s 2008 Eco-Illuminators, and his blog was named one of the world’s top 15 environmental websites by Time Magazine.

Visit noimpactproject.org for more on Colin and the No Impact Project.


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Laura Bozzi

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Laura Bozzi is a doctoral candidate at Yale University's School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. With grounding in institutional theory and public policy scholarship, her research focuses on the history of policy change and political conflict surrounding mountaintop removal and surface coal mining in central Appalachia. In all her work, she looks to uncover the historical drivers to environmental problems and to identify strategies for achieving durable solutions.


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Roger Cohn

Moderating a discussion after the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Editor, Yale Environment 360

Roger Cohn is the editor of Yale Environment 360, an award-winning online magazine focusing on global environmental issues that is published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has emerged as a leading international source of reporting, analysis, opinion, and discussion on the environment, with more than 2 million visitors in the last year in 219 countries and territories. Cohn developed this pioneering Web publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and it has received widespread recognition and numerous honors, including the National Magazine Award for Digital Media for Best Video and the Online Journalism Award for Best Specialty Site. Yale Environment 360 also co-produced and exclusively featured The Warriors of Qiugang, a video about a Chinese village’s battle against a polluting chemical plant that was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and showed at EFFY 2011.

Cohn formerly served as editor-in-chief of Mother Jones and executive editor of Audubon, revitalizing both magazines. Prior to that, he was a staff writer with The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was among the first U.S. journalists to establish an environmental beat. His writing on the environment and other issues has appeared in various publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and Outside. A graduate of Yale College, he has been an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and has served as a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and lectured at various universities, including Columbia, Stanford, and New York University.


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Sir Peter Crane FRS

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and Professor of Botany.

Moderating a discussion after the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dean Crane is the Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is known internationally for his work on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was Director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the Museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today comprise the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was Director of The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation and public programs. Professor Crane was elected to the Royal Society – the UK academy of sciences in 1998. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the German Academy Leopoldina.  He was knighted in the UK for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. 

Professor Crane currently serves on the Boards of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S., the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.


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Gwyneth Cravens

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Gwyneth Cravens is an American novelist and journalist. To date, she has published five novels. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, where she also worked as a fiction editor, and in Harper’s Magazine, where she was an associate editor. She has contributed articles and editorials on science and other topics to Harper’s Magazine, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Her newest book, Power to Save the World: The Truth About Nuclear Energy, was released in October 2007 and argues for nuclear power as a safe energy source and an essential preventive of global warming.


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Harold Crooks

Director of Surviving Progress

Discussing the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Harold Crooks is an author and writer/producer whose award-winning and acclaimed documentary film credits include: The Corporation; Karsh Is History; Pax Americana And The Weaponization of Space; The World Is Watching; Bhopal: The Search for Justice; and the TV series Black Coffee. He is a recipient of a Genie Award of the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television; a Gold Hugo at the Chicago International Film Festival; a Leo Award for Best Screenwriter (Documentary) of the Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Foundation of B.C.; a National Documentary Film Award (Best Writing Category) at 1996 Hot Docs!; a Writers Guild of Canada Top Ten Awards finalist; a Commonwealth Fellowship, India; and a Fund for Investigative Journalism (Washington, DC) travel grant.


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Eric Desatnik

Exec Producer of The Whale and co-founder of the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY)

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Eric Desatnik currently manages communications for the international wildlife conservation organization, WildAid. Prior to joining WildAid, Eric Desatnik managed corporate sustainability initiatives at a Texas-based real estate development firm, worked on a team to "green" Yale's Athletics Department at the University's Office of Sustainability, and founded the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY). For his work on EFFY, he was named one of Variety's "Standout Students" of 2010. His Communications experience includes a Junior Publicist position at BWR Public Relations, coordinating campaigns for clients including Brad Pitt, Adam Sandler, and Reese Witherspoon. He also worked at Management 360, a top tier talent management company, and in the marketing department of George Magazine. Eric holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from F&ES and is certified as a LEED Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council.


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Cara Donovan

CitySeed

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Cara Donovan is currently serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA at CitySeed. As the Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator she works with CitySeed and other New Haven community partners to ensure that low-income communities of New Haven receive better access to healthy food information, higher intakes of fresh fruits and vegetables and easier access to those foods. She is focusing on increasing SNAP enrollment for eligible New Haven residents and encouraging those SNAP dollars to be used on healthy, local food. Donovan is also working on creating sustainability for CitySeed through fund development and grant writing. She graduated from Connecticut College in 2008 where she co-chaired Sprout, the student run organic garden for 3 years. She is a native Rhode Islander but has lived in New Haven for most of the past 4 years. Donovan also worked as a Health Education intern for Rainforest Flow in the native community of Tayakome, Peru in 2010, planning and facilitating experimental gardens with women.


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Jeffrey Flocken

Director, the International Fund for Animal Welfare

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeffrey Flocken is the DC Office Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare where he leads the organization’s team of legislative professionals advocating for U.S. policy initiatives on behalf of wildlife conservation and animal welfare, including efforts on behalf of species such as whales, elephants, and lions. Before this appointment, Flocken worked for five years as an International Affairs Specialist in the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Division of International Conservation, where he focused on international species conservation policy, outreach, and global conservation grant programs. Flocken has served as a consultant on numerous movies, books and television shows addressing wildlife conservation topics. Flocken currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Jaguar Conservation Fund, and the Steering Committee for the IUCN Tapir Specialist Group. Flocken is also the founder and Board co-Chair of the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders initiative which mentors and provides campaign training for up-and-coming leaders in the wildlife field. He is also the coauthor of the book Wildlife Heroes, published by Running Press in March 2012.


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Paul Gallay

President of Riverkeeper

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Paul Gallay is an attorney, educator and non-profit executive working to protect community character and improve environmental sustainability. After a brief stint in private law practice, Gallay served for a dozen years in the New York State Attorney General’s Environmental Protection Bureau and at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, helping to close Fresh Kills landfill, raise standards at NYC wastewater treatment plants and bring hundreds of corporate and government polluters to justice. After leaving public service, Gallay spent over a decade as an executive in the land conservation movement in New York and Maine, protecting thousands of acres of sensitive land, expanding the constituency for land conservation and promoting sustainable development practices. Now, as President of Riverkeeper, Gallay fights for a cleaner Hudson and safer drinking water for over nine million New Yorkers. Gallay received degrees from Williams College and Columbia Law School. He was a visiting professor of environmental studies at Williams from 2004 to 2007. He lives in Ossining, New York.


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Aaron Gerow

Assoc. Professor of Film Studies and East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Aaron Gerow arrived at Yale in January 2004 and teaches undergraduate courses in Japanese cinema, introduction to film, close analysis of film, and film genre, as well as graduate seminars on Japanese film and cultural theory. He received a MFA in film studies from Columbia University in 1987, a MA in Asian Civilizations from the University of Iowa in 1992, and a PhD in Communication Studies from Iowa in 1996. He spent nearly 12 years in Japan working for the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival and teaching at Yokohama National University and Meiji Gakuin University. He has published numerous articles in English, Japanese and other languages on such topics as Japanese early cinema, film theory, contemporary directors, film genre, censorship, Japanese manga, and cinematic representations of minorities. His book on Kitano Takeshi was published by the BFI in 2007, A Page of Madness came out from the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan in 2008, and Visions of Japanese Modernity: Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925, was published in 2010 (the Japanese version will be coming out from the University of Tokyo Press). He also co-authored the Research Guide to Japanese Film Studies with Abe Mark Nornes (Center for Japanese Studies, 2009).


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Fredrik Gertten

Director of Big Boys Gone Bananas!* and Bananas!*

Discussing his film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Fredrik Gertten is an award winning director and journalist based in Malmö, Sweden. In 1994 he founded the production company WG Film. Before he worked as a foreign correspondent and columnist for radio, TV and press in Africa, Latin America, Asia and around Europe. Today he combines film making with a role as a creative producer on WG Film – famous for local stories with a global understanding, with several films catching the identity and transformation of his hometown. Featuring international stars like footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic in True Blue - The Way Back and architect Santiago Calatrava in The Socalist, the Architect and the Twisted Tower, among others. Dole Food company made his film BANANAS!* controversial by suing the company, producer and director. The fight for the film and freedom of speech won international recognition. In Sweden awarded with several prices including the Anna Politkovskaya freedom of speech award.


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Andrew Grace

Director of Eating Alabama

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Andrew Beck Grace was born and raised in north Alabama. He is an independent documentary filmmaker whose films have aired on Public Television stations and at film festivals across the country. He received an MA in American Studies from the University of Wyoming where he made his first documentary feature about the reenactments of Custer’s Last Stand in southern Montana. After a few years in the West, making films, freelancing for magazines and working as a producer for NPR News, he moved back to his home state to tell stories about the Deep South. At The University of Alabama he teaches and oversees a unique interdisciplinary social justice documentary program called Documenting Justice, and was recently named by The Oxford American one of the “Most Creative Teachers in the South.” In 2009 he was invited to attend the CPB/PBS Producers Academy at WGBH. He's also a writer whose nonfiction has been nominated for a Puschcart Prize.


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Ronald Gregg

Senior Lecturer and Programming Director, Film Studies

Moderating a discussion after the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Ron Gregg is Senior Lecturer and Programming Director in the Film Studies Program. As a Senior Lecturer, he teaches courses on queer cinema (both Hollywood and avant-garde), classical Hollywood, and the impact of globalization and digital technology on recent Hollywood film. As Programming Director, he organizes an annual series of campus visits and workshops by filmmakers and scholars and also works with other FSP faculty to organize major film conferences and other events. Before joining the Yale faculty, he taught film history at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, St. Cloud State University, and Duke University. He has published articles on topics ranging from MGM’s management of the image of its 1920s gay star William Haines to queer representation in the competing videos produced during Oregon's 1992 anti-gay rights ballot measure campaign. He has also curated film and video programming for the Chicago Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, the South African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, Chicago's Gerber-Hart Gay and Lesbian Library, and the University of Chicago Lesbian and Gay Studies Project. He received his Ph.D. in Cinema Studies from the University of Oregon.


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John Grim

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

John Grim is currently a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges.  He is Coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions.  In that series he edited Indigenous Traditions and Ecology: the Interbeing of Cosmology and Community (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include: The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” John is also President of the American Teilhard Association.


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Lori Gruen

Chair and Professor of Philosophy, and Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Lori Gruen has been involved in animal issues as a writer, teacher, and activist for over 25 years. Her relationships with scholars thinking about animals, activists working to protect animals, and, perhaps most importantly, with many different animals, uniquely inform her perspective on how we need to rethink our engagement with other animals.  

Gruen is trained as a philosopher and works broadly on topics in practical ethics and political philosophy.  She has taught at the University of Colorado, the University of British Columbia, Lafayette College, the University of North Carolina, Stanford University, New York University, and Wesleyan University. She has published and lectured widely on topics in animal ethics, including the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the Moral Status of Non-Human Animals and the illustrated book Animal Liberation: A Graphic Guide (with Peter Singer and artist David Hines). She is currently working on a book exploring human relations to captive chimpanzees which draws lessons from the lives of some of the chimpanzees she has come to know, respect, and love.
lorigruen.com


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Maria Gunnoe

Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Maria Gunnoe is a community outreach and Issue organizer for OVEC and a life-long resident of Southern West Virginia who has experienced the destruction of mountaintop removal first-hand. Her family home place, where she currently resides, has sustained repeated flood damage caused by run-off from a nearby valley fill. She has traveled extensively nationwide to speak about the dire situation in Appalachian coalfields and is encouraging Americans to help protect Appalachian communities and our nation’s oldest mountains. Gunnoe has successfully stopped MTR operation near her home in 2007 and again in 2012 saving 100's of acres of mountain peaks and miles of streams. She’s appeared in several documentaries, including Burning the Future, Coal in America which focuses on her community organizing, Dirty Business, and most recently The Last Mountain, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival; Gunnoe attended and spoke at the premier. Gunnoe has also been featured in major newspaper articles including the Washington Post, NY Times, Time, and More Magazine. In July 2006, Gunnoe was featured in Oprah’s magazine—“O.” She is a 2006 recipient of the Joe Calloway Award for Civic Courage created by the Washington DC-based Shafeek Nader Trust for The Community.  She received the Rain Forest Action Network’s David vs. Goliath award for her efforts to create a sustainable world.  In March 2008, Gunnoe was selected as Sierra club's law program hero. In April 2009, Gunnoe was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. On February 28, 2010 she received the David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award from the Land, Air, Water Association, the nation's oldest student environmental law society, for her work to end mountaintop removal mining. Gunnoe also serves on the board of directors of SouthWings, a non-profit organization that provides free over-flights of mountaintop removal sites and other environmental disasters such as the Gulf oil spill. www.ohvec.org


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Bill Haney

Director of The Last Mountain.

Update: Bill Haney can no longer join us for the showing of The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Bill Haney has written, produced and directed award winning documentary and narrative features for ten years. He is co-founder of Uncommon Productions. His most recent feature documentary, The Price of Sugar, which he wrote, produced and directed, was short-listed for an Academy Award, nominated for the NAACP’s Image Award and was the recipient of numerous other honors, including the Gabriel Award and the Audience Award at South by Southwest. The documentary A Life Among Whales, which he directed and produced, takes a look at one man’s lifelong passion for the wild and won numerous awards including a Silver Hugo and the Earthwatch Film Award.

In addition to filmmaking, Haney is founder of the eco-housing startup Blu Homes, using advanced technology to make housing greener, healthier and more affordable.  He is also chairman of World Connect, a non-profit supporting programs to help women and children in 400 developing world villages.


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William Kelly

Professor of Anthropology and Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Kelly is a noted authority on the social and historical anthropology of Japan. Kelly has focused much of his research in the last two decades on regional agrarian societies in Japan. After earning a B.A. in Anthropology from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in Sociocultural Anthropology from Brandeis University, Kelly joined the faculty at Yale in 1980. He has served as Chair for the Department of Anthropology, Chair for the Council on East Asian Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies for East Asian Studies. Kelly is currently a member of the executive committees for the Council on East Asian Studies, Council on Southeast Asia Studies and Program on Agrarian Studies. He is also a member of the steering committee of Yale College and a faculty affiliate of the Peabody Museum of Natural History. His professional affiliations include membership in the American Anthropological Association, American Ethnological Society, Society for Cultural Anthropology, Association for Asian Studies and the editorial board of the Journal of Japanese Studies.


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Dan Klau

Attorney

Discussing the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dan Klau is an attorney in the Hartford office of McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter. He graduated from Boston University School of Law, summa cum laude, in 1990, and then began his career as a law clerk to Chief Justice Ellen A. Peters of the Connecticut Supreme Court. His practice focuses on appellate and First Amendment (particularly media law) litigation. He also litigates a broad variety of complex disputes involving commercial and private parties in federal and state trial courts. As an appellate advocate, he has represented clients in the United State Supreme Court, the United States Courts of Appeal for the First and Second Circuits, and the Connecticut Supreme and Appellate courts. His media practice includes representing newspapers and other publishing entities in defamation matters and cases seeking access to court proceedings and files.

Dan is also an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where he teaches privacy law. He is frequently quoted on First Amendment and privacy issues, is the author of numerous articles and columns on appellate practice and First Amendment issues, and is a frequent lecturer on these topics. Dan is currently president of Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. He has received numerous awards for his work on behalf of government access and transparency, including the Society of Professional Journalist's 2009 Helen M. Loy Freedom of Information Award, the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information's 2007 Stephen Collins Award and the Connecticut Bar Association's 2007 "Pro Bono" Award. He has been recognized as a Connecticut and New England "Super Lawyer" in the area of appellate practice. Dan is a James W. Cooper Fellow of the Connecticut Bar Foundation and is a past member of the Board of Directors of the Hartford County Bar Association. Dan was the keynote speaker at the Freedom of Information Commission's 2009 Annual Conference.


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Roy Lee

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Roy Lee  joined the United Nations in 1967 in the Division of Human Rights. In 1972, he joined the law of the sea Secretariat and became Secretary of the First Committee of the Third U.N. Conference on the Law of the Sea. In 1982, upon completion of his assignment, he moved to the Office of Legal Affairs as Principal Legal Officer in the Office of the Legal Counsel.  He is currently Director of the Codification Division in the Office of Legal Affairs and also acts as Secretary of the International Law Commission and of the Sixth (Legal) Committee of the General Assembly and of three other law-making bodies.

He has taught international law and relations in various law schools in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the United States and Canada. He is co-author of a "Manual on Space Law"  and co-editor of "New Directions in the Law of the Sea" and has published some 30 articles on law of the sea, human rights, nuclear energy, settlement of disputes, ocean management, humanitarian law, terrorism and the question of war crimes and crimes against humanity.  In 1997, he co-edited a book on "Increasing the Effectiveness of the International Court of Justice".

Lee holds a law degree from China, earned a Master of Law in International Law from McGill University in 1962, and received a Ph.D in International Law from the University of London in 1967.


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Kelly McMasters

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Kelly McMasters is the author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town. The book was listed as one of Oprah's top 5 summer memoirs and is the basis for the documentary film The Atomic States of America, playing at EFFY 2012 and a 2012 Sundance selection. Her essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post Magazine, River Teeth: A Journal of Narrative Nonfiction, Newsday, Time Out New York, and MrBellersNeighborhood.com, among others. She holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia's School of the Arts and is the recipient of a Pushcart nomination and an Orion Book Award nomination. McMasters teaches at mediabistro.com and in the undergraduate writing program and Journalism Graduate School at Columbia University. She splits her time between Manhattan and northeast Pennsylvania, where she lives with her two sons and husband, the painter Mark Milroy.


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Alan Mikhail

Assistant Professor, History, Yale University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Alan Mikhail is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science and medicine.

His first book, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History (Cambridge University Press, 2011), won the 2009-11 Roger Owen Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association and the 2011 Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Publication from Yale University and was named a book of the year by Ahram Online.

Professor Mikhail is currently writing a book about the changing relationships between humans and animals in Ottoman Egypt and also completing an edited volume on the environmental history of the Middle East, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2013.


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Barry Muchnick

Discussing the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Barry Muchnick is an environmental historian whose research and teaching revolve around the idea that history looks very different when considered in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together. Currently teaching at Quinnipiac University, Barry recently completed his dissertation, “Nature’s Republic: Fresh Air Reform and The Moral Ecology of Citizenship in Turn of the Century America” in a joint Ph.D. program of his own design between Yale’s History Department and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to arriving in New Haven, Barry worked on a multi-year grizzly bear census in Montana’s Glacier National Park, radio-tracked desert tortoises in Nevada’s Mojave Desert for the U.S.G.S. Biological Survey, and led field excursions for the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota. His interest in the cultural and historical dimensions of natural resources led him from the outdoors to the archives, where he continues to study the intersection of social justice and nature conservation. He has lectured widely on British landscape painting and environmental ethics; environmental citizenship; the interconnections of science, technology, and sentiment; nature and national identity; and natural disaster.


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Jeremy Oldfield

Interim Farm Coordinator, Yale Sustainable Food Project

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeremy Oldfield’s food and farming experience includes growing specialty greens at a six acre organic operation in Petaluma, California, and fermenting locally grown vegetables at the Cultured Pickle Shop in Berkeley, California. He spent 2006 working for Eliot Coleman at his Four Season Farm in Maine. Most recently, he founded The Freelance Farmers, a company that helped both schools and homeowners install productive vegetable gardens. Jeremy enjoys teaching urban dwellers about the delights of soil ecology and food production. He graduated from Williams College in 2005 with a degree in American Studies, and completed his MFA in Writing and Literature at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


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Ann Powers

Associate Professor of Law, Pace Law School

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Ann Powers is a faculty member of the Center for Environmental Legal Studies, where she teaches a range of environmental courses focusing on the law of oceans & coasts, international environmental law, UN diplomacy and water quality. Her scholarship includes emerging ocean issues and water pollution trading programs, among other subjects. Professor Powers’ recent work has focused particularly on ocean and international issues, and she has worked with United Nations Environment Program projects, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Commission on Environmental Law and its Law Academy.  She chairs the Land-based Pollution Subcommittee of the Commission’s Oceans, Coasts & Coral Reefs Specialist Group.

Until joining the Center in 1995, she was vice president and general counsel of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, a major regional non-profit environmental organization, where she supervised the Foundation’s legal work and its pollution control advocacy program. Professor Powers also served as a senior trial attorney in the Environmental Enforcement Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, handling both civil and criminal cases, and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.


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James Saiers

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Professor of Hydrology; Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Professor of Chemical Engineering

Moderating a discussion after the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Saiers studies the circulation of water and the movement of waterborne chemicals in surface and subsurface environments. One element of his research centers on quantifying the effects that interactions between hydrological and geochemical processes have on the migration of contaminants in groundwater. Another focus is on the dynamics of surface water and groundwater flow in wetlands and the response of fluid flow characteristics to changes in climate and water management practices. His work couples field observations and laboratory-scale experimentation with mathematical modeling.


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Monique Stefani

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Monique Stefani is interested in understanding issues around food security and the global food system. She completed her doctoral dissertation in sociology in December 2009 at The State University of New York, Stony Brook, studying how nations became interested in investing in the biotechnology industry in the 1970s and 1980s. She’s currently working on food security data from the Kamuli District in Uganda. She is on the New Haven Food Policy Council, working on a number of locally based food system projects, including a map of the New Haven food system. Her research concentration is in cultural theory and sociology of technology. Her goal is to situate her work in between academic research and local involvement.


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Kristin Tracz

Research and policy associate with Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED)

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Kristin Tracz joined MACED in June 2010 after finishing her Master of Environmental Management degree at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Tracz works closely on energy efficiency and renewable energy policy in Kentucky and Central Appalachia and supports the Appalachian Transition Initiative. Prior to graduate school, Tracz was a Senior Program Associate for the Blue Moon Fund in Charlottesville, Virginia, working with rural economic development projects throughout Asia. A Virginia native, with a B.A. from the University of Virginia, she is happy to be away from the cold winters of the Northeast. Visit MACED.org and http://www.appalachiantransition.org.


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Mary Evelyn Tucker

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School and the Department of Religious Studies. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. She is also Research Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard. She is the author of Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase (Open Court Press, 2003), Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism (SUNY, 1989) and The Philosophy of Qi (Columbia University Press, 2007). She co-edited Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994), Buddhism and Ecology (Harvard, 1997), Confucianism and Ecology (Harvard, 1998), and Hinduism and Ecology (Harvard, 2000) and When Worlds Converge (Open Court, 2002). With Tu Weiming she edited two volumes on Confucian Spirituality (Crossroad, 2004). She also co-edited a Daedalus volume titled Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change? (2001). She edited several of Thomas Berry’s books: Evening Thoughts (Sierra Club Books and University of California Press, 2006), The Sacred Universe (Columbia University Press, 2009), Christian Future and the Fate of Earth (Orbis Book, 2009). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). She served on the International Earth Charter Drafting Committee from 1997-2000 and is a member of the Earth Charter International Council. B.A. Trinity College, M.A. SUNY Fredonia, M.A. Fordham University, PhD Columbia University.


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Allison D. Tuttle

Staff Veterinarian & Director of Animal Care, Mystic Aquarium

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dr. Allison Tuttle graduated with a DVM from North Carolina State University in 2002. Following graduation, Allison completed a 2-year Internship in Aquatic Animal Medicine at Mystic Aquarium. Allison also completed a Residency in Zoological Medicine with an Aquatic Health Management focus at North Carolina State University in 2007. During the residency, Allison was part of a team providing medical care to the 3 North Carolina Aquariums, the North Carolina Zoological Park, the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Hospital and for stranded marine mammals along the North Carolina coast. Allison returned to Mystic Aquarium in fall 2007 to assume the role of Staff Veterinarian and Director of Animal Care and enjoys providing medical care to the wide variety of species housed at the Aquarium. She is also involved with clinical research pertaining to the health of our animal collection. Allison’s main medical interests relate to infectious disease and preventative medicine.


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David Watts

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Yale University

Hosting a question and answer session after the film Chimpanzee, April 15th, 11:00am, Bow-Tie Criterion Cinema

Professor David Watts’ research speciality is the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates. He has done fieldwork in Panama (behavior of white-faced capuchin monkeys), Rwanda (behavioral ecology of mountain gorillas), and Uganda (behavioral ecology of chimpanzees). He was the Director of the Karisoke Research Centre in Rwanda for two years. In collaboration with Dr. Jeremiah Lwanga and Dr. John Mitani, he has maintained a research project on chimpanzee behavior at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda since 1995. He teaches courses on primate behavior and ecology, evolutionary approaches to human behavior, cognitive ethology, nonhuman primate models for human evolution, hunter-gatherer societies, and primate conservation. His graduate students have done research on a wide range of topics, including chimpanzee behavior; behavioral ecology of red colobus monkeys, black-and-white colobus monkeys, and spider monkeys; positional behavior of old world monkeys; chimpanzee behavioral endocrinology; the evolutionary genetics of gorillas; and the population genetics and mating system of sifakas.


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Click here to see the speakers from EFFY 2011


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