NEW WEBSITE!


We have moved our online home! Please go to HERE to see our new website and EFFY 2014 updates.


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We have moved our online home! Please go to HERE to see our new website and EFFY 2014 updates.


NEW WEBSITE!


We have moved our online home! Please go to HERE to see our new website and EFFY 2014 updates.


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2013 Awards


 

 

2013 ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL AT
YALE BESTOWS TOP HONORS TO
A RIVER CHANGES COURSE

Film lineup for 5th annual student-run festival chosen from 300 submissions, 40 countries


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - April 23, 2013
CONTACT: Richard Miron: 203.936.9819 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

To download this press release, click here.

NEW HAVEN, CT [April 23, 2013] - Today, the 2013 Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY) announced the winners of the 5th annual student-run film festival, which concluded last week. A jury comprised of Yale students, alumni, and faculty awarded the documentary, A River Changes Course, the top prize for a feature film. From more than 300 submissions from over 40 countries, EFFY organizers chose to screen some of the year’s most innovative, cutting-edge films that raise awareness of current environmental and social issues. 

Directed by Kalyanee Mam, A River Changes Course takes the audience to the remote jungles and floating cities of the Cambodian countryside to the bustling garment factories of modern Phnom Penh, tracing the story of a country torn between the rural present and an ominous industrial future.

"I was very impressed by the diverse films and voices represented at EFFY this year, and by the festival programmers who themselves are leaders in the environmental movement,” said Mam of her experience at EFFY. “EFFY is a true platform for sharing stories and discussing the many environmental issues facing our world today." 

EFFY, housed within the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, showcased 10 feature films and 14 shorts from April 8 to April 14 in venues across New Haven, CT.  All screenings were followed by panel discussions with filmmakers, Yale faculty, and other experts.

The EFFY Audience Award, as determined by ballots distributed to filmgoers, went to GMO OMG, directed by Jeremy Seifert. The film, which had its U.S. Premiere at EFFY, tells the story of a father’s discovery of GMOs in relationship to his three young children and the world around him.

The jury also honored the short film, Redemption, directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill, which follows New York City's canners -- the men and women who survive by redeeming bottles and cans they collect from curbs, garbage cans and apartment complexes.

Other highlights of the festival included the first annual EFFY Young Filmmakers and Young Photographers Competition, the world premiere of Gold Fever, directed by Andrew Sherburne, JT Haines and Tommy Haines, and a special screening of Fox Searchlight’s The East directed by Zal Batmanglij and starring Brit Marling, Ellen Page, and Alexander Skarsgård.

"EFFY 2013 was the most successful yet,” said Dean Peter Crane, Dean of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. "Now in its fifth year, EFFY has become one of the best ways that Yale reaches out into the broader New Haven community."

Major sponsors of the 2013 festival include the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, The Study at Yale Hotel, Films at the Whitney, the Class of 1980 Fund, and Phoenix Press. 


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Awards 2012



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The 2013 EFFY Jury

 

Caitlin Cromwell

Yale College Student

Caitlin is in her sophomore year as a Yale undergraduate. She was raised in Baltimore, Maryland, alongside two siblings, four dogs, two cats, a whole host of chickens, and a swarm of honeybees. An English major, Caitlin reads a lot of Wordsworth, and agrees with him when he says that "great Nature...exists in works of mighty Poets."

 

Jared Gilbert

Yale Divinity School, Master's Student

Jared Gilbert is a Master of Divinity candidate (2012) at Yale Divinity School (YDS), where he is the current student body president. He is preparing for urban ministry in Brooklyn as a pastor with the United Church of Christ. Advocacy for environmental causes has been a part of his professional, personal and academic life, as Communications Manager for a green architecture firm, advocacy against environmental racism, and exploration of ecological ethics and environmental theologies through study at YDS.



Ronald Gregg

Film Studies Program, Senior Lecturer and Programming Director

Ron Gregg is Director of Film Programming at the Whitney Humanities Center and Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, American Studies, and LGBT Studies at Yale. Before coming to Yale, he taught at Northwestern, Duke, the University of Chicago, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Gregg is a film curator, who has programmed special events for film festivals in Chicago, San Francisco, Johannesburg, London, and elsewhere, and in a past life, he was a digital video artist, producing work that was screened in the US and Europe.

 

Vanessa Lamers

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies / School of Public Health, Master's Student

Vanessa Lamers is currently pursuing a Joint Master of Public Health and Master of Forestry & Environmental Studies degree at Yale. Her current research involves studying the environmental and human health impacts of shale gas development, a portion of which is an analysis of if environmental documentaries such as "Gasland" portray scientific arguments properly. She works at the Yale Art Gallery, where she engages people of all ages (3-99) with imagery and the arts. She also serves on the board of the New Haven Land Trust, and is the Community Outreach Chair for the non-profit Slow Food Shoreline. Vanessa grew up in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, where she developed her love for all things environmental.

 

Will Minter

Graduate and Student Professional School, Master's Student

Will is a master's student from the UK studying East Asian studies, with a focus on Ancient Chinese literature. He loves nature, and enjoys identifying plants and birds. Before coming to Yale he was a teacher for three years, and became interested in how to reduce waste in schools and how to avoid hypocrisy when teaching about the environment.

 

Barry Muchnick

Quinnipiac University, Professor; School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Alum

Barry Muchnick is an environmental historian whose research and teaching revolve around the idea that history looks very different when considered in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together. Currently teaching at Quinnipiac University, Barry recently completed his dissertation, “Nature’s Republic: Fresh Air Reform and The Moral Ecology of Citizenship in Turn of the Century America” in a joint Ph.D. program of his own design between Yale’s History Department and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He has lectured widely on British landscape painting and environmental ethics; environmental citizenship; the interconnections of science, technology, and sentiment; nature and national identity; and natural disaster.

 

Annie O’Sullivan

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master's Student

Annie O'Sullivan is working towards her master's degree in Environmental Management at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES). She graduated from Williams College in 2007, where she studied biology with a focus on evolutionary ecology. Annie is most interested in environmental education at the high school level. Prior to attending F&ES, she worked for Lava Lake Lamb, a sheep ranch with a focus on conservation in Central Idaho.

 

Scott Rumage

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, IT Support Technician

Scott Rumage became fixated with films when his grandmother took him to see Gigi in 1982. After getting fed up with his parents' small tv & horrible sound, he re-wired their house for a laserdisc player and surround sound in 1989. His large collection of laserdiscs, VHS tapes, DVDs, HD-DVDs, & Blurays (he totally skipped betamax) is arranged by his librarian husband, Allen Townsend, in Library of Congress Format, and is managed by their miniature piebald daschund, Dashelle. When he isn't watching movies, he can be found pickling, canning, knitting, scuba diving, sous viding, gardening, composting, or completely geeking out.

 

Rachael Styer

Yale College Student

Rachael Styer is a senior Environmental Studies major at Yale College with a concentration in environmental history and policy. She has focused her research on agricultural policy history, specifically in Lancaster County, PA, and hopes to one day have a positive impact on farmland preservation and agricultural laws. In her free time she enjoys LA Times crossword puzzles, watching entire series of TV comedies and spending time with her friends and family.

 

Tara Varghese

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master's Student

Tara Varghese is in her second year at F&ES, studying water quality and resource management. She grew up in Southeast Asia and has gained a broad perspective on natural resource issues ranging from the harsh realities faced by some communities to the hope and promise experienced by others. She received degrees in Biology and English from Case Western Reserve University, and prior to arriving at Yale she worked at an environmental consulting firm in the Boston area and an NGO in Ladakh, India.

 

David Krause

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the School of Public Health, Master's Student

David Krause is a joint degree student between the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the School of Public Health. His professional and academic work focuses on the relationship between the natural environment and human health. David has long had an interest in environmental films' ability to educate and inspire.

 

Zachary Obinna-Enumah

Amistad High School, New Haven

Zachary Obinna-Enumah teaches science at Amistad High School in New Haven, CT. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in African Studies from Yale University. Zachary co-produced and edited the film, "Spirits, Camels, and Poetry," a film that explores one Tanzanian man's maternal history as rooted in poetry and which premiered at the Zanzibar Film Festival in 2010. He is currently working on the FLIPPED classroom model to bring more videos and technology into his high school science classrooms.

Click here to see the jury panel from last year's festival.


Speakers 2012


 

Colin Beavan

No Impact Project

Live in person, April 11th, 6:00pm, Kroon Hall, Rm 321.

Colin Beavan is a former communications consultant for nonprofits turned book writer, blogger, and activist. In 2006, his No Impact Man experiment exploded in the media after being featured in the New York Times, and he has since come to be considered one of the spokespeople for the environmental movement. He writes and administers the provocative environmental blog noimpactman.typepad.com, which has become a meeting point for discussion of environmental issues from a “deep green” perspective. He is an advisor to NYU’s Sustainability Task Force, board member of Transportation Alternatives and advisor to Just Food. He was named one of MSN’s Ten Most Influential Men of 2007, one of Elle Magazine’s 2008 Eco-Illuminators, and his blog was named one of the world’s top 15 environmental websites by Time Magazine.

Visit noimpactproject.org for more on Colin and the No Impact Project.


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Laura Bozzi

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Laura Bozzi is a doctoral candidate at Yale University's School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. With grounding in institutional theory and public policy scholarship, her research focuses on the history of policy change and political conflict surrounding mountaintop removal and surface coal mining in central Appalachia. In all her work, she looks to uncover the historical drivers to environmental problems and to identify strategies for achieving durable solutions.


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Roger Cohn

Moderating a discussion after the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Editor, Yale Environment 360

Roger Cohn is the editor of Yale Environment 360, an award-winning online magazine focusing on global environmental issues that is published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has emerged as a leading international source of reporting, analysis, opinion, and discussion on the environment, with more than 2 million visitors in the last year in 219 countries and territories. Cohn developed this pioneering Web publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and it has received widespread recognition and numerous honors, including the National Magazine Award for Digital Media for Best Video and the Online Journalism Award for Best Specialty Site. Yale Environment 360 also co-produced and exclusively featured The Warriors of Qiugang, a video about a Chinese village’s battle against a polluting chemical plant that was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and showed at EFFY 2011.

Cohn formerly served as editor-in-chief of Mother Jones and executive editor of Audubon, revitalizing both magazines. Prior to that, he was a staff writer with The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was among the first U.S. journalists to establish an environmental beat. His writing on the environment and other issues has appeared in various publications, including The New York Times Magazine,The Washington Post, and Outside. A graduate of Yale College, he has been an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and has served as a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and lectured at various universities, including Columbia, Stanford, and New York University.


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Sir Peter Crane FRS

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and Professor of Botany.

Moderating a discussion after the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dean Crane is the Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is known internationally for his work on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was Director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the Museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today comprise the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was Director of The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation and public programs. Professor Crane was elected to the Royal Society – the UK academy of sciences in 1998. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the German Academy Leopoldina.  He was knighted in the UK for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. 

Professor Crane currently serves on the Boards of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S., the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.


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Gwyneth Cravens

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Gwyneth Cravens is an American novelist and journalist. To date, she has published five novels. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, where she also worked as a fiction editor, and in Harper’s Magazine, where she was an associate editor. She has contributed articles and editorials on science and other topics to Harper’s Magazine, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Her newest book, Power to Save the World: The Truth About Nuclear Energy, was released in October 2007 and argues for nuclear power as a safe energy source and an essential preventive of global warming.


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Harold Crooks

Director of Surviving Progress

Discussing the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Harold Crooks is an author and writer/producer whose award-winning and acclaimed documentary film credits include: The Corporation; Karsh Is History; Pax Americana And The Weaponization of Space; The World Is Watching; Bhopal: The Search for Justice; and the TV series Black Coffee. He is a recipient of a Genie Award of the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television; a Gold Hugo at the Chicago International Film Festival; a Leo Award for Best Screenwriter (Documentary) of the Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Foundation of B.C.; a National Documentary Film Award (Best Writing Category) at 1996 Hot Docs!; a Writers Guild of Canada Top Ten Awards finalist; a Commonwealth Fellowship, India; and a Fund for Investigative Journalism (Washington, DC) travel grant.


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Eric Desatnik

Exec Producer of The Whale and co-founder of the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY)

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Eric Desatnik currently manages communications for the international wildlife conservation organization, WildAid. Prior to joining WildAid, Eric Desatnik managed corporate sustainability initiatives at a Texas-based real estate development firm, worked on a team to "green" Yale's Athletics Department at the University's Office of Sustainability, and founded the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY). For his work on EFFY, he was named one of Variety's "Standout Students" of 2010. His Communications experience includes a Junior Publicist position at BWR Public Relations, coordinating campaigns for clients including Brad Pitt, Adam Sandler, and Reese Witherspoon. He also worked at Management 360, a top tier talent management company, and in the marketing department of George Magazine. Eric holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from F&ES and is certified as a LEED Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council.


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Cara Donovan

CitySeed

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Cara Donovan is currently serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA at CitySeed. As the Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator she works with CitySeed and other New Haven community partners to ensure that low-income communities of New Haven receive better access to healthy food information, higher intakes of fresh fruits and vegetables and easier access to those foods. She is focusing on increasing SNAP enrollment for eligible New Haven residents and encouraging those SNAP dollars to be used on healthy, local food. Donovan is also working on creating sustainability for CitySeed through fund development and grant writing. She graduated from Connecticut College in 2008 where she co-chaired Sprout, the student run organic garden for 3 years. She is a native Rhode Islander but has lived in New Haven for most of the past 4 years. Donovan also worked as a Health Education intern for Rainforest Flow in the native community of Tayakome, Peru in 2010, planning and facilitating experimental gardens with women.


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Jeffrey Flocken

Director, the International Fund for Animal Welfare

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeffrey Flocken is the DC Office Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare where he leads the organization’s team of legislative professionals advocating for U.S. policy initiatives on behalf of wildlife conservation and animal welfare, including efforts on behalf of species such as whales, elephants, and lions. Before this appointment, Flocken worked for five years as an International Affairs Specialist in the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Division of International Conservation, where he focused on international species conservation policy, outreach, and global conservation grant programs. Flocken has served as a consultant on numerous movies, books and television shows addressing wildlife conservation topics. Flocken currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Jaguar Conservation Fund, and the Steering Committee for the IUCN Tapir Specialist Group. Flocken is also the founder and Board co-Chair of the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders initiative which mentors and provides campaign training for up-and-coming leaders in the wildlife field. He is also the coauthor of the book Wildlife Heroes, published by Running Press in March 2012.


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Paul Gallay

President of Riverkeeper

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Paul Gallay is an attorney, educator and non-profit executive working to protect community character and improve environmental sustainability. After a brief stint in private law practice, Gallay served for a dozen years in the New York State Attorney General’s Environmental Protection Bureau and at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, helping to close Fresh Kills landfill, raise standards at NYC wastewater treatment plants and bring hundreds of corporate and government polluters to justice. After leaving public service, Gallay spent over a decade as an executive in the land conservation movement in New York and Maine, protecting thousands of acres of sensitive land, expanding the constituency for land conservation and promoting sustainable development practices. Now, as President of Riverkeeper, Gallay fights for a cleaner Hudson and safer drinking water for over nine million New Yorkers. Gallay received degrees from Williams College and Columbia Law School. He was a visiting professor of environmental studies at Williams from 2004 to 2007. He lives in Ossining, New York.


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Aaron Gerow

Assoc. Professor of Film Studies and East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Aaron Gerow arrived at Yale in January 2004 and teaches undergraduate courses in Japanese cinema, introduction to film, close analysis of film, and film genre, as well as graduate seminars on Japanese film and cultural theory. He received a MFA in film studies from Columbia University in 1987, a MA in Asian Civilizations from the University of Iowa in 1992, and a PhD in Communication Studies from Iowa in 1996. He spent nearly 12 years in Japan working for the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival and teaching at Yokohama National University and Meiji Gakuin University. He has published numerous articles in English, Japanese and other languages on such topics as Japanese early cinema, film theory, contemporary directors, film genre, censorship, Japanese manga, and cinematic representations of minorities. His book on Kitano Takeshi was published by the BFI in 2007, A Page of Madness came out from the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan in 2008, and Visions of Japanese Modernity: Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925, was published in 2010 (the Japanese version will be coming out from the University of Tokyo Press). He also co-authored the Research Guide to Japanese Film Studies with Abe Mark Nornes (Center for Japanese Studies, 2009).


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Fredrik Gertten

Director of Big Boys Gone Bananas!* and Bananas!*

Discussing his film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Fredrik Gertten is an award winning director and journalist based in Malmö, Sweden. In 1994 he founded the production company WG Film. Before he worked as a foreign correspondent and columnist for radio, TV and press in Africa, Latin America, Asia and around Europe. Today he combines film making with a role as a creative producer on WG Film – famous for local stories with a global understanding, with several films catching the identity and transformation of his hometown. Featuring international stars like footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic in True Blue - The Way Back and architect Santiago Calatrava in The Socalist, the Architect and the Twisted Tower, among others. Dole Food company made his film BANANAS!* controversial by suing the company, producer and director. The fight for the film and freedom of speech won international recognition. In Sweden awarded with several prices including the Anna Politkovskaya freedom of speech award.


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Andrew Grace

Director of Eating Alabama

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Andrew Beck Grace was born and raised in north Alabama. He is an independent documentary filmmaker whose films have aired on Public Television stations and at film festivals across the country. He received an MA in American Studies from the University of Wyoming where he made his first documentary feature about the reenactments of Custer’s Last Stand in southern Montana. After a few years in the West, making films, freelancing for magazines and working as a producer for NPR News, he moved back to his home state to tell stories about the Deep South. At The University of Alabama he teaches and oversees a unique interdisciplinary social justice documentary program called Documenting Justice, and was recently named by The Oxford American one of the “Most Creative Teachers in the South.” In 2009 he was invited to attend the CPB/PBS Producers Academy at WGBH. He's also a writer whose nonfiction has been nominated for a Puschcart Prize.


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Ronald Gregg

Senior Lecturer and Programming Director, Film Studies

Moderating a discussion after the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Ron Gregg is Senior Lecturer and Programming Director in the Film Studies Program. As a Senior Lecturer, he teaches courses on queer cinema (both Hollywood and avant-garde), classical Hollywood, and the impact of globalization and digital technology on recent Hollywood film. As Programming Director, he organizes an annual series of campus visits and workshops by filmmakers and scholars and also works with other FSP faculty to organize major film conferences and other events. Before joining the Yale faculty, he taught film history at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, St. Cloud State University, and Duke University. He has published articles on topics ranging from MGM’s management of the image of its 1920s gay star William Haines to queer representation in the competing videos produced during Oregon's 1992 anti-gay rights ballot measure campaign. He has also curated film and video programming for the Chicago Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, the South African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, Chicago's Gerber-Hart Gay and Lesbian Library, and the University of Chicago Lesbian and Gay Studies Project. He received his Ph.D. in Cinema Studies from the University of Oregon.


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John Grim

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

John Grim is currently a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges.  He is Coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions.  In that series he edited Indigenous Traditions and Ecology: the Interbeing of Cosmology and Community (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include: The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” John is also President of the American Teilhard Association.


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Lori Gruen

Chair and Professor of Philosophy, and Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Lori Gruen has been involved in animal issues as a writer, teacher, and activist for over 25 years. Her relationships with scholars thinking about animals, activists working to protect animals, and, perhaps most importantly, with many different animals, uniquely inform her perspective on how we need to rethink our engagement with other animals.  

Gruen is trained as a philosopher and works broadly on topics in practical ethics and political philosophy.  She has taught at the University of Colorado, the University of British Columbia, Lafayette College, the University of North Carolina, Stanford University, New York University, and Wesleyan University. She has published and lectured widely on topics in animal ethics, including the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the Moral Status of Non-Human Animals and the illustrated book Animal Liberation: A Graphic Guide (with Peter Singer and artist David Hines). She is currently working on a book exploring human relations to captive chimpanzees which draws lessons from the lives of some of the chimpanzees she has come to know, respect, and love.
lorigruen.com


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Maria Gunnoe

Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Maria Gunnoe is a community outreach and Issue organizer for OVEC and a life-long resident of Southern West Virginia who has experienced the destruction of mountaintop removal first-hand. Her family home place, where she currently resides, has sustained repeated flood damage caused by run-off from a nearby valley fill. She has traveled extensively nationwide to speak about the dire situation in Appalachian coalfields and is encouraging Americans to help protect Appalachian communities and our nation’s oldest mountains. Gunnoe has successfully stopped MTR operation near her home in 2007 and again in 2012 saving 100's of acres of mountain peaks and miles of streams. She’s appeared in several documentaries, including Burning the Future, Coal in America which focuses on her community organizing, Dirty Business, and most recently The Last Mountain, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival; Gunnoe attended and spoke at the premier. Gunnoe has also been featured in major newspaper articles including the Washington Post, NY Times, Time, and More Magazine. In July 2006, Gunnoe was featured in Oprah’s magazine—“O.” She is a 2006 recipient of the Joe Calloway Award for Civic Courage created by the Washington DC-based Shafeek Nader Trust for The Community.  She received the Rain Forest Action Network’s David vs. Goliath award for her efforts to create a sustainable world.  In March 2008, Gunnoe was selected as Sierra club's law program hero. In April 2009, Gunnoe was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. On February 28, 2010 she received the David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award from the Land, Air, Water Association, the nation's oldest student environmental law society, for her work to end mountaintop removal mining. Gunnoe also serves on the board of directors of SouthWings, a non-profit organization that provides free over-flights of mountaintop removal sites and other environmental disasters such as the Gulf oil spill. www.ohvec.org


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Bill Haney

Director of The Last Mountain.

Update: Bill Haney can no longer join us for the showing of The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Bill Haney has written, produced and directed award winning documentary and narrative features for ten years. He is co-founder of Uncommon Productions. His most recent feature documentary, The Price of Sugar, which he wrote, produced and directed, was short-listed for an Academy Award, nominated for the NAACP’s Image Award and was the recipient of numerous other honors, including the Gabriel Award and the Audience Award at South by Southwest. The documentary A Life Among Whales, which he directed and produced, takes a look at one man’s lifelong passion for the wild and won numerous awards including a Silver Hugo and the Earthwatch Film Award.

In addition to filmmaking, Haney is founder of the eco-housing startup Blu Homes, using advanced technology to make housing greener, healthier and more affordable.  He is also chairman of World Connect, a non-profit supporting programs to help women and children in 400 developing world villages.


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William Kelly

Professor of Anthropology and Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Kelly is a noted authority on the social and historical anthropology of Japan. Kelly has focused much of his research in the last two decades on regional agrarian societies in Japan. After earning a B.A. in Anthropology from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in Sociocultural Anthropology from Brandeis University, Kelly joined the faculty at Yale in 1980. He has served as Chair for the Department of Anthropology, Chair for the Council on East Asian Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies for East Asian Studies. Kelly is currently a member of the executive committees for the Council on East Asian Studies, Council on Southeast Asia Studies and Program on Agrarian Studies. He is also a member of the steering committee of Yale College and a faculty affiliate of the Peabody Museum of Natural History. His professional affiliations include membership in the American Anthropological Association, American Ethnological Society, Society for Cultural Anthropology, Association for Asian Studies and the editorial board of the Journal of Japanese Studies.


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Dan Klau

Attorney

Discussing the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dan Klau is an attorney in the Hartford office of McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter. He graduated from Boston University School of Law, summa cum laude, in 1990, and then began his career as a law clerk to Chief Justice Ellen A. Peters of the Connecticut Supreme Court. His practice focuses on appellate and First Amendment (particularly media law) litigation. He also litigates a broad variety of complex disputes involving commercial and private parties in federal and state trial courts. As an appellate advocate, he has represented clients in the United State Supreme Court, the United States Courts of Appeal for the First and Second Circuits, and the Connecticut Supreme and Appellate courts. His media practice includes representing newspapers and other publishing entities in defamation matters and cases seeking access to court proceedings and files.

Dan is also an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where he teaches privacy law. He is frequently quoted on First Amendment and privacy issues, is the author of numerous articles and columns on appellate practice and First Amendment issues, and is a frequent lecturer on these topics. Dan is currently president of Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. He has received numerous awards for his work on behalf of government access and transparency, including the Society of Professional Journalist's 2009 Helen M. Loy Freedom of Information Award, the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information's 2007 Stephen Collins Award and the Connecticut Bar Association's 2007 "Pro Bono" Award. He has been recognized as a Connecticut and New England "Super Lawyer" in the area of appellate practice. Dan is a James W. Cooper Fellow of the Connecticut Bar Foundation and is a past member of the Board of Directors of the Hartford County Bar Association. Dan was the keynote speaker at the Freedom of Information Commission's 2009 Annual Conference.


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Roy Lee

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Roy Lee  joined the United Nations in 1967 in the Division of Human Rights. In 1972, he joined the law of the sea Secretariat and became Secretary of the First Committee of the Third U.N. Conference on the Law of the Sea. In 1982, upon completion of his assignment, he moved to the Office of Legal Affairs as Principal Legal Officer in the Office of the Legal Counsel.  He is currently Director of the Codification Division in the Office of Legal Affairs and also acts as Secretary of the International Law Commission and of the Sixth (Legal) Committee of the General Assembly and of three other law-making bodies.

He has taught international law and relations in various law schools in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the United States and Canada. He is co-author of a "Manual on Space Law"  and co-editor of "New Directions in the Law of the Sea" and has published some 30 articles on law of the sea, human rights, nuclear energy, settlement of disputes, ocean management, humanitarian law, terrorism and the question of war crimes and crimes against humanity.  In 1997, he co-edited a book on "Increasing the Effectiveness of the International Court of Justice".

Lee holds a law degree from China, earned a Master of Law in International Law from McGill University in 1962, and received a Ph.D in International Law from the University of London in 1967.


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Kelly McMasters

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Kelly McMasters is the author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town. The book was listed as one of Oprah's top 5 summer memoirs and is the basis for the documentary film The Atomic States of America, playing at EFFY 2012 and a 2012 Sundance selection. Her essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post Magazine, River Teeth: A Journal of Narrative Nonfiction, Newsday, Time Out New York, and MrBellersNeighborhood.com, among others. She holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia's School of the Arts and is the recipient of a Pushcart nomination and an Orion Book Award nomination. McMasters teaches at mediabistro.com and in the undergraduate writing program and Journalism Graduate School at Columbia University. She splits her time between Manhattan and northeast Pennsylvania, where she lives with her two sons and husband, the painter Mark Milroy.


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Alan Mikhail

Assistant Professor, History, Yale University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Alan Mikhail is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science and medicine.

His first book, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History (Cambridge University Press, 2011), won the 2009-11 Roger Owen Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association and the 2011 Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Publication from Yale University and was named a book of the year by Ahram Online.

Professor Mikhail is currently writing a book about the changing relationships between humans and animals in Ottoman Egypt and also completing an edited volume on the environmental history of the Middle East, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2013.


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Barry Muchnick

Discussing the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Barry Muchnick is an environmental historian whose research and teaching revolve around the idea that history looks very different when considered in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together. Currently teaching at Quinnipiac University, Barry recently completed his dissertation, “Nature’s Republic: Fresh Air Reform and The Moral Ecology of Citizenship in Turn of the Century America” in a joint Ph.D. program of his own design between Yale’s History Department and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to arriving in New Haven, Barry worked on a multi-year grizzly bear census in Montana’s Glacier National Park, radio-tracked desert tortoises in Nevada’s Mojave Desert for the U.S.G.S. Biological Survey, and led field excursions for the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota. His interest in the cultural and historical dimensions of natural resources led him from the outdoors to the archives, where he continues to study the intersection of social justice and nature conservation. He has lectured widely on British landscape painting and environmental ethics; environmental citizenship; the interconnections of science, technology, and sentiment; nature and national identity; and natural disaster.


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Jeremy Oldfield

Interim Farm Coordinator, Yale Sustainable Food Project

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeremy Oldfield’s food and farming experience includes growing specialty greens at a six acre organic operation in Petaluma, California, and fermenting locally grown vegetables at the Cultured Pickle Shop in Berkeley, California. He spent 2006 working for Eliot Coleman at his Four Season Farm in Maine. Most recently, he founded The Freelance Farmers, a company that helped both schools and homeowners install productive vegetable gardens. Jeremy enjoys teaching urban dwellers about the delights of soil ecology and food production. He graduated from Williams College in 2005 with a degree in American Studies, and completed his MFA in Writing and Literature at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


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Ann Powers

Associate Professor of Law, Pace Law School

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Ann Powers is a faculty member of the Center for Environmental Legal Studies, where she teaches a range of environmental courses focusing on the law of oceans & coasts, international environmental law, UN diplomacy and water quality. Her scholarship includes emerging ocean issues and water pollution trading programs, among other subjects. Professor Powers’ recent work has focused particularly on ocean and international issues, and she has worked with United Nations Environment Program projects, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Commission on Environmental Law and its Law Academy.  She chairs the Land-based Pollution Subcommittee of the Commission’s Oceans, Coasts & Coral Reefs Specialist Group.

Until joining the Center in 1995, she was vice president and general counsel of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, a major regional non-profit environmental organization, where she supervised the Foundation’s legal work and its pollution control advocacy program. Professor Powers also served as a senior trial attorney in the Environmental Enforcement Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, handling both civil and criminal cases, and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.


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James Saiers

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Professor of Hydrology; Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Professor of Chemical Engineering

Moderating a discussion after the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Saiers studies the circulation of water and the movement of waterborne chemicals in surface and subsurface environments. One element of his research centers on quantifying the effects that interactions between hydrological and geochemical processes have on the migration of contaminants in groundwater. Another focus is on the dynamics of surface water and groundwater flow in wetlands and the response of fluid flow characteristics to changes in climate and water management practices. His work couples field observations and laboratory-scale experimentation with mathematical modeling.


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Monique Stefani

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Monique Stefani is interested in understanding issues around food security and the global food system. She completed her doctoral dissertation in sociology in December 2009 at The State University of New York, Stony Brook, studying how nations became interested in investing in the biotechnology industry in the 1970s and 1980s. She’s currently working on food security data from the Kamuli District in Uganda. She is on the New Haven Food Policy Council, working on a number of locally based food system projects, including a map of the New Haven food system. Her research concentration is in cultural theory and sociology of technology. Her goal is to situate her work in between academic research and local involvement.


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Kristin Tracz

Research and policy associate with Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED)

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Kristin Tracz joined MACED in June 2010 after finishing her Master of Environmental Management degree at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Tracz works closely on energy efficiency and renewable energy policy in Kentucky and Central Appalachia and supports the Appalachian Transition Initiative. Prior to graduate school, Tracz was a Senior Program Associate for the Blue Moon Fund in Charlottesville, Virginia, working with rural economic development projects throughout Asia. A Virginia native, with a B.A. from the University of Virginia, she is happy to be away from the cold winters of the Northeast. Visit MACED.org and http://www.appalachiantransition.org.


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Mary Evelyn Tucker

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School and the Department of Religious Studies. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. She is also Research Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard. She is the author of Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase (Open Court Press, 2003), Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism (SUNY, 1989) and The Philosophy of Qi (Columbia University Press, 2007). She co-edited Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994), Buddhism and Ecology (Harvard, 1997), Confucianism and Ecology (Harvard, 1998), and Hinduism and Ecology (Harvard, 2000) and When Worlds Converge (Open Court, 2002). With Tu Weiming she edited two volumes on Confucian Spirituality (Crossroad, 2004). She also co-edited a Daedalus volume titled Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change? (2001). She edited several of Thomas Berry’s books: Evening Thoughts (Sierra Club Books and University of California Press, 2006), The Sacred Universe (Columbia University Press, 2009), Christian Future and the Fate of Earth (Orbis Book, 2009). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). She served on the International Earth Charter Drafting Committee from 1997-2000 and is a member of the Earth Charter International Council. B.A. Trinity College, M.A. SUNY Fredonia, M.A. Fordham University, PhD Columbia University.


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Allison D. Tuttle

Staff Veterinarian & Director of Animal Care, Mystic Aquarium

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dr. Allison Tuttle graduated with a DVM from North Carolina State University in 2002. Following graduation, Allison completed a 2-year Internship in Aquatic Animal Medicine at Mystic Aquarium. Allison also completed a Residency in Zoological Medicine with an Aquatic Health Management focus at North Carolina State University in 2007. During the residency, Allison was part of a team providing medical care to the 3 North Carolina Aquariums, the North Carolina Zoological Park, the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Hospital and for stranded marine mammals along the North Carolina coast. Allison returned to Mystic Aquarium in fall 2007 to assume the role of Staff Veterinarian and Director of Animal Care and enjoys providing medical care to the wide variety of species housed at the Aquarium. She is also involved with clinical research pertaining to the health of our animal collection. Allison’s main medical interests relate to infectious disease and preventative medicine.


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David Watts

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Yale University

Hosting a question and answer session after the film Chimpanzee, April 15th, 11:00am, Bow-Tie Criterion Cinema

Professor David Watts’ research speciality is the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates. He has done fieldwork in Panama (behavior of white-faced capuchin monkeys), Rwanda (behavioral ecology of mountain gorillas), and Uganda (behavioral ecology of chimpanzees). He was the Director of the Karisoke Research Centre in Rwanda for two years. In collaboration with Dr. Jeremiah Lwanga and Dr. John Mitani, he has maintained a research project on chimpanzee behavior at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda since 1995. He teaches courses on primate behavior and ecology, evolutionary approaches to human behavior, cognitive ethology, nonhuman primate models for human evolution, hunter-gatherer societies, and primate conservation. His graduate students have done research on a wide range of topics, including chimpanzee behavior; behavioral ecology of red colobus monkeys, black-and-white colobus monkeys, and spider monkeys; positional behavior of old world monkeys; chimpanzee behavioral endocrinology; the evolutionary genetics of gorillas; and the population genetics and mating system of sifakas.


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Click here to see the speakers from EFFY 2011


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Livestream and 2013 T-shirt


Announcements: Musicwood Livestream and the 2013 T-shirt

Friends of EFFY,

We are excited to announce that you can be part of the festival, no matter where you live! EFFY will stream our opening night film, Musicwood, beginning on Monday, April 8th at 6:30. The film will be followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Maxine Trump. Interact with us and share your questions for the panel under the Youtube comment page, or tweet at @Yale_EFFY or #EFFY5.

Click Here for the Musicwood Livestream and Panel

Keep your eyes peeled to the Huffington Post Green for coverage of the livestream and blogs featuring EFFY Directors.

We also would like to announce pre-orders for this year's EFFY festival shirt. Shirts can be picked up at any of our screenings. Order forms are here. We are sorry; we cannot offer shipping at this time.

Let the countdown to #EFFY5 begin! 


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Speakers 2013


Musicwood

Nick Colesanti

VP Corporate Operations, Martin Guitar

Nick Colesanti is Vice-President of Corporate Operations for Martin Guitar. Nick represented Martin in the Musicwood Coalition by supporting efforts to protect and sustain the natural resources of the Tongass National Rain Forest in Southeast Alaska.

Kathryn Dudley

Yale University- Moderator

Kathryn Marie Dudley is a professor of Anthropology and American Studies at Yale University. Her research focuses on changing cultures of work in the contemporary United States. She is the author of The End of the Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial America, and Debt and Dispossession: Farm Loss in America's Heartland. She has just completed a book on acoustic guitar makers in North America, which will be published in 2014.

Maxine Trump 

Filmmaker, Musicwood

Maxine Trump worked for the BBC in London for seven years as a development executive for scripted comedy. This is the first feature documentary Maxine has directed. She has directed a long running series of interstitual social issue documentaries for the TV network TNT in the USA. She has also directed a series of fifteen short interstitials for the network Sundance Channel. Her short film "Silent Life" was nominated at the IFC/ARPA Hollywood film festival. She also made a ten-minute documentary for the MSC campaign expedition to the Bering Sea, Alaska, and a seven-minute documentary for the New York City Greenmarket organization and a short documentary for the FSC. She has won BDA awards for her work in television in the USA, for National Geographic, PBS, BBC America, Animal Planet, etc. She is a freelance director having worked on numerous commercial projects for network TV living in Brooklyn, NY.

GMO OMG

Justin Freiberg 

Co-founder, Encendia Biochar and Yale Sustainable Food Project- Moderator

Justin Freiberg aims to align entrepreneurial action with the movement to produce good, fair food. Justin works with the Yale Sustainable Food Project, helping to create opportunities for Yalies to connect their studies to the world of food and agriculture. He is also a co-founder of Encendia Biochar, where he serves as Chief Marketing Officer, working with farmers, landscapers, and turf managers to build biochar products that meet their needs. Past work for Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, the Wildlife Conservation Society, Added Value, and his founding of the Urban Foodshed Collaborative trained him in connecting consumers to environmental causes through market-based solutions. He holds a MESc from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and an MA in Social Psychology from Wesleyan University. He is the 2010 recipient of the Graduate Elm-Ivy Award from Yale University and the City of New Haven.

Tara Cook-Littman

GMO Free CT

Tara Cook-Littman is a Certified Holistic Health Counselor and a former New York City Prosecutor. She is combining her advocacy skills as an attorney with her passion for health and wellness and advocating for improved food policy within the United States. Tara is leading GMO Free CT, a grass roots organization dedicated to educating consumers about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and getting legislation passed in the state of Connecticut that would mandate the labeling of products containing GMOs. Tara teaches seminars on various topics related to health, including the dangers of GMOs and how to avoid them in the marketplace .

Jeremy Seifert 

Filmmaker, GMO OMG

In 2010, Jeremy completed his debut film, DIVE!, Living Off America’s Waste. Initially made with a $200 budget, a borrowed camera, and a lot of heart, DIVE! went on to win 22 film festivals worldwide. In 2010 with the release of DIVE!, Jeremy began the production company, Compeller Pictures. He is now a filmmaker and activist, traveling the country and speaking on humanitarian and environmental issues. Jeremy’s second film, GMO OMG, tells the hidden story of the take over of our food supply by giant chemical companies, an agricultural crisis that has grown into a cultural crisis. He has once again found the heart of the project in his own journey and awakening. Jeremy and his wife, Jen, live in North Carolina with their three children, Finn (7), Scout (4), and Pearl (2).

Fruit Hunters

Mark Ashton

Morris K. Jesup Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology and Director of School Forests Professor

Ashton conducts research on the biological and physical processes governing the regeneration of natural forests and on the creation of their agroforestry analogs. In particular, he seeks a better understanding of regeneration establishment among assemblages of closely related trees. His long-term research concentrates on tropical and temperate forests of the Asian and American realms. His field sites within these regions were selected specifically to allow comparison of growth, adaptation, and plasticity within and among close assemblages of species that have evolved within forest climates with differing degrees of seasonality. Findings from these studies have theoretical implications for understanding the maintenance of diversity of tree species in forested ecosystems and the adaptability of forests to change in climate. The results of his research have been applied to the development and testing of silvicultural techniques for restoration of degraded lands and for the management of natural forests for a variety of timber and nontimber products. Field sites include tropical forests in Sri Lanka and Panama, temperate forests in India and New England, and boreal forests in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Noris Ledesma

Curator of Tropical Fruit, Fairchild Botanic Garden

Noris is the Curator of Tropical Fruit at the Tropical Fruit Program at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. She is a plant collector with experience in the Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Honduras, Thailand, Philippines, South Africa, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Colombia, Brazil, and India. Her foci are mango (main), Avocado, Jackfruit, mamey sapote, canistel, sapodilla, caimito, and Spanish lime. She has also taught classes on horticulture. Noris is one of the subjects of the film, The Fruit Hunters.

Peter Rothenberg

Owner, Northfordy Farm

Northfordy Farm has been growing vegetables, herbs, flowers, and unusual fruit sustainably since 1975. We also produce maple syrup, free-range eggs, yarn, lamb and chevon (goat). We sell at two farmers markets and we have a small CSA, and we do all of this on 4 acres. We are Certified Naturally Grown. Peter Rothenberg, owner, is past president of CT NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Assoc.). He is a semi-retired psychologist/psychotherapist and spends most of his time growing things. His current project is Nutrient-Dense Crop Production.

A River Changes Course

Youk Chhang

Executive Director, Documentation Center of Cambodia and Executive Producer, A River Changes Course

Youk Chhang is the Executive Director of the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) and a genocide survivor of the Khmer Rouge’s “killing fields.” He became DC-Cam’s leader in 1995, when the Center was founded as a field office of Yale University’s Cambodian Genocide Program to conduct research, training and documentation relating to the Khmer Rouge regime. Youk continued to run the Center after its inception as an independent Cambodian NGO in 1997 and is currently building on DC-Cam’s work to establish the Sleuk Rith Institute, a permanent hub for genocide studies in Asia, based in Phnom Penh. Youk is a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the Study of Genocide, Conflict Resolution, and Human Rights at Rutgers University-Newark. He is also the co-editor ofCambodia’s Hidden Scars: Trauma Psychology in the Wake of the Khmer Rouge (2011) and the author of multiple articles and book chapters on Cambodia’s quest for memory and justice. Youk received the Truman-Reagan Freedom Award from the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation in Washington, DC in 2000. He was also named one of TIME magazine’s “60 Asian heroes” in 2006 and one of the “Time 100” most influential people in the world in 2007 for his stand against impunity in Cambodia and elsewhere.

Roger Cohn

Editor, Yale e360- Moderator

Roger Cohn is the editor of Yale Environment 360, an award-winning online magazine focusing on global environmental issues that is published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has emerged as a leading international source of reporting, analysis, opinion, and discussion on the environment, with more than 2.5 million visitors in the last year in 219 countries and territories. Cohn developed this pioneering Web publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and it has received widespread recognition and numerous honors, including a National Magazine Award for Digital Media and the Online Journalism Award for Best Specialty Site. Yale Environment 360 also co-produced and exclusively featured The Warriors of Qiugang, a video about a Chinese village’s battle against a polluting chemical plant that was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and showed at EFFY 2011. Cohn formerly served as editor-in-chief of Mother Jones and executive editor of Audubon, revitalizing both magazines. Prior to that, he was a staff writer with The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was among the first U.S. journalists to establish an environmental beat. His writing on the environment and other issues has appeared in various publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and Outside. A graduate of Yale College, he has been an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and has served as a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and lectured at various universities, including Columbia, Stanford, and New York University.

Ben Kiernan

A.Whitney Griswold Professor of History and director of the Genocide Studies Program at Yale (http://www.yale.edu/gsp)

Ben Kiernan is the author of Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur (2007), which won the 2008 gold medal for the best work of History awarded by the Independent Publishers association, and the U.S. German Studies Association’s 2009 Sybil Halpern Milton Memorial Book Prize for the best book dealing with Nazi Germany and the Holocaust in its broadest context. His other awards include the 2002 Critical Asian Studies Prize for his edited collection Conflict and Change in Cambodia, and an Honourable Mention in the “One of a Kind” category of the Canadian National Magazine Awards, for his 2006 co-authored article “Bombs over Cambodia.” Kiernan is also the author of Genocide and Resistance in Southeast Asia: Documentation, Denial and Justice in Cambodia and East Timor (2007), The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 1975-1979 (1996), and How Pol Pot Came to Power: Colonialism, Nationalism, and Communism in Cambodia, 1930-1975 (1985). He was founding Director of the Cambodian Genocide Program (1994-99) and Convenor of the Yale East Timor Project (2000-02).

Kaylanee Mam

Filmmaker, A River Changes Course

Having escaped war-torn Cambodia in 1979, lawyer-turned-filmmaker Kalyanee Mam (Yale College '99) seeks to combine human rights and law in creating documentaries that are both captivating and inspiring. Mam’s past work includes the 2011 Academy Award-winning documentary about the global financial crisis, Inside Job, where she served as cinematographer, associate producer, and researcher, and her first documentary short, "Between Earth & Sky." She directed, produced, and shot this film, which follows the hopes and struggles of three young Iraqi refugees.

Elemental

Sir Peter Crane- Moderator

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and Professor of Botany

Dean Crane is the Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is known internationally for his work on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was Director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the Museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today comprise the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was Director of The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation and public programs. Professor Crane was elected to the Royal Society – the UK academy of sciences in 1998. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the German Academy Leopoldina. He was knighted in the UK for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. Professor Crane currently serves on the Boards of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S., the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.

John Grim

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

John Grim is currently a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges. He is Coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions. In that series he edited Indigenous Traditions and Ecology: the Interbeing of Cosmology and Community (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include: The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” John is also President of the American Teilhard Association.

Emmanuel Vaughan Lee

Filmmaker, Elemental and Yukon Kings

Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee is a director, producer, musician and composer. In 2005 he founded the Global Oneness Project, a webby award winning media platform and production-company. He has directed and produced numerous award winning short films–A Thousand Suns (2009), What Would it Look Like (2009), A Game for Life (2008), Barrio de Paz (2007), Seva Café (2007) that have been widely distributed online and aired on PBS, LINK TV, and ABC Australia among others. Prior to his work in film Emmanuel performed and recorded as a sideman with some of the biggest names in Jazz, as well as releasing two records under his own name, Previous Misconceptions (2002) and Borrowed Time (2005).

Gold Fever

JT Haines 

Co-Director, Gold Fever

JT serves as producer, writer and director with Northland Films, a three-person documentary film collective based out of Minnesota and Iowa City. JT formerly practiced as a corporate attorney at Dorsey & Whitney in Minneapolis, and holds a law degree from the University of Virginia and a public policy degree from the University of Minnesota.

Grahame Russell

Co-Director of Rights Action 

Grahame is a non-practicing Canadian lawyer, author, adjunct professor at the University of Northern British Columbia and, since 1995, co-director of Rights Action.

Andrew Sherburne

Co-Director, Gold Fever

Andrew serves as producer, director and director of photography with Northland Films, a three-person documentary film collective based out of Minnesota and Iowa City. Andrew is co-founder of FilmScene, a non-profit cinema arts group in Iowa City, and the former publisher of Little Village Magazine. Andrew holds studio arts and computer science degrees from Grinnell College.

Helga Tzicap de Snow

Human Rights Lawyer

Helga Snow is a lawyer and law professor in Guatemala with a focus in democratization and human rights. Helga has worked in a variety of areas related to human rights and the defense of indigenous women. From 2009 to 2010, Helga worked as a fellow for the Organization of American States, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Washington D.C.. There she worked on cases involving indigenous rights and mining. Helga has also worked for the Guatemalan Women’s Defense Ministry; at the legal department at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, CT, and as legal advisor at the Consulate of Guatemala in New York City. Helga currently works at Lawyers Without Borders in New Haven, where she researchers issues related to women’s rights and mediation in Africa and Latin America.

More than Honey

Mark H. Creighton

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

Mark H. Creighton works for the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven as an Agricultural Research Technician. He is assigned to the State Entomologist Office as Connecticut’s Apiary Inspector. These duties involve inspecting honey bee colonies for disease and assisting Connecticut Beekeepers in support of Connecticut’s multimillion dollar agricultural industry. Mark grew up in New Hampshire and started Beekeeping at a young age. He keeps bees in several locations in Connecticut and is the official Beekeeper for The Agricultural Experiment Station.

Benjamin Gardner 

Apiary Inspector, State of Connecticut

Benjamin is the owner and beekeeper at Pollen, a company that works to create solutions for sustainable living by installing and managing all aspects of small scale food production and waste reduction. He is also responsible for the construction of chicken coops, compost bins and raised garden beds, among other types of projects. Benjamin is an avid community gardener, volunteering as the Chair of the New Haven Land Trust's Garden Committee, as well as being a Board Member at Common Ground.

The Last Ocean

Mary Beth Decker

Associate Research Scientist, Yale University - Moderator

Mary Beth Decker is an Associate Research Scientist the the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department at Yale. She interested in how oceanographic processes and conditions affect the distribution, abundance and behavior of marine predators and their prey and how these processes affect trophic structure of coastal ecosystems. She uses a multi-scale, interdisciplinary approach to investigate these processes, by employing shipboard expeditions, laboratory experiments, modeling, and retrospective examinations of long-term data sets.

Thomas Near

Associate Professor, Yale University

Thomas Near is an Associate Professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at Yale. His current research is focused on several lineages of North American freshwater fishes, as well as a clade of fishes endemic to the waters surrounding Antarctica.

Lauri Kealoha Friedenburg, Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and Adjunct Professor, Quinnipiac University

Trashed

Mike Biddle

MBA Polymers

Throwing water bottles into the recycling bin doesn’t begin to address the massive quantity of postconsumer plastic that ends up in landfills and the ocean. Because it’s so difficult to separate the various kinds of plastics – up to 20 kinds per product – that make up our computers, cell phones, cars and home appliances, only a small fraction of plastics from complex waste streams are recycled, while the rest is tossed. In 1992, Mike Biddle, a plastics engineer, set out to find a solution. He set up a lab in his garage in Pittsburg, California, and began experimenting with complex-plastics recycling, borrowing ideas from such industries as mining and grain processing. Since then, Biddle has developed a patented 30-step plastics recycling system that includes magnetically extracting metals, shredding the plastics, sorting them by polymer type and producing graded pellets to be reused in industry – a process that takes less than a tenth of the energy required to make virgin plastic from crude oil. Today, the company he cofounded, MBA Polymers, has plants in China and Austria, and plans to build more in Europe, where electronics-waste regulation (which doesn’t yet have an equivalent in the US) already ensures a stream of materials to exploit – a process Biddle calls “above-ground mining.” Mike is featured in the movie Trashed.

Marian Chertow 

Associate Professor of Industrial Environmental Management, Director of the Program on Solid Waste Policy, and Director of the Industrial Environmental Management Program

Marian Chertow is the Associate Professor of Industrial Environmental Management and has been Director of the Industrial Environmental Management Program at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies since 1991. Her research and teaching focus on industrial ecology, business/environment issues, waste management, and environmental technology innovation. Primary research interests are 1) The study of industrial symbiosis including geographically-based exchanges of wastes, materials, energy, and water within networks of businesses. 2) The potential of industrial ecology to underpin ideas of the proposed Circular Economy law in China. 3) The application of innovation theory to the development of environmental and energy technology. Prior to Yale, Marian spent ten years in environmental business and state and local government including service as President of the Connecticut Resources Recovery Authority charged with developing a billion dollar waste infrastructure system for the state. She is a frequent international lecturer and has testified on waste, recycling and other environmental issues before committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Marian is on the Editorial Board of BioCycle Magazine and the Journal of Industrial Ecology, the Board of the Eco-Industrial Development Council, as well as on the Advisory Board of the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund, which is developing renewable energy projects to increase the availability of green energy. Marian serves on the founding faculty of the Masters of Science in Environmental Management Program at the National University of Singapore where she teaches “Business and Environment” and is a Visiting Professor at Nankai University and National Center for Innovation Research on Circular Economy in China.

CJ May

Recycling Expert, New Haven, CT

After graduating from Yale Forestry and Environmental Studies with a Masters of Environmental Management, CJ May worked as Yale's recycling coordinator for more than 20 years. During that time he planned, implemented and coordinated Yale's sustainable materials management efforts in compliance with state and local laws as well as Yale's rapidly developing sustainability goals. CJ has also served as the president of the Connecticut Recyclers Coalition and remains an active member of its board. Combining his love for magic with his love for the environment, CJ presents and performs sustainability-focused magic. For adult audiences, CJ's Resourcery takes the form of TED Talk style presentations or professional development and training. When performing for children he assumes the role of "Cyril the Sorcerer" as he uses magic to share important messages on recycling, water, energy and other issues.

John Wargo

Tweedy Ordway Professor of Environmental Health and Politics

John Wargo is a Professor of Risk Analysis, Environmental Policy, and Political Science, and Chair of the Yale College Environmental Studies Major and Program. He has just written Green Intelligence Creating Environments that Protect Human Health published by Yale Press. The book won the Independent Publishers Award of Gold Medal in the field of “environment, ecology, and nature” for 2010. It also won the 2010 Connecticut Book Award in non-fiction. It was chosen as one of Scientific American’s favorite books for 2009. Professor Wargo also wrote Our Children’s Toxic Legacy: How Science and Law Fail to Protect Us from Pesticides, published by Yale University Press in 1998, presenting a history of law and science governing pesticides with special attention to the vulnerability of infants and children. The book won the American Association of Publishers award as the Best Scholarly & Professional Book in Government and Political Science in 1998. He is also co-author of Ecosystems: Science and Management published by Springer-Verlag in 1998. Wargo participated in several National Academy of Sciences committees, analyzing children’s exposure to toxic substances. He also has testified before both Senate and House Committees, and been an advisor to the White House, the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture organization, the EPA, USDA, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on environmental threats to children’s health. He has participated in the design of federal and state laws and regulations intended to reduce human exposures to air pollution, pesticides, plastics, mercury, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.


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Installation: Young Photographers Exhibition


Theme: The Art of Storytelling

 

CONTACT: Elizabeth Babalola, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

For Immediate Release: Dec 16, 2014

 

Calling All Young Filmmakers & Photographers

 

New Haven, CT- As part of events lined up for the 2014 Environmental Film Festival at Yale, EFFY will be hosting the second-annual Young Filmmakers and Photographers Contests. This contest will run in conjunction with the larger film-festivalMarch 31 – April 6 2014. EFFY attracted over 3,000 attendees last year and was listed in the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences “20 Great Resources for Green Filmmakers.”

 

EFFY aims to encourage and empower a new generation of engaged, active, and media-savvy youth to imagine the possibilities of environmental storytelling.  We will celebrate the amazing environmental journeys of students and teachers across the country by harnessing their own skill, talent, and creativity!

 

Therefore, we invite young filmmakers and photographers to tell us

‘YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL STORY’ with One – Five pictures or aFive-minute Video

 

  • Filmmakers and photographers must be 25 years or younger
  • Entries must depict or address an environmental issue
  • Entries will be divided into two age categories;
  •        Secondary (21 years & under) and Post-secondary (22 – 25 years)
  • Entries must be produced within 18 months of submission
  • The maximum length for film submissions - 5 minutes
  • Contestants must be enrolled at a middle, high school, undergraduate or graduate program OR affiliated with an educational program or institution
  • Submission is free via online entry forms (links) below & at environment.yale.edu/film
  • Multiple submissions are welcome by February 28th, 2014
  • One winner will be selected in each of the two age categories for photographers and filmmakers

 

 

JURY & AWARDS

A jury comprised of Yale professors, and film industry representatives will select finalists based on story telling, film making techniques, and audience appeal.

We will feature the finalists’ photographs on our Facebook page for the Audience Favorite Award and display them at an art gallery at Yale throughout the festival.

Finalists’ videos will screen in a special session during the festival and the audience will vote on winners in each category.

 

Finalists will also receive entrance to filmmaking workshops during EFFY and a certificate. EFFY will announce additional awards for winners in each category shortly. The Environmental Film Festival at Yale is excited to see the creative talent of the next generation of filmmakers!

 

For inquiries visit environment.yale.edu/film or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

 

 


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Trashed


New England Premiere

Sunday, April 14th, 6:00pm
Sheffield-Sterling-Strathcona Hall (SSS), 1 Prospect Street

Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons pulls up his wellies to cross littered beaches in Lebanon, inspect prison compost heaps in Yorkshire and investigate a state-of-the-art recycling plant in San Francisco on his voyage of discovery about the garbage we create, every hour of every day, across the planet.

Journeying from Iceland to Indonesia, Irons speaks to scientists, politicians and ordinary citizens whose health and livelihoods have been affected by pollution. From individuals who have changed their lives to produce almost no waste, to an increase in anti-waste legislation, to an entire city that has gone waste-free, he discovers that change is not only essential, but happening.

Followed by a discussion with John Wargo, Marian Chertow, Mike Biddle, and CJ May.

About the Filmmaker

The British filmmaker and journalist, Candida Brady's work has taken her around the world. While working for the UK's national press she reported on many leading events as well as initiating campaigns for legislative changes in animal trading and welfare.

She founded her film company, Blenheim Films, in 1996, and has produced and directed documentaries on a variety of subjects including a ten year project following a breakthrough treatment for HIV and AIDS. Trashed is Candida's first feature film.

Preceded By: Irish Folk Furniture

9 min. Dir. Tony Donoghue. In Ireland, old hand-painted furniture is often associated with hard times, with poverty, and with a time many would rather forget. In this animated documentary, 16 pieces of traditional folk furniture are repaired and returned home.

Watch the Trailer for Trashed:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 97 Min.

Website: trashedfilm.com

Director: Candida Brady
Producers: Candida Brady and Titus Ogilvy
Executive Producers: Jeremy Irons, Candida Brady, Titus Ogilvy and Tom Wesel
Editors: James Coward, Kate Coggins, Jamie Trevill
Composer: Vangelis


The Last Ocean


New England Premiere

Sunday, April 14th, 3:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

The Ross Sea Antarctica is the most pristine stretch of ocean on Earth. Scientists describe it as our last 'living laboratory', a place that can teach us about the workings of all marine ecosystems. But the fishing industry recently found its way to the Ross Sea, targeting Antarctic Toothfish and unless stopped, the natural balance of this unique ecosystem will be lost forever. The Last Ocean follows the race to protect the Ross Sea from our insatiable appetite for fish, and raises the simple ethical question: do we fish Earth’s last untouched ocean or do we protect it?

Followed by a discussion with Mary Beth Decker, Tom Near, and Kealoha Freidenburg.

About the Filmmaker

Peter Young is an award-winning documentary cameraman and producer. He came to filmmaking the long way, spending the first ten years of his working on the land and sea over which time he developed a strong connection to the great outdoors and people that live and work there. Peter established Fisheye Films in Christchurch, New Zealand in 1997 and has worked as a freelance director and cameraman ever since. He has credits in well over a hundred documentaries, among them; BBC’s Blue Planet Series, a Giant Squid documentary for prime time Discovery, he filmed over fifty episodes of New Zealand’s longest running documentary series, Country Calendar and the final tribute documentary for Sir Edmund Hilary. He produced and shot the award winning series Hunger for the Wild for TVNZ and is now working on his second series of Coasters. The Last Ocean is Peter’s first feature documentary. A project he began in 2006, this labour of love has expanded into the formation of a Charitable Trust to promote the protection of the Ross Sea, Antarctica, the world’s most pristine marine ecosystem. Peter has won many awards for his skills and creativity behind the camera, both shooting and producing, but it's the opportunity to work with great teams and telling great stories that keeps him in the business.

Preceded By: The Artificial Leaf

3 min. Dir. Jared P. Scott and Kelly Nyks. Dan Nocera has a simple formula to save the planet: sunlight + water = energy for the world.

Watch the Trailer for The Last Ocean:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 85 Min.

Website: lastocean.org

Director: Peter Young


More Than Honey


Connecticut Premiere

Sunday, April 14th, 12:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Einstein supposedly said: "If the bee disappears from the surface of the Earth, man would have no more than four years left to live." Over the last decade, millions of bees have disappeared worldwide. Is this a one-time anomaly or are we facing total system collapse? Looking for answers, director Markus Imhoof—using exquisite cinematography to put the viewer inside the bees’ world—travels from the Alps to the Arizona desert, interviewing experts ranging from beekeepers to scientists. What separates this work from earlier films on the subject is that Imhoof proposes a possible solution…

Followed by a discussion with special guests TBA.

About the Filmmakers

Academy-Award nominated Markus Imhoof was born in Winterthur, Switzerland. He studied film at the Zurich School for Arts and Crafts. His feature films include The Boat is Full (81), The Journey (86), The Mountain (90), Fire in Paradise (97). His feature documentaries include Volksmund (72), Via Scarlatti 20 (82), Les petites illusions (91) and More Than Honey (12).

Preceded By: Nile Perch

17 min. Dir. Josh Gibson. A man and a fish on Lake Victoria in Uganda. This hand-made black and white film is a meditation on the economic impact of an invasive species as well as a parable about the effects of globalization and colonialism on Africa.

Watch the Trailer for More Than Honey:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 90 Min.

Directors: Markus Imhoof
 


The East


Connecticut Premiere
Sunday, April 14th, 10:00am
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

THE EAST, a suspenseful and provocative espionage thriller from acclaimed writer-director Zal Batmanglij and writer-actress Brit Marling, stars Marling as former FBI agent Sarah Moss. Moss is starting a new career at Hiller Brood, an elite private intelligence firm that ruthlessly protects the interests of its A-list corporate clientele. Handpicked for a plum assignment by the company's head honcho, Sharon (Patricia Clarkson), Sarah goes deep undercover to infiltrate The East, an elusive anarchist collective seeking revenge against major corporations guilty of covering up criminal activity. Determined, highly-trained and resourceful, Sarah soon ingratiates herself with the group, overcoming their initial suspicions and joining them on their next action or "jam." But living closely with the intensely committed members of The East, Sarah finds herself torn between her two worlds as she starts to connect with anarchist Benji (Alexander Skarsgård) and the rest of the collective, and awakens to the moral contradictions of her personal life.

Followed by a discussion with actress and screenwriter Brit Marling, director and screenwriter Zal Batmanglij, and other special guests.

About the Filmmaker

In 2012, Variety ranked Zal Batmanglij one of its “10 Directors to Watch” as a result of his directorial debut, Sound of My Voice, which screened at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. His follow-up feature, The East, stars longtime collaborator Brit Marling alongside Alexander Skarsgård and Ellen Page. Batmanglij grew up in Washington, D.C., and studied anthropology at Georgetown University. He was a directing fellow at the American Film Institute, where his peers elected him to speak at graduation.

Watch the Trailer for The East:


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Genre: Narrative
Year: 2013
Running Time: 116 Min.

Website: foxsearchlight.com/theeast/

Director: Zal Batmanglij
Starring: Brit Marling, Alexander Skarsgård, Ellen Page
Screenwriters: Zal Batmanglij, Brit Marling
Executive Producer: Tony Scott
Producers: Ridley Scott, Michael Costigan, Jocelyn Hayes-Simpson, Brit Marling
Cinematographer: Roman Vasyanov
Editors: Andrew Weisblum, Bill Pankow
Production Designer: Alex DiGerlando
Costume Designer: Jenny Gering


EFFY After Dark


Saturday, April 13th, 9:00pm

GPSCY Bar, 204 York Street, 2nd floor ballroom

Join us in celebrating the World Premiere of Gold Fever, and the wrap up of EFFY 2012! With live music, drink specials, free food and desserts. No cover. Open to the public (21+).

Featuring live music by Elgin and the Tonics followed by dancing with music from DJ Philbo Shaggins.


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EFFY After Dark


Saturday, April 13th, 9:00pm
GPSCY bar, 204 York St., 2nd floor ballroom

Join us in celebrating the World Premiere of Gold Fever and the wrap up of EFFY 2013! Featuring live music, drink specials, free food and dessert! No cover. Open to the public (21+).

Live band Elgin and the Tonics with DJ Philbo Shaggins.


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Gold Fever


World Premiere

Saturday, April 13th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

500 years have passed since the conquistadors sailed, but the fever for gold persists. On Wall Street, fearful investors push gold prices to record highs, while in the Guatemalan highlands, Goldcorp Inc. levels ancient mountains to feed the hunger. GOLD FEVER witnesses the arrival of the global economy to formerly remote San Miguel Ixtahuacán where a new mine has turned the town on its head. Caught in the crosshairs of a worldwide frenzy for gold, Gregoria, Diodora and Crisanta defend their ancestral lands in the face of long odds, and grave consequences.

Followed by a discussion with filmmakers JT Haines and Andrew Sherburne, film subject Grahame Russell, and Helga Tzicap de Snow.

About the Filmmakers

Andrew Sherburne, JT Haines and Tommy Haines — together, Northland Films — are US-based documentary filmmakers devoted to producing engaging films on challenging subjects. The filmmakers employ a unique collaborative style to uncover themes of nature, community and development in unexpected places. Their current feature, Gold Fever, is the company’s third feature-length documentary.

Preceded By: La Heredad

Dir. Bruno Monteferri and Dana Bonilla. La Heredad is the story of Lola and Perico, a mother and son who live in the heart of the magical Utcubamba valley in Amazonas, Peru. They innovate every day in order to live sustainably. Their optimism towards life and their knowledge about what matters most is contagious. This film is part of the Conservamos por Naturaleza campaign that seeks to (re)connect people with nature. 

Watch the Trailer for Gold Fever:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 83 Min.

Website: goldfevermovie.com

Directors: Andrew Sherburne, JT Haines, and Tommy Haines
Producers: Sasha Waters Freyer, Kembrew McLeod, Matt Ehling, David Gould
Sound: Peter Levin
Composer: Michael Kramer
 


Special Event: Documentary vs. Advocacy


The Blurred Lines of Environmental Filmmaking

Saturday, April 13th, 5:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Travis Rummel, visual story teller and quiet observer of people, nature, peril and hope, joins us for a conversation about environmental filmmaker, and to share his experiences in the making of documentary films including Damnation and Red Gold

About Travis

Travis Rummel is a filmmaker and a partner with Ben Knight in Felt Soul Media, which makes documentaries. The duo is known for thoughtful and beautiful films about nature, culture, and environmental issues. Red Gold focused on a proposed gold and copper mine at the headwaters of an indigenous salmon spawning ground in Alaska. The film had an enormous impact on the debate around the mine, rallying people to oppose the project that would have altered both the river’s ecosystem and a longtime way of life for the community. Rummel and Knight are now working on a film, in conjunction with Patagonia, about removing dams in America and restoring free-flowing rivers. Damnation.


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EFFY 2013 Lineup


Yale’s Fifth Annual Environmental Film Festival Offers New Ways to Think About Our Planet

Click here for full line-up.

NEW HAVEN, CONN. - ­­An Academy Award­-nominated documentary about urban can and bottle­-collectors, a cinematic journey through the world of exotic fruit, the World Premiere of an incisive new exposé on gold mining, and special appearances by filmmakers are some of the highlights of the fifth annual Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY) taking place April 8­-14.

“This year EFFY has really stepped it up a notch,” said Kendall Barbery, one of the festival directors. “We have more events than ever before that use storytelling and the arts to challenge our audiences to think in new ways.”
 
“We had a record number of submissions this year from all over the world,” said Richard Miron, Director of Programming. “We have selected an engaging, eclectic, and powerful group of films that will transport our audiences, while at the same time really hit home.”
 
This year, EFFY will feature two films by Yale graduates: Sundance award-­winning “A River Changes Course,” directed by Kalyanee Mam (Yale College ‘99), and Oscar-­nominated “Redemption,” co-­directed by Matthew O’Neill (Yale College ‘00).
 
The festival will feature a World Premiere, a US Premiere, and several East Coast and New England premieres. All screenings are free and open to the public and will take place at the following New Haven venues: Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street; Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel Street; Co-­Op Arts and Humanities High School, 177 College St., and Sheffield-­Sterling-­Strathcona Hall, 1 Prospect St. Panel discussions with filmmakers, special guests and Yale faculty will be held after each film. There will be additional short films, interactive side events and screenings. Stay tuned to www.environment.yale.edu/film for more details.
 
Musicwood (New England Premiere) - An unusual band of the world's top guitar­-makers travel together into the heart of one of the most primeval rainforests in the world. Their mission: to negotiate with Native American loggers and change the way this forest is logged before it's too late for acoustic guitars.
 
A River Changes Course (Connecticut Premiere) - Winner of the Sundance Film Festival World Documentary Prize. A breathtaking and unprecedented journey from the remote, mountainous jungles and floating cities of the Cambodian countryside to the bustling garment factories of modern Phnom Penh, A River Changes Course traces a remarkable and devastatingly beautiful story of a country torn between the rural present and an ominous industrial future.
 
Elemental (East Coast Premiere) - Elemental follows three outsiders who are obsessed by nature and driven by a deep desire to change the status quo. Separated by continents,each character is part of a global story about water and climate change that goes beyond the issues to reveal the public triumphs and emotional scars of life on the front line.
 
The Fruit Hunters (New England Premiere) - Adventurers, exotic fruits fanatics and even movie star Bill Pullman, are the subjects of The Fruit Hunters. A thrilling journey through nature, commerce and adventure, The Fruit Hunters is a cinematic odyssey that takes viewers from the dawn of humanity to the cutting of edge of modern agriculture ­ a film that will change not just the way we look at we eat, but what it means to be human.
 
Gold Fever (World Premiere) - Gold, an obsession of men and nations; a symbol of wealth and power. But for Diodora, Gregoria, Crisanta and the people living near the Marlin Mine in Guatemala's highlands, gold represents oppression, intimidation, pollution and even murder. With the rising price of gold, the mine's owner, Goldcorp, posts record profits, while these courageous women live in resistance to the mine's unstoppable hunger.
 
GMO OMG (U.S. Premiere) - GMO OMG tells the story of a fathers discovery of GMOs in relationship to his 3 young children and the world around him. Each of us unknowingly consumes genetically engineered food on a daily basis. Yet more and more studies are being conducted around the world, which only provide even more reason for concern. We are the oblivious guinea pigs for wide­scale experimentation of modern biotechnology.
 
Redemption - Redemption is an Oscar­-nominated short documentary about New York City's canners ­ the men and women who survive by redeeming bottles and cans they collect from curbs, garbage cans and apartment complexes. You've seen them combing through the trash, but never got to meet them. The film is an unexpected and intimate look at post-­industrial gleaners, struggling at the edge of our society.
 
Trashed (New England Premiere) Jeremy Irons sets out to discover the extent and effects of the global waste problem, as he travels around the world to beautiful destinations tainted by pollution. This is a meticulous, brave investigative journey that
takes Irons (and us) from skepticism to sorrow and from horror to hope.
 
The Last Ocean (New England Premiere) The Ross Sea Antarctica is the most pristine stretch of ocean on Earth. Scientists describe it as our last 'living laboratory', a place that can teach us about the workings of all marine ecosystems. But the fishing industry recently found its way to the Ross Sea, targeting Antarctic Toothfish and unless stopped, the natural balance of this unique ecosystem will be lost forever.
 
More than Honey (Connecticut Premiere) Einstein supposedly said: "If the bee disappears from the surface of the Earth, man would have no more than four years left to live." Over the last decade, millions of bees have disappeared worldwide. Is this a one­time anomaly or are we facing total system collapse? Looking for answers, director Markus Imhoof—using exquisite cinematography to put the viewer inside the bees’ world—travels from the Alps to the Arizona desert, interviewing experts ranging from beekeepers to scientists.
 
Schools Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten - No classroom for these kindergarteners. In Switzerland's Langnau am Albis, a suburb of Zurich, children 4 to 7 years of age, go to kindergarten in the woods every day, no matter what the weatherman says. This eye-opening film looks into the important question of what it is that children need at that age. There is laughter, beauty and amazement in the process of finding out.
 
EFFY is organized and run primarily by students at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and is the largest student­-run environmental film festival in the world. Major sponsors of the 2013 festival include Films at the Whitney, The Study at Yale Hotel, the Class of 1980 Fund at F&ES, and the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.
 
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CONTACT: Richard Miron: 203.936.9819 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

For Immediate Release: March 19, 2012
 
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More updates to come!

Shorts II: Redemption


These two challenging shorts, in very different ways, examine the adult struggle to co-exist with increasingly difficult environments.

Bad Water

Directed by Amman Abbasi. USA, 13 min. Fiction.

DB is a mentally handicapped man who lives in an isolated town, and struggles with health issues. Through his straightforward and unbiased narration, we soon realize that he is one of the key surviving members of a community that was devastated by water contamination. With a poetic and personal tone, Bad Water challenges the nature of man and his inability to do good for himself.

Redemption

Directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill (Yale College '00). USA, 35 min. Documentary.

Redemption is a documentary about New York City's canners - the men and women who survive by redeeming bottles and cans they collect from curbs, garbage cans and apartment complexes. You've seen them combing through the trash, but never got to meet them. The film is an unexpected and intimate look at post-industrial gleaners, struggling at the edge of our society. 2013 Academy Award Nominee, Documentary Short Subject.

Watch the Trailer for Redemption:


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Shorts I: School’s Out!


This family-friendly collection of short films explores the student in all of us, the awe and wonder of discovering new relationships with the natural world...

Pollinating Connecticut

Directed by Tahria Sheather. CT, USA, 5 min.  

A portrait of a local Connecticut beekeeper's passion for his hives.

The Rein of Mary King

Directed by Lucy Walker. United Kingdom, 10 min.  

A tribute to the distinguished reign of one of Britain's longest-serving Olympic equestrians, and to the horses who got her there.

Director Lucy Walker is an EFFY alumna, having previously directed Waste Land, and Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom.

Common Ground

Directed by Chandra Simon (FES '12). USA, 4 min.  

A portrait of a young couple's new farm in the Hudson Valley.

School's Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten

Directed by Lisa Molomot. Switzerland and New Haven, CT, USA, 36 min.  

No classroom for these kindergarteners. In Switzerland's Langnau am Albis, a suburb of Zurich, children 4 to 7 years of age, go to kindergarten in the woods every day, no matter what the weatherman says. This eye-opening film looks into the important question of what it is that children need at that age. There is laughter, beauty and amazement in the process of finding out... 

Followed by a Q&A discussion with filmmaker Lisa Molomot.

Young Filmmaker Contest Finalists

Parks and ReCreation: One man's relentless mission to civilize nature leads to the discovery of his own savagery. (Brent Sievers)

Magician's Favour: A curious, young boy wonders if a magician can make a bag of trash disappear. The result is deception that is unfortunately reflective of many people's regard for trash. (Jeremy Hung)

Trespassing Nature: An observation of the relationship between natural and unnatural in an urban context. (Javier Storch)

The Immigrant: What's a polar bear doing in New Haven? A look at the challenges of adapting to a changing world. (Omar Malik)

To learn more about the contest, click here.

 

Watch the Trailer for School's Out:


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Elemental


East Coast Premiere

Friday, April 12th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Elemental follows three outsiders who are obsessed by nature and driven by a deep desire to change the status quo. Rajendra Singh, an Indian government official gone rogue, mounts a national crusade to save the Ganges River. Activist Eriel Deranger leads a David and Goliath fight against the oil giants who are destroying her homeland in the Canadian Tar Sands. Australian inventor, Jay Harman, is attempting to halve the world's energy consumption by mimicking natural systems. Separated by continents, each character is part of a global story about water and climate change that goes beyond the issues to reveal the public triumphs and emotional scars of life on the front line.

Followed by a discussion with the filmmaker, Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, Tom Owens, and John Grim. Moderated by Sir Peter Crane.

About the Filmmakers

Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee is a director, producer, musician and composer. In 2005 he founded the Global Oneness Project, a webby award winning media platform and production-company. He has directed and produced numerous award winning short films–A Thousand Suns (2009), What Would it Look Like (2009), A Game for Life (2008), Barrio de Paz (2007), Seva Café (2007) that have been widely distributed online and aired on PBS, LINK TV, and ABC Australia among others. Prior to his work in film Emmanuel performed and recorded as a sideman with some of the biggest names in Jazz, as well as releasing two records under his own name, Previous Misconceptions (2002) and Borrowed Time (2005).

Gayatri Roshan started her career in London where she produced over 50 television and radio commercial campaigns for Sony BMG, Universal Music, Virgin Music and numerous top bands, including Outkast and Pink. In 2005 she cofounded the Species Alliance, with whom she wrote and produced a documentary, Call of Life. In 2008/9 she wrote and produced A Thousand Suns (PBS) and Peace Wanted Alive (Link TV). In 2010, she completed work as producer and executive producer of Harmony, a feature length documentary inspired by and in collaboration with the Prince of Wales that aired for NBC’s 2010 Green Week.

Preceded By: Groundswell

25 min. Dir. Chris Malloy. Chris and friends set out on a boat to document the beauty and habitat of BC, a place where the rare white black bear calls home.

Watch the Trailer for Elemental:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 90 Min.

Directors: Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee and Gayatri Roshan


A River Changes Course


New England Premiere

Thursday, April 11th, 7:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Twice a year in Cambodia, the Tonle Sap River changes course, while the river of life flows in a perpetual cycle of death and rebirth and of creation and destruction. Working in an intimate, verite style, filmmaker Kalyanee Mam, spent two years in her native homeland following three young Cambodians struggling to overcome the crushing effects of deforestation, overfishing, and overwhelming debt. A breathtaking and unprecedented journey from the remote, mountainous jungles and floating cities of the Cambodian countryside to the bustling garment factories of modern Phnom Penh, A River Changes Course traces a remarkable and devastatingly beautiful story of a country torn between the rural present and an ominous industrial future.

Followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Kalyanee Mam, Ben Kiernan, and Youk Chhang, moderated by Roger Cohn

About the Filmmaker

Having escaped war-torn Cambodia in 1979, lawyer-turned-filmmaker Kalyanee Mam (Yale College '99) seeks to combine human rights and law in creating documentaries that are both captivating and inspiring. Mam’s past work includes the 2011 Academy Award-winning documentary about the global financial crisis, Inside Job, where she served as cinematographer, associate producer, and researcher, and her first documentary short, "Between Earth & Sky." She directed, produced, and shot this film, which follows the hopes and struggles of three young Iraqi refugees.

Watch the Trailer for A River Changes Course:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 83 min.

Website: ariverchangescourse.com

Director: Kalyanee Mam (Yale College '99)
Producers: Ratanak Leng, Kalyanee Mam
Executive Producers: Youk Chhang
Director of Photography: Kalyanee Mam
Editor: Chris Brown


The Fruit Hunters


New England Premiere

Wednesday, April 10th, 7:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

The Fruit Hunters travels across culture, history and geography to show how intertwined we are with the fruits we eat. Our guides are devoted fruit fanatics. Movie star Bill Pullman’s obsession leads him on a crusade to create a community orchard in the Hollywood Hills. Adventurers Noris Ledesma and Richard Campbell scour the jungle for rare mangos, hoping to intervene before the plants are steamrolled by industrialization. Pioneering scientist Juan Aguilar races to breed bananas resistant to a deadly fungus that threatens the worldwide crop. And fruit detectives including Isabella Dalla Ragione investigate Renaissance-era paintings for clues, hoping to rediscover lost fruits. And, of course, there are the fruits themselves, presented in all their mouthwatering glory: cherimoyas, ice cream beans, durians and more.

A cinematic odyssey through nature and commerce, The Fruit Hunters will change not only the way we look at what we eat  but how we view our relationship to the natural world.

Followed by a fruit tasting and panel discussion with fruit expert and film subject Noris Ledesma, Mark Ashton, and Peter Rothenberg.

About the Filmmaker

Yung Chang, made his feature documentary, Up the Yangtze in 2007. The film used China’s highly contested Three Gorges Dam as a dramatic backdrop for a moving and richly detailed narrative of a peasant family negotiating unprecedented historic changes. Up The Yangtze played at numerous festivals and was one of the top-grossing documentary box office releases in 2008. China Heavyweight is Chang’s sophomore film. It had its World Premiere at Sundance 2012 and is currently traveling the festival circuit. The film is playing in Canadian cinemas and will open the USA in NYC on July 6, 2012.  He is also currently writing Eggplant, his first feature film, about a Chinese wedding photographer.

Preceded By: Oh Willy...

15 min. Dir. Emma de Swaef. Forced to return to his naturist roots, Willy bungles his way into noble savagery.

Watch the Trailer for The Fruit Hunters:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 90 min.

Website: eyesteelfilm.com/fruithunters

Director: Yung Chang
Producers: Mila Aung-Thwin, Katherine Baulu, Bob Moore
Executive Producers: Ravida Din
Director of Photography: Mark O'Fearghail
Editor: Mila Aung-Thwin, Hannele Halm, Omar Majeed


Installation: Sustainability Heard


Preceding all films at the Whitney Humanities Center
Wednesday, April 10th - Sunday, April 14th, 2013

Join the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and EFFY for an interactive experience involving expression and activism. Audience members will have the opportunity to share their feelings on sustainability in both the physical and digital space. You won't want to miss it. 

Event facilitated by AIGA.

About AIGA:

Founded in 1914 as the American Institute of Graphic Arts, AIGA remains the oldest and largest professional membership organization for design and is now known simply as “AIGA, the professional association for design.” AIGA has 67 chapters, and over 23,000 members. (www.aiga.org)


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Special Event: Jazz Ecology


with the Aaron Diehl Trio

Wednesday, April 10th, 5:30pm
Sudler Hall, 100 Wall Street

Jazz Ecology is a hybrid performance and presentation where a trio led by pianist Aaron Diehl will discuss the fundamental elements of jazz music, and draw out the themes that are also strongly present in the environment: coping with sorrow and loss, achieving balance and equilibrium, and managing change. The trio demonstrates how jazz can be used to express the emotion of the environment, and will perform environmentally-themed pieces.

Sponsored by the Yale Institute of Sacred Music.

About Aaron Diehl

Hailed by the New York Times as a “Revelation,” and the Chicago Tribune as “The most promising discovery that [Wynton] Marsalis has made since Eric Reed,” Aaron Diehl’s distinctive interpretations of the music of Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, Art Tatum, Duke Ellington, and other masters pays homage to the tradition while establishing his own original voice. Aaron Diehl is the 2011 Cole Porter Fellow in Jazz of the American Pianists Association. For more info, visit Aaron's website.


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GMO OMG


U.S. Premiere

Tuesday, April 9th, 7:00pm
Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street

Today in the United States, by the simple acts of feeding ourselves, we are unwittingly participating in the largest experiment ever conducted on human beings. Each of us unknowingly consumes genetically engineered food on a daily basis. The risks and effects to our health and the environment are largely unknown. Yet more and more studies are being conducted around the world, which only provide even more reason for concern. We are the oblivious guinea pigs for wide-scale experimentation of modern biotechnology. GMO OMG tells the story of a fathers discovery of GMOs in relationship to his 3 young children and the world around him. We still have time to heal the planet, feed the world, and live sustainably. But we have to start now! 

Followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Jeremy Seifert, Justin Freiberg, and Tara Cook-Littman.

About the Filmmaker

In 2010, Jeremy completed his debut film, DIVE!, Living Off America’s Waste. Initially made with a $200 budget, a borrowed camera, and a lot of heart, DIVE! went on to win 22 film festivals worldwide - including screening at EFFY 2010. With the release of DIVE!, Jeremy began the production company, Compeller Pictures.  He is now a filmmaker and activist, traveling the country and speaking on humanitarian and environmental issues. Jeremy’s second film, GMO OMG, tells the hidden story of the take over of our food supply by giant chemical companies, an agricultural crisis that has grown into a cultural crisis. He has once again found the heart of the project in his own journey and awakening. Jeremy and his wife, Jen, live in North Carolina with their three children, Finn (7), Scout (4), and Pearl (2). 

Preceded By: Mushroom Man

3 min. Dir. Leslie Iwerks. This is the story of how mushrooms can save the world! Renowned mycologist and mushroom pioneer Paul Stamets harnesses the power of infamous fungi to fight the planet’s leading problems, from developing cures for cancer to destroying toxic radioactive waste.

Watch the Trailer for GMO OMG:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2013
Running Time: 90 min.

Website: gmofilm.com 

Director: Jeremy Seifert
Producers: Joshua A. Kunau, Jeremy Seifert
Executive Producers: Elizabeth Kucinich, Joshua A. Kunau
Director of Photography: Rod Hassler
Editor: Jeremy Seifert, Terry Yates


Musicwood


Connecticut Premiere

Monday, April 8th, 6:30pm
Yale Art Gallery Auditorium, 1111 Chapel St. (entrance on High St.)

Watch this evening's events online
Livestreamed on YouTube

For hundreds of years guitars have been made the same way... but now, that could all change. A band of famous guitar-makers (Bob Taylor, Chris Martin and Dave Berryman of Gibson) travel together into a primeval rain forest. Their mission: negotiate with Native American loggers before it’s too late for acoustic guitars. The result is the funny, complex and heartbreaking story of a profound cultural conflict and a battle over natural resources. Artists featured in the film: Kaki King, Steve Earle, Yo La Tengo, The Antlers, Lampchop, Turin Brakes and Sergius Gregory.

Followed by a panel discussion with filmmaker Maxine Trump, Nick Colesanti, and Kathryn Dudley.

About the Filmmaker

Maxine started her career in television in 1993, her last position in the UK before emigrating to the US was working for the BBC Comedy and Entertainment department as their TV Development Executive.

She trained as a fine artist, and won accolades at the IFC Hollywood Film Festival for her short Film “Silent Life”. With her fine art background, she often brings her artist sensibility to productions, whether it’s designing BDA-winning animation opens for BBC America or directing shoots for Sundance Channel’s “The Green.”

Her British roots have often been used to promote PBS shows, but she’s just as comfortable using her comedy roots to write scripts for Comedy Central. She has worked on long-form shows for Animal Planet and BBC America, interstitials for Sundance Channel, short films for TNT, promotions and concepting for National Geographic, TLC, Comedy Central, TV One, PBS and advertising campaigns for agency clients.

Watch this evening's events online
Livestreamed on YouTube

Preceded By: Yukon Kings

7 min. Directed by Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee. Set in the remote Alaskan Yukon Delta, Yukon Kings follows Yup'ik fisherman Ray Waska as he teaches his grandkids how to fish during the summer salmon run. With environmental and cultural forces threatening their subsistence way of life, Ray holds onto the hope that his grandsons will one day pass on the traditional knowledge to their children.

Watch the Trailer for Musicwood:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 80 min.

Website: musicwoodthefilm.com

Director: Maxine Trump
Producers: Josh Granger, Maxine Trump
Director of Photography: Curt Wallin
Editor: Josh Granger


Speakers 2012


Colin Beavan

No Impact Project

Live in person, April 11th, 6:00pm, Kroon Hall, Rm 321.

Colin Beavan is a former communications consultant for nonprofits turned book writer, blogger, and activist. In 2006, his No Impact Man experiment exploded in the media after being featured in the New York Times, and he has since come to be considered one of the spokespeople for the environmental movement. He writes and administers the provocative environmental blog noimpactman.typepad.com, which has become a meeting point for discussion of environmental issues from a “deep green” perspective. He is an advisor to NYU’s Sustainability Task Force, board member of Transportation Alternatives and advisor to Just Food. He was named one of MSN’s Ten Most Influential Men of 2007, one of Elle Magazine’s 2008 Eco-Illuminators, and his blog was named one of the world’s top 15 environmental websites by Time Magazine.

Visit noimpactproject.org for more on Colin and the No Impact Project.


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Laura Bozzi

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Laura Bozzi is a doctoral candidate at Yale University's School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. With grounding in institutional theory and public policy scholarship, her research focuses on the history of policy change and political conflict surrounding mountaintop removal and surface coal mining in central Appalachia. In all her work, she looks to uncover the historical drivers to environmental problems and to identify strategies for achieving durable solutions.


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Roger Cohn

Moderating a discussion after the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Editor, Yale Environment 360

Roger Cohn is the editor of Yale Environment 360, an award-winning online magazine focusing on global environmental issues that is published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has emerged as a leading international source of reporting, analysis, opinion, and discussion on the environment, with more than 2 million visitors in the last year in 219 countries and territories. Cohn developed this pioneering Web publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and it has received widespread recognition and numerous honors, including the National Magazine Award for Digital Media for Best Video and the Online Journalism Award for Best Specialty Site. Yale Environment 360 also co-produced and exclusively featured The Warriors of Qiugang, a video about a Chinese village’s battle against a polluting chemical plant that was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and showed at EFFY 2011.

Cohn formerly served as editor-in-chief of Mother Jones and executive editor of Audubon, revitalizing both magazines. Prior to that, he was a staff writer with The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was among the first U.S. journalists to establish an environmental beat. His writing on the environment and other issues has appeared in various publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and Outside. A graduate of Yale College, he has been an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and has served as a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and lectured at various universities, including Columbia, Stanford, and New York University.


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Sir Peter Crane FRS

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and Professor of Botany.

Moderating a discussion after the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dean Crane is the Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is known internationally for his work on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was Director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the Museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today comprise the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was Director of The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation and public programs. Professor Crane was elected to the Royal Society – the UK academy of sciences in 1998. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the German Academy Leopoldina.  He was knighted in the UK for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. 

Professor Crane currently serves on the Boards of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S., the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.


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Gwyneth Cravens

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Gwyneth Cravens is an American novelist and journalist. To date, she has published five novels. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New Yorker, where she also worked as a fiction editor, and in Harper’s Magazine, where she was an associate editor. She has contributed articles and editorials on science and other topics to Harper’s Magazine, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Her newest book, Power to Save the World: The Truth About Nuclear Energy, was released in October 2007 and argues for nuclear power as a safe energy source and an essential preventive of global warming.


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Harold Crooks

Director of Surviving Progress

Discussing the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Harold Crooks is an author and writer/producer whose award-winning and acclaimed documentary film credits include: The Corporation; Karsh Is History; Pax Americana And The Weaponization of Space; The World Is Watching; Bhopal: The Search for Justice; and the TV series Black Coffee. He is a recipient of a Genie Award of the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television; a Gold Hugo at the Chicago International Film Festival; a Leo Award for Best Screenwriter (Documentary) of the Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Foundation of B.C.; a National Documentary Film Award (Best Writing Category) at 1996 Hot Docs!; a Writers Guild of Canada Top Ten Awards finalist; a Commonwealth Fellowship, India; and a Fund for Investigative Journalism (Washington, DC) travel grant.


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Eric Desatnik

Exec Producer of The Whale and co-founder of the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY)

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Eric Desatnik currently manages communications for the international wildlife conservation organization, WildAid. Prior to joining WildAid, Eric Desatnik managed corporate sustainability initiatives at a Texas-based real estate development firm, worked on a team to "green" Yale's Athletics Department at the University's Office of Sustainability, and founded the Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY). For his work on EFFY, he was named one of Variety's "Standout Students" of 2010. His Communications experience includes a Junior Publicist position at BWR Public Relations, coordinating campaigns for clients including Brad Pitt, Adam Sandler, and Reese Witherspoon. He also worked at Management 360, a top tier talent management company, and in the marketing department of George Magazine. Eric holds a Master of Environmental Management degree from F&ES and is certified as a LEED Accredited Professional by the U.S. Green Building Council.


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Cara Donovan

CitySeed

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Cara Donovan is currently serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA at CitySeed. As the Volunteer and Outreach Coordinator she works with CitySeed and other New Haven community partners to ensure that low-income communities of New Haven receive better access to healthy food information, higher intakes of fresh fruits and vegetables and easier access to those foods. She is focusing on increasing SNAP enrollment for eligible New Haven residents and encouraging those SNAP dollars to be used on healthy, local food. Donovan is also working on creating sustainability for CitySeed through fund development and grant writing. She graduated from Connecticut College in 2008 where she co-chaired Sprout, the student run organic garden for 3 years. She is a native Rhode Islander but has lived in New Haven for most of the past 4 years. Donovan also worked as a Health Education intern for Rainforest Flow in the native community of Tayakome, Peru in 2010, planning and facilitating experimental gardens with women.


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Jeffrey Flocken

Director, the International Fund for Animal Welfare

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeffrey Flocken is the DC Office Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare where he leads the organization’s team of legislative professionals advocating for U.S. policy initiatives on behalf of wildlife conservation and animal welfare, including efforts on behalf of species such as whales, elephants, and lions. Before this appointment, Flocken worked for five years as an International Affairs Specialist in the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s Division of International Conservation, where he focused on international species conservation policy, outreach, and global conservation grant programs. Flocken has served as a consultant on numerous movies, books and television shows addressing wildlife conservation topics. Flocken currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Jaguar Conservation Fund, and the Steering Committee for the IUCN Tapir Specialist Group. Flocken is also the founder and Board co-Chair of the Emerging Wildlife Conservation Leaders initiative which mentors and provides campaign training for up-and-coming leaders in the wildlife field. He is also the coauthor of the book Wildlife Heroes, published by Running Press in March 2012.


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Paul Gallay

President of Riverkeeper

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Paul Gallay is an attorney, educator and non-profit executive working to protect community character and improve environmental sustainability. After a brief stint in private law practice, Gallay served for a dozen years in the New York State Attorney General’s Environmental Protection Bureau and at the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, helping to close Fresh Kills landfill, raise standards at NYC wastewater treatment plants and bring hundreds of corporate and government polluters to justice. After leaving public service, Gallay spent over a decade as an executive in the land conservation movement in New York and Maine, protecting thousands of acres of sensitive land, expanding the constituency for land conservation and promoting sustainable development practices. Now, as President of Riverkeeper, Gallay fights for a cleaner Hudson and safer drinking water for over nine million New Yorkers. Gallay received degrees from Williams College and Columbia Law School. He was a visiting professor of environmental studies at Williams from 2004 to 2007. He lives in Ossining, New York.


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Aaron Gerow

Assoc. Professor of Film Studies and East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Aaron Gerow arrived at Yale in January 2004 and teaches undergraduate courses in Japanese cinema, introduction to film, close analysis of film, and film genre, as well as graduate seminars on Japanese film and cultural theory. He received a MFA in film studies from Columbia University in 1987, a MA in Asian Civilizations from the University of Iowa in 1992, and a PhD in Communication Studies from Iowa in 1996. He spent nearly 12 years in Japan working for the Yamagata International Documentary Film Festival and teaching at Yokohama National University and Meiji Gakuin University. He has published numerous articles in English, Japanese and other languages on such topics as Japanese early cinema, film theory, contemporary directors, film genre, censorship, Japanese manga, and cinematic representations of minorities. His book on Kitano Takeshi was published by the BFI in 2007, A Page of Madness came out from the Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan in 2008, and Visions of Japanese Modernity: Articulations of Cinema, Nation, and Spectatorship, 1895-1925, was published in 2010 (the Japanese version will be coming out from the University of Tokyo Press). He also co-authored the Research Guide to Japanese Film Studies with Abe Mark Nornes (Center for Japanese Studies, 2009).


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Fredrik Gertten

Director of Big Boys Gone Bananas!* and Bananas!*

Discussing his film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Fredrik Gertten is an award winning director and journalist based in Malmö, Sweden. In 1994 he founded the production company WG Film. Before he worked as a foreign correspondent and columnist for radio, TV and press in Africa, Latin America, Asia and around Europe. Today he combines film making with a role as a creative producer on WG Film – famous for local stories with a global understanding, with several films catching the identity and transformation of his hometown. Featuring international stars like footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic in True Blue - The Way Back and architect Santiago Calatrava in The Socalist, the Architect and the Twisted Tower, among others. Dole Food company made his film BANANAS!* controversial by suing the company, producer and director. The fight for the film and freedom of speech won international recognition. In Sweden awarded with several prices including the Anna Politkovskaya freedom of speech award.


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Andrew Grace

Director of Eating Alabama

Discussing his film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Andrew Beck Grace was born and raised in north Alabama. He is an independent documentary filmmaker whose films have aired on Public Television stations and at film festivals across the country. He received an MA in American Studies from the University of Wyoming where he made his first documentary feature about the reenactments of Custer’s Last Stand in southern Montana. After a few years in the West, making films, freelancing for magazines and working as a producer for NPR News, he moved back to his home state to tell stories about the Deep South. At The University of Alabama he teaches and oversees a unique interdisciplinary social justice documentary program called Documenting Justice, and was recently named by The Oxford American one of the “Most Creative Teachers in the South.” In 2009 he was invited to attend the CPB/PBS Producers Academy at WGBH. He's also a writer whose nonfiction has been nominated for a Puschcart Prize.


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Ronald Gregg

Senior Lecturer and Programming Director, Film Studies

Moderating a discussion after the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Ron Gregg is Senior Lecturer and Programming Director in the Film Studies Program. As a Senior Lecturer, he teaches courses on queer cinema (both Hollywood and avant-garde), classical Hollywood, and the impact of globalization and digital technology on recent Hollywood film. As Programming Director, he organizes an annual series of campus visits and workshops by filmmakers and scholars and also works with other FSP faculty to organize major film conferences and other events. Before joining the Yale faculty, he taught film history at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, St. Cloud State University, and Duke University. He has published articles on topics ranging from MGM’s management of the image of its 1920s gay star William Haines to queer representation in the competing videos produced during Oregon's 1992 anti-gay rights ballot measure campaign. He has also curated film and video programming for the Chicago Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, the South African Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, Chicago's Gerber-Hart Gay and Lesbian Library, and the University of Chicago Lesbian and Gay Studies Project. He received his Ph.D. in Cinema Studies from the University of Oregon.


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John Grim

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

John Grim is currently a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges.  He is Coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions.  In that series he edited Indigenous Traditions and Ecology: the Interbeing of Cosmology and Community (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include: The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” John is also President of the American Teilhard Association.


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Lori Gruen

Chair and Professor of Philosophy, and Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Lori Gruen has been involved in animal issues as a writer, teacher, and activist for over 25 years. Her relationships with scholars thinking about animals, activists working to protect animals, and, perhaps most importantly, with many different animals, uniquely inform her perspective on how we need to rethink our engagement with other animals.  

Gruen is trained as a philosopher and works broadly on topics in practical ethics and political philosophy.  She has taught at the University of Colorado, the University of British Columbia, Lafayette College, the University of North Carolina, Stanford University, New York University, and Wesleyan University. She has published and lectured widely on topics in animal ethics, including the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy entry on the Moral Status of Non-Human Animals and the illustrated book Animal Liberation: A Graphic Guide (with Peter Singer and artist David Hines). She is currently working on a book exploring human relations to captive chimpanzees which draws lessons from the lives of some of the chimpanzees she has come to know, respect, and love.
lorigruen.com


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Maria Gunnoe

Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Maria Gunnoe is a community outreach and Issue organizer for OVEC and a life-long resident of Southern West Virginia who has experienced the destruction of mountaintop removal first-hand. Her family home place, where she currently resides, has sustained repeated flood damage caused by run-off from a nearby valley fill. She has traveled extensively nationwide to speak about the dire situation in Appalachian coalfields and is encouraging Americans to help protect Appalachian communities and our nation’s oldest mountains. Gunnoe has successfully stopped MTR operation near her home in 2007 and again in 2012 saving 100's of acres of mountain peaks and miles of streams. She’s appeared in several documentaries, including Burning the Future, Coal in America which focuses on her community organizing, Dirty Business, and most recently The Last Mountain, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival; Gunnoe attended and spoke at the premier. Gunnoe has also been featured in major newspaper articles including the Washington Post, NY Times, Time, and More Magazine. In July 2006, Gunnoe was featured in Oprah’s magazine—“O.” She is a 2006 recipient of the Joe Calloway Award for Civic Courage created by the Washington DC-based Shafeek Nader Trust for The Community.  She received the Rain Forest Action Network’s David vs. Goliath award for her efforts to create a sustainable world.  In March 2008, Gunnoe was selected as Sierra club's law program hero. In April 2009, Gunnoe was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. On February 28, 2010 she received the David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award from the Land, Air, Water Association, the nation's oldest student environmental law society, for her work to end mountaintop removal mining. Gunnoe also serves on the board of directors of SouthWings, a non-profit organization that provides free over-flights of mountaintop removal sites and other environmental disasters such as the Gulf oil spill. www.ohvec.org


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Bill Haney

Director of The Last Mountain.

Update: Bill Haney can no longer join us for the showing of The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Bill Haney has written, produced and directed award winning documentary and narrative features for ten years. He is co-founder of Uncommon Productions. His most recent feature documentary, The Price of Sugar, which he wrote, produced and directed, was short-listed for an Academy Award, nominated for the NAACP’s Image Award and was the recipient of numerous other honors, including the Gabriel Award and the Audience Award at South by Southwest. The documentary A Life Among Whales, which he directed and produced, takes a look at one man’s lifelong passion for the wild and won numerous awards including a Silver Hugo and the Earthwatch Film Award.

In addition to filmmaking, Haney is founder of the eco-housing startup Blu Homes, using advanced technology to make housing greener, healthier and more affordable.  He is also chairman of World Connect, a non-profit supporting programs to help women and children in 400 developing world villages.


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William Kelly

Professor of Anthropology and Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Kelly is a noted authority on the social and historical anthropology of Japan. Kelly has focused much of his research in the last two decades on regional agrarian societies in Japan. After earning a B.A. in Anthropology from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in Sociocultural Anthropology from Brandeis University, Kelly joined the faculty at Yale in 1980. He has served as Chair for the Department of Anthropology, Chair for the Council on East Asian Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies for East Asian Studies. Kelly is currently a member of the executive committees for the Council on East Asian Studies, Council on Southeast Asia Studies and Program on Agrarian Studies. He is also a member of the steering committee of Yale College and a faculty affiliate of the Peabody Museum of Natural History. His professional affiliations include membership in the American Anthropological Association, American Ethnological Society, Society for Cultural Anthropology, Association for Asian Studies and the editorial board of the Journal of Japanese Studies.


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Dan Klau

Attorney

Discussing the film Big Boys Gone Bananas!*, April 12th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dan Klau is an attorney in the Hartford office of McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney & Carpenter. He graduated from Boston University School of Law, summa cum laude, in 1990, and then began his career as a law clerk to Chief Justice Ellen A. Peters of the Connecticut Supreme Court. His practice focuses on appellate and First Amendment (particularly media law) litigation. He also litigates a broad variety of complex disputes involving commercial and private parties in federal and state trial courts. As an appellate advocate, he has represented clients in the United State Supreme Court, the United States Courts of Appeal for the First and Second Circuits, and the Connecticut Supreme and Appellate courts. His media practice includes representing newspapers and other publishing entities in defamation matters and cases seeking access to court proceedings and files.

Dan is also an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where he teaches privacy law. He is frequently quoted on First Amendment and privacy issues, is the author of numerous articles and columns on appellate practice and First Amendment issues, and is a frequent lecturer on these topics. Dan is currently president of Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. He has received numerous awards for his work on behalf of government access and transparency, including the Society of Professional Journalist's 2009 Helen M. Loy Freedom of Information Award, the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information's 2007 Stephen Collins Award and the Connecticut Bar Association's 2007 "Pro Bono" Award. He has been recognized as a Connecticut and New England "Super Lawyer" in the area of appellate practice. Dan is a James W. Cooper Fellow of the Connecticut Bar Foundation and is a past member of the Board of Directors of the Hartford County Bar Association. Dan was the keynote speaker at the Freedom of Information Commission's 2009 Annual Conference.


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Roy Lee

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Roy Lee  joined the United Nations in 1967 in the Division of Human Rights. In 1972, he joined the law of the sea Secretariat and became Secretary of the First Committee of the Third U.N. Conference on the Law of the Sea. In 1982, upon completion of his assignment, he moved to the Office of Legal Affairs as Principal Legal Officer in the Office of the Legal Counsel.  He is currently Director of the Codification Division in the Office of Legal Affairs and also acts as Secretary of the International Law Commission and of the Sixth (Legal) Committee of the General Assembly and of three other law-making bodies.

He has taught international law and relations in various law schools in Europe, Asia, Latin America, the United States and Canada. He is co-author of a "Manual on Space Law"  and co-editor of "New Directions in the Law of the Sea" and has published some 30 articles on law of the sea, human rights, nuclear energy, settlement of disputes, ocean management, humanitarian law, terrorism and the question of war crimes and crimes against humanity.  In 1997, he co-edited a book on "Increasing the Effectiveness of the International Court of Justice".

Lee holds a law degree from China, earned a Master of Law in International Law from McGill University in 1962, and received a Ph.D in International Law from the University of London in 1967.


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Kelly McMasters

Author

Discussing the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Kelly McMasters is the author of Welcome to Shirley: A Memoir from an Atomic Town. The book was listed as one of Oprah's top 5 summer memoirs and is the basis for the documentary film The Atomic States of America, playing at EFFY 2012 and a 2012 Sundance selection. Her essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post Magazine, River Teeth: A Journal of Narrative Nonfiction, Newsday, Time Out New York, and MrBellersNeighborhood.com, among others. She holds an MFA in nonfiction writing from Columbia's School of the Arts and is the recipient of a Pushcart nomination and an Orion Book Award nomination. McMasters teaches at mediabistro.com and in the undergraduate writing program and Journalism Graduate School at Columbia University. She splits her time between Manhattan and northeast Pennsylvania, where she lives with her two sons and husband, the painter Mark Milroy.


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Alan Mikhail

Assistant Professor, History, Yale University

Discussing the film Bestiaire, April 15th, 1:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Alan Mikhail is a historian of the early modern Muslim world, the Ottoman Empire, and Egypt whose research and teaching focus mostly on the nature of early modern imperial rule, peasant histories, environmental resource management, and science and medicine.

His first book, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt: An Environmental History (Cambridge University Press, 2011), won the 2009-11 Roger Owen Book Award from the Middle East Studies Association and the 2011 Samuel and Ronnie Heyman Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Publication from Yale University and was named a book of the year by Ahram Online.

Professor Mikhail is currently writing a book about the changing relationships between humans and animals in Ottoman Egypt and also completing an edited volume on the environmental history of the Middle East, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2013.


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Barry Muchnick

Discussing the film The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Barry Muchnick is an environmental historian whose research and teaching revolve around the idea that history looks very different when considered in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together. Currently teaching at Quinnipiac University, Barry recently completed his dissertation, “Nature’s Republic: Fresh Air Reform and The Moral Ecology of Citizenship in Turn of the Century America” in a joint Ph.D. program of his own design between Yale’s History Department and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to arriving in New Haven, Barry worked on a multi-year grizzly bear census in Montana’s Glacier National Park, radio-tracked desert tortoises in Nevada’s Mojave Desert for the U.S.G.S. Biological Survey, and led field excursions for the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota. His interest in the cultural and historical dimensions of natural resources led him from the outdoors to the archives, where he continues to study the intersection of social justice and nature conservation. He has lectured widely on British landscape painting and environmental ethics; environmental citizenship; the interconnections of science, technology, and sentiment; nature and national identity; and natural disaster.


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Jeremy Oldfield

Interim Farm Coordinator, Yale Sustainable Food Project

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Jeremy Oldfield’s food and farming experience includes growing specialty greens at a six acre organic operation in Petaluma, California, and fermenting locally grown vegetables at the Cultured Pickle Shop in Berkeley, California. He spent 2006 working for Eliot Coleman at his Four Season Farm in Maine. Most recently, he founded The Freelance Farmers, a company that helped both schools and homeowners install productive vegetable gardens. Jeremy enjoys teaching urban dwellers about the delights of soil ecology and food production. He graduated from Williams College in 2005 with a degree in American Studies, and completed his MFA in Writing and Literature at the Bennington Writing Seminars.


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Ann Powers

Associate Professor of Law, Pace Law School

Discussing the film The Island President on Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Ann Powers is a faculty member of the Center for Environmental Legal Studies, where she teaches a range of environmental courses focusing on the law of oceans & coasts, international environmental law, UN diplomacy and water quality. Her scholarship includes emerging ocean issues and water pollution trading programs, among other subjects. Professor Powers’ recent work has focused particularly on ocean and international issues, and she has worked with United Nations Environment Program projects, and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Commission on Environmental Law and its Law Academy.  She chairs the Land-based Pollution Subcommittee of the Commission’s Oceans, Coasts & Coral Reefs Specialist Group.

Until joining the Center in 1995, she was vice president and general counsel of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, a major regional non-profit environmental organization, where she supervised the Foundation’s legal work and its pollution control advocacy program. Professor Powers also served as a senior trial attorney in the Environmental Enforcement Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, handling both civil and criminal cases, and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia.


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James Saiers

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Professor of Hydrology; Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Professor of Chemical Engineering

Moderating a discussion after the film The Atomic States of America, April 13th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Professor Saiers studies the circulation of water and the movement of waterborne chemicals in surface and subsurface environments. One element of his research centers on quantifying the effects that interactions between hydrological and geochemical processes have on the migration of contaminants in groundwater. Another focus is on the dynamics of surface water and groundwater flow in wetlands and the response of fluid flow characteristics to changes in climate and water management practices. His work couples field observations and laboratory-scale experimentation with mathematical modeling.


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Monique Stefani

Discussing the film Eating Alabama, April 10th, 7:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Monique Stefani is interested in understanding issues around food security and the global food system. She completed her doctoral dissertation in sociology in December 2009 at The State University of New York, Stony Brook, studying how nations became interested in investing in the biotechnology industry in the 1970s and 1980s. She’s currently working on food security data from the Kamuli District in Uganda. She is on the New Haven Food Policy Council, working on a number of locally based food system projects, including a map of the New Haven food system. Her research concentration is in cultural theory and sociology of technology. Her goal is to situate her work in between academic research and local involvement.


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Kristin Tracz

Research and policy associate with Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED)

Discussing the film The Last Mountain, April 11th, 7:30pm, Kroon Hall

Kristin Tracz joined MACED in June 2010 after finishing her Master of Environmental Management degree at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Tracz works closely on energy efficiency and renewable energy policy in Kentucky and Central Appalachia and supports the Appalachian Transition Initiative. Prior to graduate school, Tracz was a Senior Program Associate for the Blue Moon Fund in Charlottesville, Virginia, working with rural economic development projects throughout Asia. A Virginia native, with a B.A. from the University of Virginia, she is happy to be away from the cold winters of the Northeast. Visit MACED.org and http://www.appalachiantransition.org.


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Mary Evelyn Tucker

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale University

Moderating a discussion after the film Surviving Progress, April 9th, 7:00pm, Yale Art Gallery

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School and the Department of Religious Studies. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. She is also Research Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard. She is the author of Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase (Open Court Press, 2003), Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism (SUNY, 1989) and The Philosophy of Qi (Columbia University Press, 2007). She co-edited Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994), Buddhism and Ecology (Harvard, 1997), Confucianism and Ecology (Harvard, 1998), and Hinduism and Ecology (Harvard, 2000) and When Worlds Converge (Open Court, 2002). With Tu Weiming she edited two volumes on Confucian Spirituality (Crossroad, 2004). She also co-edited a Daedalus volume titled Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change? (2001). She edited several of Thomas Berry’s books: Evening Thoughts (Sierra Club Books and University of California Press, 2006), The Sacred Universe (Columbia University Press, 2009), Christian Future and the Fate of Earth (Orbis Book, 2009). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). She served on the International Earth Charter Drafting Committee from 1997-2000 and is a member of the Earth Charter International Council. B.A. Trinity College, M.A. SUNY Fredonia, M.A. Fordham University, PhD Columbia University.


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Allison D. Tuttle

Staff Veterinarian & Director of Animal Care, Mystic Aquarium

Discussing the film The Whale, April 15th, 6:00pm, Whitney Humanities Center

Dr. Allison Tuttle graduated with a DVM from North Carolina State University in 2002. Following graduation, Allison completed a 2-year Internship in Aquatic Animal Medicine at Mystic Aquarium. Allison also completed a Residency in Zoological Medicine with an Aquatic Health Management focus at North Carolina State University in 2007. During the residency, Allison was part of a team providing medical care to the 3 North Carolina Aquariums, the North Carolina Zoological Park, the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Hospital and for stranded marine mammals along the North Carolina coast. Allison returned to Mystic Aquarium in fall 2007 to assume the role of Staff Veterinarian and Director of Animal Care and enjoys providing medical care to the wide variety of species housed at the Aquarium. She is also involved with clinical research pertaining to the health of our animal collection. Allison’s main medical interests relate to infectious disease and preventative medicine.


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David Watts

Professor, Department of Anthropology, Yale University

Hosting a question and answer session after the film Chimpanzee, April 15th, 11:00am, Bow-Tie Criterion Cinema

Professor David Watts’ research speciality is the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates. He has done fieldwork in Panama (behavior of white-faced capuchin monkeys), Rwanda (behavioral ecology of mountain gorillas), and Uganda (behavioral ecology of chimpanzees). He was the Director of the Karisoke Research Centre in Rwanda for two years. In collaboration with Dr. Jeremiah Lwanga and Dr. John Mitani, he has maintained a research project on chimpanzee behavior at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda since 1995. He teaches courses on primate behavior and ecology, evolutionary approaches to human behavior, cognitive ethology, nonhuman primate models for human evolution, hunter-gatherer societies, and primate conservation. His graduate students have done research on a wide range of topics, including chimpanzee behavior; behavioral ecology of red colobus monkeys, black-and-white colobus monkeys, and spider monkeys; positional behavior of old world monkeys; chimpanzee behavioral endocrinology; the evolutionary genetics of gorillas; and the population genetics and mating system of sifakas.


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Click here to see the speakers from EFFY 2011


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Young Filmmakers & Photographers Contest


And the Winners Are...

As part of a series of initiatives to bring environmental messages to new audiences, EFFY successfully launched its first-annual Young Filmmakers Contest and Photographers Contests receiving submissions from students of high schools, colleges and universities across the country. After the intense scrutiny of Veteran filmmakers - Hunter Snyder, Richard Miron, Chandra Simon – and Photographers Kike Calvo, Anthony Clark and Matthew Garrett the following have emerged as finalists and winners:

Young Filmmakers: 


Winners:

Secondary: "Trespassing Nature," Javier Storch, Dr. Michael M. Krop Senior High School, FL

Post-Secondary: "Magician's Favor," Jeremy H. Hung, Chapman University, CA

Finalists:

"The Immigrant," Omar Malik, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, CT

"Parks and ReCreation," Brent Sievers, Rhode Island School of Design, RI

Films will screen during the Shorts Program I on Saturday, April 13th at noon. 

Young Photographers:


Winners:


Secondary: "The Common Chicken," Kathiana Torres, Common Ground High School, CT

Post Secondary: "Water Amour," Geoff Giller, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, CT

Finalists:


"Eat Yourself," Eileen Huang, Yale University, CT

"Beautiful Sorrow," Hailey Marie Shadle, DeKalb School of the Arts, GA

"Black Water," Michael Herrin, Chattahoochee High School, GA 

"Contamination Face to Face," Nairobi Jeanniton, Riverdale Country School, NY

"Garbage in the Townships," Austin Hopkins, Quinnipiac University, CT

"King of the Hill," Geoff Giller, CT

"Olive Ridley Rescue," Sonali Bhasin, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, CT

"Oyster Harvest," Geoff Giller, CT

"Toad's Domain," Geoff Giller, CT

"Tree's Own Valleys," Alyssa Bentley, Roswell High School, GA

"Scars," Stephanie Stefanski, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, CT

"Summer Night," Taylor Gatison, New Haven Academy, CT

Photographs will display in the Timothy Dwight Art Gallery for the duration of EFFY. Click here for more info. An online gallery will be available on Facebook for the duration of EFFY to select the Audience Favorite Award. Like your favorite photo!

Congratulations to all our winners and finalists!

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RULES

 

Photography Contest Rules

Photos must depict or address an environmental issue, and be accompanied by a brief description. All entries must have been produced within the past 18 months. Submission to the contest is free and entries can be submitted by completing the online entry form provided below. Photos will be displayed in a gallery space in New Haven during the festival. EFFY reserves the right to print copies of winning photographs for the event. Multiple submissions are welcome; all entries must be received by February 28th. 

A jury comprised of Yale professors, and professional photographers will select finalists based on composition and audience appeal. The Audience Favorite award will be determined by an internet gallery of the finalists’ pictures. Finalists will also receive free entrance to workshops during EFFY. Winners in each category will receive additional awards from EFFY to be announced shortly. The Environmental Film Festival at Yale is excited to see the creative talent of the next generation of photographers! 

For entrants: 

  • Entrants must be aged 25 or younger 
  • Photos must have been produced within the past 18 months 
  • Applicants for the contest must submit using this form.

 

Filmmaking Contest Rules

Films must depict or address an environmental issue. The maximum length for submissions is 5 minutes. All entries must have been produced within the past 18 months. Submission to the con- test is free and entries can be submitted by completing the online entry form provided below. Multiple submissions are welcome; all entries must be received by February 28th

A jury comprised of Yale professors, and film industry representatives will select finalists based on storytelling, film making techniques, and audience appeal. All finalists will screen in a spe- cial session at EFFY 2013. The audience will vote on winners in each category. Finalists will also receive entrance to filmmaking workshops during EFFY. Winners in each category will receive additional awards from EFFY to be announced shortly. The Environmental Film Festival at Yale is excited to see the creative talent of the next generation of filmmakers! 

For entrants:

  • Entrants must be aged 25 or younger  
  • Films must have been produced within the past 18 months
  • Maximum submission length of 5 minutes 
  • Applicants for the contest must submit using this form.
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Juries

Photography

Kike Calvo: Award-winning photographer, journalist, and author Kike Calvo was born in Spain, has traveled in more than 85 countries, and transformed his fascination with Latin America into a career focus.  He is an expert for National Geographic Expeditions and a freelancer for the New York Times.  His cultural and environmental documentary photography has also been published in National Geographic, Time, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, New York Magazine,Rolling Stone, and Vanity Fair, as well as other publications.(http://www.kikecalvo.com, Instagram: KIKEO, Twitter: kikecalvo)

Anthony Clark: Anthony Clark is a joint MEM/MBA student at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Management where his work integrates life cycle environmental thinking, behavioral economics, and innovative approaches to policy and finance. Prior to Yale, Anthony worked at the Natural Resources Defense Council and oversaw development of science and policy publications and coordinated communications efforts connected to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. A graduate of Wesleyan University and a native of Poughkeepsie, NY, Anthony is an accomplished photographer whose work has brought him to the wildlands of Montana, the East Room of the White House, a communist statue park in Hungary, and the site of an abandoned amusement park in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Matthew Garrett: Matthew Garrett has been deeply involved with photography since 1985 and, after receiving a BFA, he continued his education by working for commercial photographers for almost 10 years. He then transitioned to web development for a very image-driven client list of photographers and architects, and those sites won many national design awards in Photo District News, Graphis and other publications. He has continued to exhibit his photography as a founding member of Kehler Liddell Gallery, and has been a leader of New Haven's Photo Arts Collective for over 15 years.

Film

Hunter Snyder: Working in Northern New England and Greenland, Hunter's films question the relationships between land and labor.  Before coming to New Haven, he was Associate Producer of the Points North Documentary Forum at the Camden International Film Festival.  He is an organizer of the Screening Scholarship Media Festival, a core member of CAMRA at Penn, and an editor/producer with Senate Journal.  His work has screened at the Camden International Film Festival, on PBS, and at the Environmental Film Festival in Washington D.C.  At Yale, Hunter works in film archives with the Digital Himalaya Project.

Richard Miron: Richard has served as the Director of Programming for EFFY for the past two years, and holds a B.A. in Art from Yale University. His short films, both animated and documentary, have screened at numerous festivals around the US. He currently resides in Brooklyn, New York, where he works professionally as an editor, cinematographer, advisor, and programmer for documentary films.

Chandra Simon: Chandra Simon (MESc '12) is a filmmaker and educator based in San Francisco. She has produced a wide variety of award-winning films and national TV series. Her latest project, Cultivate, is a series of short films about farmers who are trying to change the food system.


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CONTACT: Elizabeth Babalola, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

For Immediate Release: 3/29/2013


EFFY Presents: Birders: The Central Park Effect



Special Screening


Friday, February 22nd, 2013, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street
 
Free and open to the public.


Birders: The Central Park Effect reveals the extraordinary array of wild birds who grace Manhattan’s celebrated patch of green, and the equally colorful New Yorkers who schedule their lives around the rhythms of migration. Author Jonathan Franzen, an idiosyncratic trombone technician, and a septuagenarian bird-tour leader are among the lively cast of characters in this charming, lyrical documentary that transports the viewer to the dazzling, hidden world of America’s most famous park.

Followed by a panel discussion with the filmmaker, Jeffrey Kimball, and Professor of Ornithology, Dr. Richard Prum.

Watch the Trailer: 



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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 60 min.

Website: centralparkbirdfilm.com

Director: Jeffrey Kimball
Producers: Jeffrey Kimball, Nick August-Perna (co-producer)
Executive Producers: Pamela Hogan, Tom Casciato
Cinematography: Tony Pagano, Nick August-Perna, Chris Dapkins
Editor: Daniel Baer, Nick August-Perna (co-editor)


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EFFY 2014 Submissions


EFFY is now accepting submissions via Withoutabox for our 6th annual festival, March 31 - April 6th, 2014. Please see our Withoutabox page for details and deadlines!

 

 

Environmental Film Festival at Yale prefers online entries submitted via Withoutabox.com, which provides cost-saving, paperless submission to film festivals around the world. Withoutabox’s internet-only submission platform features online applications via one master entry form, online fee payments, press kits, and the option to use Secure Online Screeners, an economical, eco-friendly, and secure alternative to traditional hard-copy DVD submissions. Click to submit your film today! 

[Withoutabox logos are trademarks of Withoutabox, a DBA of IMDb.com Inc. or its affiliates.]

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EFFY 2012 Winners


The Island President was named Best Feature film at the fourth annual Environmental Film Festival at Yale.

The film, about the world’s lowest-lying island nation threatened by rising sea levels, was selected by a jury of Yale faculty, students, staff and alumni.

Other top honors went to 663114, an animated film about the reemergence of a 66-year-old cicada moments before an earthquake and tsunami, which won Best Short film; Bestiaire, which explored the boundaries between nature and “civilization,” took home a Special Jury Prize; and The Whale, a documentary about an orca that forms a bond with people, was selected by filmgoers to receive the EFFY Audience Award.

In addition, the student-run festival, which ran from April 9th to 15th, included an advanced screening of Disneynature’s Chimpanzee, which will be released nationwide on April 20.

“It is amazing to see this entirely student-run festival reach this level of success,” said Sir Peter Crane, dean of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. “It has become one of the best ways that our school has been able to reach the broader community.”

The festival was sponsored by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Whitney Humanities Center, The Study at Yale, Class of 1980 Fund, and Graduate and Professional Student Senate at Yale.

 

Contact: Paul Thomson, 202-679-5494, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)   

 


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The Whale


Sunday, April 15th, 6:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

In 2001, a young orca named Luna lost contact with his family in Puget Sound and turned up near Vancouver Island in Nootka Sound. Without other whales to bond with, Luna began reaching out to the people in boats and living along the shore for companionship. Smart, friendly, and determined, Luna demanded human contact, and the residents of the Sound were happy to adopt him as their own. But as Luna’s story gained notoriety, fierce battles began between the Canadian government, NGOs who wished to return Luna to his family, the Mowachaht tribe who deemed Luna’s arrival as a sacred event, and those who were simply touched by Luna's apparent loneliness and charm.

Narrated by Ryan Reynolds and directed by two journalists who came to report a story but fell in love with a whale, The Whale is more than documentary. It is an exploration of the mysteries of friendship across forbidden boundaries, a friendship of haunting questions and few answers.

Followed by a discussion with executive producer and EFFY co-founder Erik Desatnik, Jeff Flocken, Director of the International Fund for Animal Welfare, and Allison D. Tuttle, Staff Veterinarian & Director of Animal Care at the Mystic Aquarium. Moderated by John Grim, Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale.

Preceded by: Homeless

3 min. A hermit crab looks for a home in this fun animated short.

Watch a Trailer of The Whale:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 85 Min.

Website: www.thewhalemovie.com

Directors: Suzanne Chisholm and Michael Parfit
Producers: Ryan Reynolds, Scarlett Johansson, Eric Desatnik, Suzanne Chisholm
Screenplay: Michael Parfit


Bestiaire


New England Premiere

Sunday, April 15th, 1:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

A popular sensation in medieval Europe, bestiaries were catalogs of beasts featuring exotic animal illustrations, zoological wisdom, and ancient legends. Denis Côté’s startling Bestiaire unfolds like a filmic picture book where both humans and animals are on display. As we observe them, they also observe us and one another, invoking the Hindu idea of darshan: a mutual beholding that initiates a shift in consciousness.

Fascinating, beguiling creatures like buffalo, hyenas, zookeepers, zebras, taxidermists, rhinos, and ostriches silently inhabit uncluttered, beautifully composed frames of a locked-off camera, conducting curious affairs in holding pens and fields. Their unself-consciousness before the camera’s eye renders them equally objectified. Whether we anthropomorphize, poeticize, abstract, or judge them is up to us. Côté invites his audience to reflect on control and power as lions rattle cages, a taxidermist recreates a duck, and artists copy a stuffed deer. Using the film form to challenge the very notion of representation, Bestiaire is an elegant, bewitching meditation on the nature of sentience and the boundaries between nature and “civilization.”

Followed by a discussion with Lori Gruen, Professor at Wesleyan University, and Alan Mikhail, Assistant Professor of History at Yale. Moderated by Ron Gregg, Senior Lecturer and Programming Director, Film Studies at Yale.

About the Filmmaker

Born in New Brunswick, Canada, Denis Côté produced and directed around 15 low-budget short films while working as a radio-show host and film critic for a Montreal cultural weekly. He was also vice president of the Association Québécoise des critiques de cinéma (Québec's Film Critics Association) from 2001 to 2006. His first feature film, Les états Nordiques (Drifting States) (2005), was awarded the Golden Leopard for video at the Locarno International Film Festival, and Elle veut le chaos (All That She Wants) (2008) earned him the best director award at Locarno. Curling won another best director award at Locarno in 2010.

Preceded By: Orbit: Look at the Sun

5 min. For thousands of years, humanity has watched the sun with a mixture of fear and awe, believing without knowing why, that our lives depend on its mysterious undulations.

Watch the Trailer of Bestiaire:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 72 Min.

Director: Denis Côté
Producer: Sylvain Corbeil
Cinematographer: Vincent Biron
Editor: Nicolas Roy
Sound: Frédéric Cloutier


Chimpanzee


Special Advance Screening

Sunday, April 15th, 11:00am
Bow-Tie Criterion Cinema

Disneynature takes moviegoers deep into the forests of Africa with Chimpanzee a new True Life Adventure introducing an adorable young chimp named Oscar and his entertaining approach to life in a remarkable story of family bonds and individual triumph. Oscar's playful curiosity and zest for discovery showcase the intelligence and ingenuity of some of the most extraordinary personalities in the animal kingdom. Working together, Oscar's chimpanzee family—including his mom and the group's savvy leader—navigates the complex territory of the forest.

The world is a playground for little Oscar and his fellow young chimps, who'd rather make mayhem than join their parents for an afternoon nap. But when Oscar's family is confronted by a rival band of chimps, he is left to fend for himself until a surprising ally steps in and changes his life forever. Directed by Alastair Fothergill (African Cats and Earth) and Mark Linfield (Earth), Chimpanzee swings into theaters on April 20, 2012.

Screening is complimentary and open to the public. Seating at this screening will be on a first come, first served basis and is not guaranteed. Question & answer session to follow with David Watts, Professor of Anthropology and primatologist at Yale.

About Disneynature

Disneynature, the first new Disney-branded film label from The Walt Disney Studios in more than 60 years, was launched in April 2008 to bring the world’s top nature filmmakers together to share a wide variety of wildlife subjects and stories with theatrical audiences. Earth (opening Earth Day 2009) was the first film to premiere domestically under the new label, and garnered a record-breaking opening weekend for a nature documentary. In 2010, Oceans was the third highest grossing feature-length nature film in history. Its “See ‘Oceans,’ Save Oceans” initiative helped establish 40,000 acres of marine protected area in The Bahamas, preserving essential coral reefs. African Cats was released in 2011. All three films had special Advance Screenings at the Environmental Film Festivals at Yale. For more information about the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, please visit Disney.com/conservation.

Check out the Friends For Change/Disneynature’s Chimpanzee Action Kit. Click here to download.


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Rated G
Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 78 min.

Website: Disney.com/Chimpanzee

Directors: Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield
Producers: Alastair Fothergill and Mark Linfield
Executive Producer: Don Hahn (Disneynature)
Principal Photography: Martyn Colbeck and Bill Wallauer
Principal Scientific Consultant: Christophe Boesch


EFFY After Dark



Saturday, 9:00pm @ GPSCY bar, 204 York St., 2nd floor ballroom

Join us in celebrating the wrap up of EFFY 2012 with live music, drink specials, and free food catered by Red Lentil. No cover. Open to the public (21+).

Featuring live music by MODERN MERCHANT.
DJ Philbo Shaggins will be playing some hot jams following the band.

modernmerchant.bandcamp.com


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Bear 71


Special Interactive Exhibition

Jeremy Mendes and Leanne Allison’s poignant interactive documentary about a bear in the Canadian Rockies illuminates the way humans engage with wildlife in the age of networks, satellites, and digital surveillance. You can use special iPads to become part of an interactive forest environment rich with bears, cougars, sheep, deer, and people as you follow an emotional story of a grizzly bear tagged and monitored by Banff National Park rangers.

This is EFFY's first interactive film exhibition. Come experience it for yourself at the Whitney Humanities Center room 208, 53 Wall Street, New Haven. Saturday and Sunday, April 14th and 15th.


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Genre: Interactive Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 30 min.

Director: Jeremy Mendes, Leanne Allison
Screenwriter: J. B. MacKinnon
Executive Producers: Loc Dao, Rob McLaughlin, David Christensen
Producers: Loc Dao, Rob McLaughlin (National Film Board of Canada); Dana Dansereau, Bonnie Thompson
Web Designer: Aubyn Freybe-Smith
Sound Designer: Josh Stevenson
Web Writer: Jennifer Moss


The Island President


Connecticut Premiere

Saturday, April 14th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Jon Shenk’s The Island President tells the story of President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, a man confronting a problem greater than any other world leader has ever faced—the literal survival of his country and everyone in it. After bringing democracy to the Maldives after thirty years of despotic rule, Nasheed is now faced with an even greater challenge: as one of the most low-lying countries in the world, a rise of three feet in sea level would submerge the 1200 islands of the Maldives enough to make them uninhabitable.

The Island President captures Nasheed’s first year of office, culminating in his trip to the Copenhagen Climate Summit in 2009, where the film provides a rare glimpse of the political horse-trading that goes on at such a top-level global assembly. Nasheed is unusually candid about revealing his strategies—leveraging the Maldives’ underdog position as a tiny country, harnessing the power of media, and overcoming deadlocks through an appeal to unity with other developing nations. When hope fades for a written accord to be signed, Nasheed makes a stirring speech which salvages an agreement. Despite the modest size of his country, Mohamed Nasheed has become one of the leading international voices for urgent action on climate change.

Followed by a panel discussion with Sir Peter Crane, Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Professor Roy Lee, and Ann Powers, Professor at the Pace Law School.

About the Filmmaker

Jon Shenk was the DP for the Academy Award-winning Smile Pinki (2009). He won an Emmy for Blame Somebody Else (2007, PBS/Exposé). Shenk directed and photographed Lost Boys of Sudan, Independent Spirit Award winner in 2004. He co-directed and photographed Democracy Afghan Style (2004). In 2005, he directed and photographed The New Heroes. Early in his career, he directed and photographed The Beginning (1999), a chronicle of George Lucas's Star Wars: Episode I. Shenk has produced and photographed dozens of documentaries for PBS, the BBC, A&E, Bravo, CBS, NBC, and National Geographic Television. He has been nominated twice for Emmys for his cinematography. He earned his Master’s degree in Documentary Filmmaking from Stanford University in 1995 and his Bachelor’s degree from Yale in 1991.

Preceded By: Acqua

8 min. A celebration of traditions, Acqua presents the quest for water partly as a necessity, partly as a solemn pilgrimage.

Watch the Trailer for The Island President:
 


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 101 min.

Website: theislandpresident.com

Director: Jon Shenk
Producers: Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen
Executive Producer: Jon Else
Director of Photography: Jon Shenk
Editor: Pedro Kos


The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom


Saturday, April 14th, 1:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Survivors in the hardest-hit areas of Japan's recent tsunami find the courage to revive and rebuild as cherry blossom season begins in this stunning visual haiku about the ephemeral nature of life and the healing power of Japan's most beloved flower.

Nominated for a 2012 Academy Award: Documentary (Short Subject).

Followed by a discussion with William Kelly, Professor of Japanese Studies at Yale, and environmental historian Barry Muchnick. Moderated by Aaron Gerow, Assoc. Professor of Film Studies and East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale.

About the Filmmaker

Prior to The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom, Lucy Walker directed four feature documentaries: Devil’s Playground, which premiered at the 2002 Festival and was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award; Blindsight, which premiered at Toronto in 2006; and Waste Land, which played at the 2011 Environmental Film Festival at Yale. Waste Land won the EFFY Audience Award and was nominated for an Academy Award, and Walker has also been nominated for five Emmys and a number of other honors. Walker grew up in London and graduated from Oxford University before winning a Fulbright Scholarship to attend NYU.

Preceded By: Chasing Water

20 min. In Chasing Water, photojournalist Peter McBride sets out to document the flow of the Colorado River from source to sea.

Watch the Trailer for The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 39 Min.

Website: thetsunamiandthecherryblossom.com

Director: Lucy Walker
Executive Producers: Tim Case, Charles V. Salice
Producers: Kira Carstensen, Lucy Walker
Associate Producers: Charleen Manca, Nicole Visram
Cinematographer: Aaron Phillips
Editor: Aki Mizutani
Music: Moby


The Atomic States of America


New England Premiere

Friday, April 13th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

The new documentary from Sheena Joyce and Don Argott, The Atomic States of America, takes the viewer on a journey to reactor communities around the country, and seeks to explore the truths and myths of nuclear power.

From the gates of Three Mile Island, to the cooling ponds of Braidwood, IL, this film introduces the viewer to people who have been on the front lines of this issue for decades.

Begun more than a year before the disaster in Japan, the deeply investigated documentary gains a unique before and after perspective, and includes interviews with: Nuclear Regulatory Commission inspectors, community advocates, investigative journalists, renowned physicists, nuclear engineers, and former government leaders.

As the nation stands at the crossroads of the Nuclear Renaissance, The Atomic States of America seeks to inspire an honest dialog about whether or not man can responsibly split the atom.

Followed by a panel discussion with Paul Gallay, President of Riverkeeper, author Gwyneth Cravens, and author Kelly McMasters. Moderated by Jim Saiers of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Professor of Hydrology; Associate Dean of Academic Affairs; Professor of Chemical Engineering.

Preceded By: 663114

6 min. I am a 66-year cicada. There was a big earthquake. There was a big tsunami. There also was a big accident.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 92 min.

Directors: Don Argott & Sheena M. Joyce
Producer: Sheena M. Joyce
Executive Producers: Joan Hornig & George Hornig, Noah Musher & Anne Marie,  Macari, Jane Preiser, Linda Gelfond, Rory Riggs, Danny Sherman
Associate Producer: Jane Preiser
Editor: Demian Fenton
Cinematographer: Don Argott


Bananas!*


EFFY Favorite

Friday, April 13th, 4:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Join us for a special showing of BANANAS!* (from EFFY 2010), the film at the center of this year's BIG BOYS GONE BANANAS!*. This is the documentary that made Dole so upset in the first place.

Juan “Accidentes” Dominguez is on his biggest case ever. On behalf of twelve Nicaraguan banana workers he tackles the Dole Food Company in a ground-breaking legal battle for their use of a banned pesticide that was known to cause sterility. Can he beat the giant, or will the corporation get away with it? In BANANAS!*, filmmaker Fredrik Gertten sheds new light on the global politics of food.

One third of the production price of the average banana is used simply to cover the cost of pesticides. All over the world, banana plantation workers are suffering and dying from the effects of these pesticides. Juan Dominguez, a million-dollar personal injury lawyer in Los Angeles, is on his biggest case ever representing over 10,000 Nicaraguan banana workers claiming to be afflicted by a pesticide known as Nemagon. Dole Food and Dow Chemicals are on trial.

Another banana worker is being buried in a small northern town in Nicaragua. For his whole life, Alberto Rosales used his machete to remove weeds from below the banana plants. His son says his last years were filled with pain, a body that was itching all night — and in the end his kidneys stopped working.

About the Filmmaker

Fredrik Gertten will be present for the screening of BIG BOYS GONE BANANAS!* to host a discussion after the film on Thursday, April 12th at 7pm at the Whitney Humanities Center.

Fredrik Gertten is an award winning director and journalist based in Malmö, Sweden. In 1994 he founded the production company WG Film. Before he worked as a foreign correspondent and columnist for radio, TV and press in Africa, Latin America, Asia and around Europe. Today he combines film making with a role as a creative producer on WG Film – famous for local stories with a global understanding, with several films catching the identity and transformation of his hometown. Featuring international stars like footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic in True Blue - The Way Back and architect Santiago Calatrava in The Socalist, the Architect and the Twisted Tower, among others. Dole Food company made his film BANANAS!* controversial by suing the company, producer and director. The fight for the film and freedom of speech won international recognition. In Sweden awarded with several prices including the Anna Politkovskaya freedom of speech award.

Watch the Trailer:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2009
Running Time: 80 Min.

Website: www.bananasthemovie.com

Director: Fredrik Gertten
Producers: Margarete Jangård, Bart Simpson
Editors: Jesper Osmund
Cinematography: Frank Pineda
Narrative Consultant: Niels Pagh Andersen


Big Boys Gone Bananas!*


East Coast Premiere

Thursday, April 12th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

What is a big corporation capable of in order to protect its brand? Swedish filmmaker Fredrik Gertten's experienced this recently. This is the riveting follow up film to BANANAS!*, which screened at EFFY 2010 and recounts the lawsuit that 12 Nicaraguan plantation workers brought against the fruit giant Dole Food Company. 

BANANAS!* was mysteriously pulled from competition at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Then a scathing article appeared in the Los Angeles Business Journal about the film, and Gertten subsequently receives a letter from Dole's attorney threatening him with legal action.

What follows is an unparalleled thriller that has Gertten capturing the entire process - from Dole attacking the producers with a defamation lawsuit, bullying scaretactics, to media-control and PR-spin. This personal film reveals precisely how a multinational will stop at nothing to get its way - freedom of speech is at stake. As Dole's PR company puts it, "It is easier to cope with a bad conscience than a bad reputation".

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Fredrik Gertten, and attorney Dan Klau. Moderated by Roger Cohn, Editor of Yale Environment 360.

About the Filmmaker

Fredrik Gertten is an award winning director and journalist based in Malmö, Sweden. In 1994 he founded the production company WG Film. Before he worked as a foreign correspondent and columnist for radio, TV and press in Africa, Latin America, Asia and around Europe. Today he combines film making with a role as a creative producer on WG Film – famous for local stories with a global understanding, with several films catching the identity and transformation of his hometown. Featuring international stars like footballer Zlatan Ibrahimovic in True Blue - The Way Back and architect Santiago Calatrava in The Socalist, the Architect and the Twisted Tower, among others. Dole Food company made his film BANANAS!* controversial by suing the company, producer and director. The fight for the film and freedom of speech won international recognition. In Sweden awarded with several prices including the Anna Politkovskaya freedom of speech award.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 90 Min.

Website: www.bigboysgonebananas.com

Director: Fredrik Gertten
Producer: Margarete Jangård
Editors: Jesper Osmund and Benjamin Binderup
Narrative Consultant: Niels Pagh Andersen


The Last Mountain


Wednesday, April 11th, 7:30pm
Kroon Hall, Burke Auditorium, 195 Prospect St

In the valleys of Appalachia, a battle is being fought over a mountain. It is a battle with severe consequences that affect every American, regardless of their social status, economic background or where they live. It is a battle that has taken many lives and continues to do so the longer it is waged. It is a battle over protecting our health and environment from the destructive power of Big Coal. 

The mining and burning of coal is at the epicenter of America’s struggle to balance its energy needs with environmental concerns. Nowhere is that concern greater than in Coal River Valley, West Virginia, where a small but passionate group of ordinary citizens are trying to stop Big Coal corporations, like Massey Energy, from continuing the devastating practice of Mountain Top Removal.

A passionate and personal tale that honors the extraordinary power of ordinary Americans who fight for what they believe in, The Last Mountain shines a light on America’s energy needs and how those needs are being supplied. It is a fight for our future that affects us all.

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Bill Haney, Maria Gunnoe of OVEC, and Kristin Tracz of MACED. Moderated by Laura Bozzi, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Update: Unforuntately, Bill Haney can no longer join us.

Take Action: visit http://ilovemountains.org

About the Filmmaker

Bill Haney has written, produced and directed award winning documentary and narrative features for ten years. He is co-founder of Uncommon Productions. His most recent feature documentary, The Price of Sugar, which he wrote, produced and directed, was short-listed for an Academy Award, nominated for the NAACP’s Image Award and was the recipient of numerous other honors, including the Gabriel Award and the Audience Award at South by Southwest. The documentary A Life Among Whales, which he directed and produced, takes a look at one man’s lifelong passion for the wild and won numerous awards including a Silver Hugo and the Earthwatch Film Award.

In addition to filmmaking, Haney is founder of the eco-housing startup Blu Homes, using advanced technology to make housing greener, healthier and more affordable.  He is also chairman of World Connect, a non-profit supporting programs to help women and children in 400 developing world villages.

Preceded By: Chasing Water

20 min. In Chasing Water, photojournalist Peter McBride sets out to document the flow of the Colorado River from source to sea.

Watch the Trailer for The Last Mountain:
 


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 85 Min.

Website: thelastmountainmovie.com

Director: Bill Haney
Writers: Bill Haney, Peter Rhodes
Producers: Clara Bingham, Eric Grunebaum, Bill Haney
Co-Producer: Laura Longsworth
Executive Producers: Tim Disney, Sarah Johnson Redlich, Tim Rockwood
Cinematographers: Jerry Risius, Stephen McCarthy, Tim Hotchner
Editor: Peter Rhodes


Colin Beavan, ‘No Impact Man’


Special Event

Wednesday, April 11th, 6:00pm
Kroon Hall, Room 321, 195 Prospect St

Join Colin Beavan, the "No Impact Man," for a live conversation about climate change, consumption, advocacy, and how to take steps that will lead to environmental change. Colin conceived the No Impact Project following the success of his blog, book, and film, which chronicle his family’s year-long experiment living a zero-waste lifestyle in New York City. Central to his thesis is the notion that deep-seated individual behavior change leads to both cultural change and political engagement. Living low-impact provides a clear entry point into the environmental movement.

About Colin

Colin is a former communications consultant for nonprofits turned book writer, blogger, and activist. In 2006, his No Impact Man experiment exploded in the media after being featured in the New York Times, and he has since come to be considered one of the spokespeople for the environmental movement. He writes and administers the provocative environmental blog noimpactman.typepad.com, which has become a meeting point for discussion of environmental issues from a “deep green” perspective. He is an advisor to NYU’s Sustainability Task Force, board member of Transportation Alternatives and advisor to Just Food. He was named one of MSN’s Ten Most Influential Men of 2007, one of Elle Magazine’s 2008 Eco-Illuminators, and his blog was named one of the world’s top 15 environmental websites by Time Magazine.

Visit noimpactproject.org for more on Colin and the No Impact Project.


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Filmmaking Workshop with Andrew Grace


Special Event

Wednesday, April 11th, 12:00pm
Kroon Hall, Room 321, 195 Prospect St

Join award-winning Eating Alabama filmmaker Andrew Beck Grace as he shares film clips, stories from the field, and practical advice on making films. Topics covered include tips for funding, shooting, and finishing an independent documentary, and more broadly, the role of documentary storytelling in environmental advocacy and education. Don't miss: Andrew will also be present at the screening of his film Eating Alabama on Tuesday April 10th.

Free and open to the public. RSVP required at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

About Andrew Grace

Andrew Beck Grace was born and raised in north Alabama. He is an independent documentary filmmaker whose films have aired on Public Television stations and at film festivals across the country. He received an MA in American Studies from the University of Wyoming where he made his first documentary feature about the reenactments of Custer’s Last Stand in southern Montana. After a few years in the West, making films, freelancing for magazines and working as a producer for NPR News, he moved back to his home state to tell stories about the Deep South. At The University of Alabama he teaches and oversees a unique interdisciplinary social justice documentary program called Documenting Justice, and was recently named by The Oxford American one of the “Most Creative Teachers in the South.” In 2009 he was invited to attend the CPB/PBS Producers Academy at WGBH. He's also a writer whose nonfiction has been nominated for a Puschcart Prize.


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Eating Alabama


East Coast Premiere

Tuesday, April 10th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

In search of a simpler life, a young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat the way their grandparents did – locally and seasonally. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories. A thoughtful and often funny essay on community, the South and sustainability, Eating Alabama is a story about why food matters.

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Andrew Grace, Monique Stefani of the New Haven Food Policy Council, and Cara Donovan of CitySeed. Moderated by Jeremy Oldfield of the Yale Sustainable Food Project.

Don't miss: Andrew will be hosting a special filmmaking workshop on Wednesday April 11th. For details, click here.

About the Filmmaker

Andrew Beck Grace is a documentary filmmaker and native Alabamian. He's a past fellow at the CPB/PBS Producers Academy and directs the Documenting Justice program at the University of Alabama.

Preceded By: High & Dry

20 min. Around 75% of global cotton production takes place in developing countries. Extensive environmental and human rights abuses occur during production, including the excessive and unsustainable use of pesticides and freshwater.

Watch the Trailer for Eating Alabama:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2012
Running Time: 61 Minutes

Website: www.eatingalabama.com

Director: Andrew Beck Grace


Surviving Progress


New England Premiere

Monday, April 9th, 7:00pm
Yale Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel Street - Entrance on High Street

Technological advancement, economic development, population increase - are they signs of a thriving society? Or too much of a good thing?

Based on Ronald Wright's best-seller A Short History of Progress, this intelligent, provocative documentary by Mathieu Roy and Harold Crooks explores the concept of progress in our modern world, guiding us through a sweeping but detailed survey of the major "progress traps" facing our civilization in the arenas of technology, economics, consumption, and the environment.

Featuring powerful arguments from such visionaries as Jane Goodall, Margaret Atwood, Stephen Hawking, Craig Venter, Robert Wright, Marina Silva, Michael Hudson, and Ronald Wright himself, this enlightening and visually spectacular film invites us to contemplate the progress traps that destroyed past civilizations and that lie treacherously embedded in our own.

Providing an honest look at the risks and pitfalls of running 21st Century "software" (our accumulated knowledge) on 50,000-year-old "hardware" (our primate brains), Surviving Progress offers a challenge: to prove making apes smarter was not an evolutionary dead end.

Followed by a discussion with filmmaker Harold Crooks and Mary Evelyn Tucker, Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale.

About the Filmmakers

Mathieu Roy is a Montreal-based filmmaker whose career path has steered him into the worlds of cinema, theatre, opera, TV and classical music. His first feature documentary, François Girard en Trois Actes, was awarded the 2005 prix Gémeau for best cultural documentary. In April 2009, at the opening of the 27th International Festival of Films on Art (FIFA), Mathieu presented Mort à Venise, a musical journey with Louis Lortie. The film won the Prix du public ARTV. Mathieu's current film projects include his first fiction feature, a family drama and a multimedia project about Martin Scorsese's World Cinema Foundation.

Harold Crooks is an author and writer/producer whose award-winning and acclaimed documentary film credits include: The Corporation; Karsh Is History; Pax Americana And The Weaponization of Space; The World Is Watching; Bhopal: The Search for Justice; and the TV series Black Coffee. He is a recipient of a Genie Award of the Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television; a Gold Hugo at the Chicago International Film Festival; a Leo Award for Best Screenwriter (Documentary) of the Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Foundation of B.C.; a National Documentary Film Award (Best Writing Category) at 1996 Hot Docs!; a Writers Guild of Canada Top Ten Awards finalist; a Commonwealth Fellowship, India; and a Fund for Investigative Journalism (Washington, DC) travel grant.

Preceded By: Meet Mr. Toilet

3 min. For those without access to a simple toilet, poop can be poison. Businessman-turned-sanitation-superhero Jack Sim fights this oft-neglected crisis affecting 2.6 billion people.

Watch a Trailer of Surviving Progress:


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 86 Min.

Website: survivingprogress.com

Director: Mathieu Roy
Co-Director: Harold Crooks
Producers: Daniel Louis, Denis Robert
Written by: Harold Crooks & Mathieu Roy
Executive Producers: Mark Achbar & Betsy Carson (Big Picture Media Corporation), Silva Basmajian (NFB), Martin Scorsese, Emma Tillinger Koskoff
Producer: Gerry Flahive (NFB)
Editor: Louis-Martin Paradis


2012 Jury


The 2012 EFFY Jury is made of Yale faculty, staff, alumni, Master's students, and Yale College students. They will decide which films take home the Best Feature and Best Short awards.

 

Caitlin Cromwell

Yale College Student

Caitlin is in her sophomore year as a Yale undergraduate. She was raised in Baltimore, Maryland, alongside two siblings, four dogs, two cats, a whole host of chickens, and a swarm of honeybees. An English major, Caitlin reads a lot of Wordsworth, and agrees with him when he says that "great Nature...exists in works of mighty Poets."

 

Jared Gilbert

Yale Divinity School, Master's Student

Jared Gilbert is a Master of Divinity candidate (2012) at Yale Divinity School (YDS), where he is the current student body president. He is preparing for urban ministry in Brooklyn as a pastor with the United Church of Christ. Advocacy for environmental causes has been a part of his professional, personal and academic life, as Communications Manager for a green architecture firm, advocacy against environmental racism, and exploration of ecological ethics and environmental theologies through study at YDS.



Ronald Gregg

Film Studies Program, Senior Lecturer and Programming Director

Ron Gregg is Director of Film Programming at the Whitney Humanities Center and Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, American Studies, and LGBT Studies at Yale. Before coming to Yale, he taught at Northwestern, Duke, the University of Chicago, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Gregg is a film curator, who has programmed special events for film festivals in Chicago, San Francisco, Johannesburg, London, and elsewhere, and in a past life, he was a digital video artist, producing work that was screened in the US and Europe.

 

Vanessa Lamers

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies / School of Public Health, Master's Student

Vanessa Lamers is currently pursuing a Joint Master of Public Health and Master of Forestry & Environmental Studies degree at Yale. Her current research involves studying the environmental and human health impacts of shale gas development, a portion of which is an analysis of if environmental documentaries such as "Gasland" portray scientific arguments properly. She works at the Yale Art Gallery, where she engages people of all ages (3-99) with imagery and the arts. She also serves on the board of the New Haven Land Trust, and is the Community Outreach Chair for the non-profit Slow Food Shoreline. Vanessa grew up in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, where she developed her love for all things environmental.

 

Will Minter

Graduate and Student Professional School, Master's Student

Will is a master's student from the UK studying East Asian studies, with a focus on Ancient Chinese literature. He loves nature, and enjoys identifying plants and birds. Before coming to Yale he was a teacher for three years, and became interested in how to reduce waste in schools and how to avoid hypocrisy when teaching about the environment.

 

Barry Muchnick

Quinnipiac University, Professor; School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Alum

Barry Muchnick is an environmental historian whose research and teaching revolve around the idea that history looks very different when considered in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together. Currently teaching at Quinnipiac University, Barry recently completed his dissertation, “Nature’s Republic: Fresh Air Reform and The Moral Ecology of Citizenship in Turn of the Century America” in a joint Ph.D. program of his own design between Yale’s History Department and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He has lectured widely on British landscape painting and environmental ethics; environmental citizenship; the interconnections of science, technology, and sentiment; nature and national identity; and natural disaster.

 

Annie O’Sullivan

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master's Student

Annie O'Sullivan is working towards her master's degree in Environmental Management at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES). She graduated from Williams College in 2007, where she studied biology with a focus on evolutionary ecology. Annie is most interested in environmental education at the high school level. Prior to attending F&ES, she worked for Lava Lake Lamb, a sheep ranch with a focus on conservation in Central Idaho.

 

Scott Rumage

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, IT Support Technician

Scott Rumage became fixated with films when his grandmother took him to see Gigi in 1982. After getting fed up with his parents' small TV & horrible sound, he re-wired their house for a laserdisc player and surround sound in 1989. His large collection of laserdiscs, VHS tapes, DVDs, HD-DVDs, & Blurays (he totally skipped betamax) is arranged by his librarian husband, Allen Townsend, in Library of Congress Format, and is managed by their miniature piebald daschund, Dashelle.

 

Rachael Styer

Yale College Student

Rachael Styer is a senior Environmental Studies major at Yale College with a concentration in environmental history and policy. She has focused her research on agricultural policy history, specifically in Lancaster County, PA, and hopes to one day have a positive impact on farmland preservation and agricultural laws. In her free time she enjoys LA Times crossword puzzles, watching entire series of TV comedies and spending time with her friends and family.

 

Tara Varghese

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master's Student

Tara Varghese is in her second year at F&ES, studying water quality and resource management. She grew up in Southeast Asia and has gained a broad perspective on natural resource issues ranging from the harsh realities faced by some communities to the hope and promise experienced by others. She received degrees in Biology and English from Case Western Reserve University, and prior to arriving at Yale she worked at an environmental consulting firm in the Boston area and an NGO in Ladakh, India.


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Enjoy Your Meal!


Special Pre-Festival Screening
in partnership with the Peabody

Wednesday, April 4th, 7:00pm
Peabody Museum of Natural History Auditorium, 170 Whitney Ave

Please join us for this special pre-festival screening in partnership with the Peabody Museum of Natural History in the lead up to the Environmental Film Festival at Yale, which runs April 9th - April 15th.

Enjoy Your Meal! follows the origin of a meal prepared by renowned chefs. The film traces not only where the ingredients are coming from, but stresses also the impact on local life. Soy beans, the main food for pigs, grow mostly in Brazil on huge tracts of land, right next to an Indian tribe. As a result, their natural habitat changes drastically. Prawns from the Philippines are cultivated by a former banker, seeing his dreams come true, but at the cost of the local fishermen. Sugar snaps in Kenya are massively exported to Europe. A visit to the land where they are grown shows the reality and how it brings people to desperate actions.

Yet, people work hard and try to make a living, mostly without even realizing the long-term impact of this industry to the people and the environment. The food on our plate tells a bigger story than we initially know. A creative documentary about how food changes the world. Enjoy your meal!

Moderated discussion to follow the screening.

About the Filmmaker

Walther Grotenhuis graduated in 1978 at the Dutch Film Academy and has been active in the documentary world from the beginning. In the 80’s, he continuously directed, produced and wrote documentaries for Dutch television channels and governmental organisations, all with a political, social and environmental background. In 1993 he was producer/director of A Truth With Many Faces (NCRV). The film won a Dutch Award for best scenario, was nominated for the ‘Gouden Kalf’ and was awarded as Best Dutch TV documentary of the year. He was also director/producer of Aids: A Woman’s Story (AVRO) which received a Golden Rose nomination (Montreux, Luzern) in 2005. With Enjoy your Meal!, he has written and directed his first independent documentary.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 89 Min.

Website: www.smakelijketendefilm.com

Director: Walther Grotenhuis


Speakers


Musicwood

Monday, April 8th, 6:30pm
Yale Art Gallery Auditorium, 1111 Chapel St. (entrance on High St.)

Nick Colesanti

VP Corporate Operations, Martin Guitar

Nick Colesanti is Vice-President of Corporate Operations for Martin Guitar. Nick represented Martin in the Musicwood Coalition by supporting efforts to protect and sustain the natural resources of the Tongass National Rain Forest in Southeast Alaska.

Kathryn Dudley

Yale University- Moderator

Kathryn Marie Dudley is a professor of Anthropology and American Studies at Yale University. Her research focuses on changing cultures of work in the contemporary United States. She is the author of The End of the Line: Lost Jobs, New Lives in Postindustrial America, and Debt and Dispossession: Farm Loss in America's Heartland. She has just completed a book on acoustic guitar makers in North America, which will be published in 2014.

Maxine Trump 

Filmmaker, Musicwood

Maxine Trump worked for the BBC in London for seven years as a development executive for scripted comedy. This is the first feature documentary Maxine has directed. She has directed a long running series of interstitual social issue documentaries for the TV network TNT in the USA. She has also directed a series of fifteen short interstitials for the network Sundance Channel. Her short film "Silent Life" was nominated at the IFC/ARPA Hollywood film festival. She also made a ten-minute documentary for the MSC campaign expedition to the Bering Sea, Alaska, and a seven-minute documentary for the New York City Greenmarket organization and a short documentary for the FSC. She has won BDA awards for her work in television in the USA, for National Geographic, PBS, BBC America, Animal Planet, etc. She is a freelance director having worked on numerous commercial projects for network TV living in Brooklyn, NY.

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GMO OMG

Tuesday, April 9th, 7:00pm
Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street

Justin Freiberg 

Co-founder, Encendia Biochar and Yale Sustainable Food Project - Moderator

Justin Freiberg aims to align entrepreneurial action with the movement to produce good, fair food. Justin works with the Yale Sustainable Food Project, helping to create opportunities for Yalies to connect their studies to the world of food and agriculture. He is also a co-founder of Encendia Biochar, where he serves as Chief Marketing Officer, working with farmers, landscapers, and turf managers to build biochar products that meet their needs. Past work for Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, the Wildlife Conservation Society, Added Value, and his founding of the Urban Foodshed Collaborative trained him in connecting consumers to environmental causes through market-based solutions. He holds a MESc from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and an MA in Social Psychology from Wesleyan University. He is the 2010 recipient of the Graduate Elm-Ivy Award from Yale University and the City of New Haven.

Tara Cook-Littman

GMO Free CT

Tara Cook-Littman is a Certified Holistic Health Counselor and a former New York City Prosecutor. She is combining her advocacy skills as an attorney with her passion for health and wellness and advocating for improved food policy within the United States. Tara is leading GMO Free CT, a grass roots organization dedicated to educating consumers about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and getting legislation passed in the state of Connecticut that would mandate the labeling of products containing GMOs. Tara teaches seminars on various topics related to health, including the dangers of GMOs and how to avoid them in the marketplace .

Jeremy Seifert 

Filmmaker, GMO OMG

In 2010, Jeremy completed his debut film, DIVE!, Living Off America’s Waste. Initially made with a $200 budget, a borrowed camera, and a lot of heart, DIVE! went on to win 22 film festivals worldwide. In 2010 with the release of DIVE!, Jeremy began the production company, Compeller Pictures. He is now a filmmaker and activist, traveling the country and speaking on humanitarian and environmental issues. Jeremy’s second film, GMO OMG, tells the hidden story of the take over of our food supply by giant chemical companies, an agricultural crisis that has grown into a cultural crisis. He has once again found the heart of the project in his own journey and awakening. Jeremy and his wife, Jen, live in North Carolina with their three children, Finn (7), Scout (4), and Pearl (2).

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Fruit Hunters

Wednesday, April 10th, 7:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Jonah Meadows Adels

Yale University - Moderator 

Jonah Meadows Adels is a farmer, filmmaker, and environmental educator. His research at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies focuses on the carbon sequestration potential of Chestnut and Hazelnut agro-forestry systems. Before coming to Yale, he served as Education Director and Perennials Manager at Jewish Farm School, where he designed, planted, and tended a diverse and abundant 1.5 acre orchard where dozens of varieties of fruit coexisted with bees, chickens, mushrooms, and humans. He enjoys swimming, singing, and planting trees.

Mark Ashton

Morris K. Jesup Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology and Director of School Forests Professor

Ashton conducts research on the biological and physical processes governing the regeneration of natural forests and on the creation of their agroforestry analogs. In particular, he seeks a better understanding of regeneration establishment among assemblages of closely related trees. His long-term research concentrates on tropical and temperate forests of the Asian and American realms. His field sites within these regions were selected specifically to allow comparison of growth, adaptation, and plasticity within and among close assemblages of species that have evolved within forest climates with differing degrees of seasonality. Findings from these studies have theoretical implications for understanding the maintenance of diversity of tree species in forested ecosystems and the adaptability of forests to change in climate. The results of his research have been applied to the development and testing of silvicultural techniques for restoration of degraded lands and for the management of natural forests for a variety of timber and nontimber products. Field sites include tropical forests in Sri Lanka and Panama, temperate forests in India and New England, and boreal forests in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Noris Ledesma

Curator of Tropical Fruit, Fairchild Botanic Garden

Noris is the Curator of Tropical Fruit at the Tropical Fruit Program at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden. She is a plant collector with experience in the Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Honduras, Thailand, Philippines, South Africa, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Colombia, Brazil, and India. Her foci are mango (main), Avocado, Jackfruit, mamey sapote, canistel, sapodilla, caimito, and Spanish lime. She has also taught classes on horticulture. Noris is one of the subjects of the film, The Fruit Hunters.

Peter Rothenberg

Owner, Northfordy Farm

Northfordy Farm has been growing vegetables, herbs, flowers, and unusual fruit sustainably since 1975. We also produce maple syrup, free-range eggs, yarn, lamb and chevon (goat). We sell at two farmers markets and we have a small CSA, and we do all of this on 4 acres. We are Certified Naturally Grown. Peter Rothenberg, owner, is past president of CT NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Assoc.). He is a semi-retired psychologist/psychotherapist and spends most of his time growing things. His current project is Nutrient-Dense Crop Production.

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A River Changes Course

Thursday, April 11th, 7:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Roger Cohn

Editor, Yale e360- Moderator

Roger Cohn is the editor of Yale Environment 360, an award-winning online magazine focusing on global environmental issues that is published at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Launched in 2008, Yale Environment 360 has emerged as a leading international source of reporting, analysis, opinion, and discussion on the environment, with more than 2.5 million visitors in the last year in 219 countries and territories. Cohn developed this pioneering Web publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and it has received widespread recognition and numerous honors, including a National Magazine Award for Digital Media and the Online Journalism Award for Best Specialty Site. Yale Environment 360 also co-produced and exclusively featured The Warriors of Qiugang, a video about a Chinese village’s battle against a polluting chemical plant that was nominated for a 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject) and showed at EFFY 2011. Cohn formerly served as editor-in-chief of Mother Jones and executive editor of Audubon, revitalizing both magazines. Prior to that, he was a staff writer with The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was among the first U.S. journalists to establish an environmental beat. His writing on the environment and other issues has appeared in various publications, including The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, and Outside. A graduate of Yale College, he has been an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellow and has served as a visiting professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and lectured at various universities, including Columbia, Stanford, and New York University.

Kaylanee Mam

Filmmaker, A River Changes Course

Having escaped war-torn Cambodia in 1979, lawyer-turned-filmmaker Kalyanee Mam (Yale College '99) seeks to combine human rights and law in creating documentaries that are both captivating and inspiring. Mam’s past work includes the 2011 Academy Award-winning documentary about the global financial crisis, Inside Job, where she served as cinematographer, associate producer, and researcher, and her first documentary short, "Between Earth & Sky." She directed, produced, and shot this film, which follows the hopes and struggles of three young Iraqi refugees.

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Elemental

Friday, April 12th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Sir Peter Crane- Moderator

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and Professor of Botany

Dean Crane is the Carl W. Knobloch Jr. Dean at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. He is known internationally for his work on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was Director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the Museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today comprise the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was Director of The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation and public programs. Professor Crane was elected to the Royal Society – the UK academy of sciences in 1998. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences, a Foreign Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a Member of the German Academy Leopoldina. He was knighted in the UK for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. Professor Crane currently serves on the Boards of the World Wildlife Fund-U.S., the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.

John Grim

Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

John Grim is currently a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University teaching courses that draw students from the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, and the Yale Colleges. He is Coordinator of the Forum on Religion and Ecology with Mary Evelyn Tucker, and series editor of “World Religions and Ecology,” from Harvard Divinity School’s Center for the Study of World Religions. In that series he edited Indigenous Traditions and Ecology: the Interbeing of Cosmology and Community (Harvard, 2001). He has been a Professor of Religion at Bucknell University, and at Sarah Lawrence College where he taught courses in Native American and Indigenous religions, World Religions, and Religion and Ecology. His published works include: The Shaman: Patterns of Religious Healing Among the Ojibway Indians (University of Oklahoma Press, 1983) and edited a volume with Mary Evelyn Tucker entitled Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994, 5th printing 2000), and a Daedalus volume (2001) entitled, “Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change?” John is also President of the American Teilhard Association.

Emmanuel Vaughan Lee

Filmmaker, Elemental and Yukon Kings

Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee is a director, producer, musician and composer. In 2005 he founded the Global Oneness Project, a webby award winning media platform and production-company. He has directed and produced numerous award winning short films–A Thousand Suns (2009), What Would it Look Like (2009), A Game for Life (2008), Barrio de Paz (2007), Seva Café (2007) that have been widely distributed online and aired on PBS, LINK TV, and ABC Australia among others. Prior to his work in film Emmanuel performed and recorded as a sideman with some of the biggest names in Jazz, as well as releasing two records under his own name, Previous Misconceptions (2002) and Borrowed Time (2005).

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Gold Fever

Saturday, April 13th, 7:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Molly Roske

Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Master's of Forest Science Candidate - Moderator

Molly is an ecologist who spent three years working with indigenous community groups in the highlands of Guatemala on issues of natural resources management and conservation, and private/public/communal land rights. She has formerly worked on similar issues in South Africa, Ecuador and Alaska, focusing on collaborative multiple-use conservation strategies for ecosystem integrity.

JT Haines 

Co-Director, Gold Fever

JT serves as producer, writer and director with Northland Films, a three-person documentary film collective based out of Minnesota and Iowa City. JT formerly practiced as a corporate attorney at Dorsey & Whitney in Minneapolis, and holds a law degree from the University of Virginia and a public policy degree from the University of Minnesota.

Grahame Russell

Co-Director of Rights Action 

Grahame is a non-practicing Canadian lawyer, author, adjunct professor at the University of Northern British Columbia and, since 1995, co-director of Rights Action.

Andrew Sherburne

Co-Director, Gold Fever

Andrew serves as producer, director and director of photography with Northland Films, a three-person documentary film collective based out of Minnesota and Iowa City. Andrew is co-founder of FilmScene, a non-profit cinema arts group in Iowa City, and the former publisher of Little Village Magazine. Andrew holds studio arts and computer science degrees from Grinnell College.

Helga Tzicap de Snow

Human Rights Lawyer

Helga Snow is a lawyer and law professor in Guatemala with a focus in democratization and human rights. Helga has worked in a variety of areas related to human rights and the defense of indigenous women. From 2009 to 2010, Helga worked as a fellow for the Organization of American States, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights in Washington D.C.. There she worked on cases involving indigenous rights and mining. Helga has also worked for the Guatemalan Women’s Defense Ministry; at the legal department at Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services (IRIS) in New Haven, CT, and as legal advisor at the Consulate of Guatemala in New York City. Helga currently works at Lawyers Without Borders in New Haven, where she researchers issues related to women’s rights and mediation in Africa and Latin America.

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The East

Sunday, April 14th, 10:00am
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Zal Batmanglij

Director / Screenwriter, The East

In 2012, Variety ranked Zal Batmanglij one of its “10 Directors to Watch” as a result of his directorial debut, Sound of My Voice, which screened at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. His follow-up feature, The East, stars longtime collaborator Brit Marling alongside Alexander Skarsgård and Ellen Page. Batmanglij grew up in Washington, D.C., and studied anthropology at Georgetown University. He was a directing fellow at the American Film Institute, where his peers elected him to speak at graduation.

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More than Honey

Sunday, April 14th, 12:30pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Eli Powell

Researcher, Yale University - Moderator

Eli Powell is a researcher in Dr. Nancy Moran's lab at Yale's West Campus. He has been studying the microbes that live in the digestive tract of bumble bees and honey bees for the past three years. Eli is currently getting Yale's hives ready for the thousands of flying freshman co-ed worker bees who will be arriving this spring.

Mark H. Creighton

Apiary Inspector of the State of CT

Mark H. Creighton works for the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven as an Agricultural Research Technician. He is assigned to the State Entomologist Office as Connecticut’s Apiary Inspector. These duties involve inspecting honey bee colonies for disease and assisting Connecticut Beekeepers in support of Connecticut’s multimillion dollar agricultural industry. Mark grew up in New Hampshire and started Beekeeping at a young age. He keeps bees in several locations in Connecticut and is the official Beekeeper for The Agricultural Experiment Station.

Benjamin Gardner 

Beekeeper and Co-onwer, Pollen

Benjamin created Pollen in 2009 to help businesses and individual create solutions for sustainable living by installing and managing all aspects of small scale food production and waste reduction. Pollen specializes in backyard and rooftop installations including vegetable gardens, chicken coops, bee hives, rainwater catchment systems, greenhouses, compost systems, living roofs, and more. Benjamin is an avid supporter of sustainable practices, having served as Chair of the New Haven Land Trust's Community Garden Committee, as well as being a current Board Member at Common Ground High School. He enjoys fermenting things, like pickles and beer.

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The Last Ocean

Sunday, April 14th, 3:00pm
Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street

Mary Beth Decker

Associate Research Scientist, Yale University -  Moderator

Mary Beth Decker is an Associate Research Scientist the the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department at Yale. She interested in how oceanographic processes and conditions affect the distribution, abundance and behavior of marine predators and their prey and how these processes affect trophic structure of coastal ecosystems. She uses a multi-scale, interdisciplinary approach to investigate these processes, by employing shipboard expeditions, laboratory experiments, modeling, and retrospective examinations of long-term data sets.

Thomas Near

Associate Professor, Yale University

Thomas Near is an Associate Professor in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at Yale. His current research is focused on several lineages of North American freshwater fishes, as well as a clade of fishes endemic to the waters surrounding Antarctica.

Lauri Kealoha Friedenburg, Research Scientist, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and Adjunct Professor, Quinnipiac University

Kealoha Freidenburg

Lecturer and Research Scientist, Yale University

Kealoha Freidenburg is a Lecturer and Research Scientist at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Following her undergraduate degree in biology at Pomona College, she worked in Cook, Washington for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on salmon migration. The agency sponsored her Masters degree in Fisheries at the University of Washington. She then completed her Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut. Since coming to Yale in 2003 , Freidenburg has taught courses including fish biology, conservation biology, introductory biology and field science: environment and sustainability. Her research focuses on the conservation and ecology of aquatic species.

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Trashed

Sunday, April 14th, 6:00pm
Sheffield-Sterling-Strathcona Hall (SSS), 1 Prospect Street

Mike Biddle

MBA Polymers

Throwing water bottles into the recycling bin doesn’t begin to address the massive quantity of postconsumer plastic that ends up in landfills and the ocean. Because it’s so difficult to separate the various kinds of plastics – up to 20 kinds per product – that make up our computers, cell phones, cars and home appliances, only a small fraction of plastics from complex waste streams are recycled, while the rest is tossed. In 1992, Mike Biddle, a plastics engineer, set out to find a solution. He set up a lab in his garage in Pittsburg, California, and began experimenting with complex-plastics recycling, borrowing ideas from such industries as mining and grain processing. Since then, Biddle has developed a patented 30-step plastics recycling system that includes magnetically extracting metals, shredding the plastics, sorting them by polymer type and producing graded pellets to be reused in industry – a process that takes less than a tenth of the energy required to make virgin plastic from crude oil. Today, the company he cofounded, MBA Polymers, has plants in China and Austria, and plans to build more in Europe, where electronics-waste regulation (which doesn’t yet have an equivalent in the US) already ensures a stream of materials to exploit – a process Biddle calls “above-ground mining.” Mike is featured in the movie Trashed.

Marian Chertow 

Associate Professor of Industrial Environmental Management, Director of the Program on Solid Waste Policy, and Director of the Industrial Environmental Management Program

Marian Chertow is the Associate Professor of Industrial Environmental Management and has been Director of the Industrial Environmental Management Program at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies since 1991. Her research and teaching focus on industrial ecology, business/environment issues, waste management, and environmental technology innovation. Primary research interests are 1) The study of industrial symbiosis including geographically-based exchanges of wastes, materials, energy, and water within networks of businesses. 2) The potential of industrial ecology to underpin ideas of the proposed Circular Economy law in China. 3) The application of innovation theory to the development of environmental and energy technology. Prior to Yale, Marian spent ten years in environmental business and state and local government including service as President of the Connecticut Resources Recovery Authority charged with developing a billion dollar waste infrastructure system for the state. She is a frequent international lecturer and has testified on waste, recycling and other environmental issues before committees of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. Marian is on the Editorial Board of BioCycle Magazine and the Journal of Industrial Ecology, the Board of the Eco-Industrial Development Council, as well as on the Advisory Board of the Connecticut Clean Energy Fund, which is developing renewable energy projects to increase the availability of green energy. Marian serves on the founding faculty of the Masters of Science in Environmental Management Program at the National University of Singapore where she teaches “Business and Environment” and is a Visiting Professor at Nankai University and National Center for Innovation Research on Circular Economy in China.

CJ May

Recycling Expert, New Haven, CT

After graduating from Yale Forestry and Environmental Studies with a Masters of Environmental Management, CJ May worked as Yale's recycling coordinator for more than 20 years. During that time he planned, implemented and coordinated Yale's sustainable materials management efforts in compliance with state and local laws as well as Yale's rapidly developing sustainability goals. CJ has also served as the president of the Connecticut Recyclers Coalition and remains an active member of its board. Combining his love for magic with his love for the environment, CJ presents and performs sustainability-focused magic. For adult audiences, CJ's Resourcery takes the form of TED Talk style presentations or professional development and training. When performing for children he assumes the role of "Cyril the Sorcerer" as he uses magic to share important messages on recycling, water, energy and other issues.

John Wargo

Tweedy Ordway Professor of Environmental Health and Politics

John Wargo is a Professor of Risk Analysis, Environmental Policy, and Political Science, and Chair of the Yale College Environmental Studies Major and Program. He has just written Green Intelligence Creating Environments that Protect Human Health published by Yale Press. The book won the Independent Publishers Award of Gold Medal in the field of “environment, ecology, and nature” for 2010. It also won the 2010 Connecticut Book Award in non-fiction. It was chosen as one of Scientific American’s favorite books for 2009. Professor Wargo also wrote Our Children’s Toxic Legacy: How Science and Law Fail to Protect Us from Pesticides, published by Yale University Press in 1998, presenting a history of law and science governing pesticides with special attention to the vulnerability of infants and children. The book won the American Association of Publishers award as the Best Scholarly & Professional Book in Government and Political Science in 1998. He is also co-author of Ecosystems: Science and Management published by Springer-Verlag in 1998. Wargo participated in several National Academy of Sciences committees, analyzing children’s exposure to toxic substances. He also has testified before both Senate and House Committees, and been an advisor to the White House, the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture organization, the EPA, USDA, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on environmental threats to children’s health. He has participated in the design of federal and state laws and regulations intended to reduce human exposures to air pollution, pesticides, plastics, mercury, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.


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Speakers 2011



Ian Cheney

Discussing the film The City Dark on Wednesday, March 30, 7:00pm

Ian Cheney grew up in New England and received Bachelor's and Master's degrees from The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He co-created and starred in the feature documentary KING CORN, and directed the feature documentary THE GREENING OF SOUTHIE. Most recently, Ian directed and produced a feature documentary about light pollution entitled THE CITY DARK, and a short film on urban agriculture entitled TRUCK FARM. With longtime collaborator Curt Ellis, Ian runs Wicked Delicate, a documentary and advocacy project in Brooklyn, NY. Wicked Delicate maintains a 1/1000th acre farm in the back of a 1986 Dodge pickup truck, and is part of a planning process to develop FoodCorps, a national school garden and Farm to School program.

 

Sir Peter Crane

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. Dean of the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and Professor of Botany.
Discussing the film Queen of the Sun on Sunday, April 3, 6:00pm

Dean Crane’s work focuses on the diversity of plant life: its origin and fossil history, current status, and conservation and use. From 1992 to 1999 he was director of the Field Museum in Chicago with overall responsibility for the museum’s scientific programs. During this time he established the Office of Environmental and Conservation Programs and the Center for Cultural Understanding and Change, which today make up the Division of Environment, Culture, and Conservation (ECCo). From 1999 to 2006 he was director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, one of the largest and most influential botanical gardens in the world. His tenure at Kew saw strengthening and expansion of the gardens’ scientific, conservation, and public programs. Dean Crane was elected to the Royal Society (the U.K. academy of sciences) in 1998. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, foreign associate of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and a member of the German Academy Leopoldina. He was knighted in the U.K. for services to horticulture and conservation in 2004. Dean Crane currently serves on the Board of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Chicago Botanic Garden, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas, and the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation.

 

Bob Crelin

Discussing the film The City Dark on Wednesday, March 30, 7:00pm

Author and inventor Bob Crelin has shapedlight pollution legislation in Connecticut at the state and local level. Bob is the co-founder of Lighting by Branford, which manufactures the GlareBuster—an an award-winning "dark sky" floodlight. He has also written two children's books, "There Once Was a Sky Full of Stars," and “Faces of the Moon,” in an effort to educate the next generation about the beauty of the night sky.In 2004, Bob was honored with the Astronomical League’s Walter Scott Houston Award for his years of devotion to working to preserve the night sky for our children.

 

Sam Cullman

Discussing the film If A Tree Falls on Thursday, March 31, 7:00pm

Sam Cullman is currently producing and shooting a documentary about the War on Drugs in America, directed by Eugene Jarecki, and is starting post-production on BLACK CHEROKEE, a short he co-directed with Benjamin Rosen about a self-taught New York City street artist. Cullman's camera credits have included Eugene Jarecki's WHY WE FIGHT (2005), which won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize in documentary; director Rob Van Alkemade and producer Morgan Spurlock's WHAT WOULD JESUS BUY? (2007); directors David Redmon and Ashley Sabin's KAMP KATRINA (2007); Jonathan Stack's LOCKUP: INSIDE ANGOLA (2008) and THE FARM: 10 DOWN (2009), both follow-ups to Stacks' THE FARM: ANGOLA, USA (1998). His cinematography on KING CORN (2006), a Peabody award-winning documentary for ITVS, was noted for its "handsome lensing" by Dennis Harvey (Variety) and was dubbed "visually arresting" by Ann Hornaday (The Washington Post). Cullman has also produced and directed a number of short films in collaboration with non-profits and governmental agencies like the New York City Housing Authority and the Ford Foundation. His 2008 doc for the National Center for Children Exposed to Violence and the Yale Child Study Center explored partnerships between police departments and mental health clinicians in cities across the US. Cullman graduated from Brown University with honors (1999), where he majored in Urban Studies and the Visual Arts, and founded Yellow Cake Films in 2006. He lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Marshall Curry

Discussing the film If A Tree Falls on Thursday, March 31, 7:00pm

Marshall Curry got his start shooting, directing, and editing the documentary STREET FIGHT, which followed Cory Booker's first run for mayor of Newark, NJ. The film went on to be nominated for an Academy Award and an Emmy. STREET FIGHT won the Audience Awards at the Tribeca Film Festival, AFI/Discovery SilverDocs Festival, and Hot Docs Festival. It also received the Jury Prize for Best International Documentary at Hot Docs and was nominated for a Writer's Guild of America (WGA) Award. After STREET FIGHT, Curry was the Director and Producer, as well as one of the Cinematographers and Editors of the feature documentary, RACING DREAMS, called "The best movie of the year," by Scott Feinberg of the L.A. Times. Dreamworks is currently adapting it for a fictional remake. Prior to filmmaking, Marshall taught English in Guanajuato, Mexico, worked in public radio, and taught government in Washington DC. He is a graduate of Swarthmore College where he studied Comparative Religion and was a Eugene Lang Scholar. He was also a Jane Addams Fellow at Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy, where he wrote about the history, philosophy, and economics of non-profits.

 

Mark Dixon

Discussing the film YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip on Saturday, April 2, 7:00pm

Mark is a Producer/Director of YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip. Mark attended Stanford University and graduated in 1997 with a BS in Industrial Engineering. While familiarizing himself with web and media technologies during a 10 year career in Silicon Valley, Mark discovered that our planet Earth was having a tough time accommodating her most dominant species. He also realized that a sound retirement plan would optimally include a stable planet. In an attempt to address these concerns (not to mention an itch to see the country), he went on to launch YERT in 2006 with his college buddy, Ben Evans. Now, approximately 54 months later, he is thrilled to see the world premiere of the YERT feature film at EFFY. This is his first feature film.

 

Matthew Eckelman

Discussing the film YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip on Saturday, April 2, 7:00pm

Matthew Eckelman is a lecturer and postdoc at Yale University in the Schools of Engineering and Forestry & Environmental Studies and collaborates there with the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering and the Center for Industrial Ecology.  His research covers life cycle assessment, industrial environmental management, and environmental and sustainability strategy.  He is also part of a green engineering firm that consults with a range of businesses, organizations, and governments.  Prior to this, Matthew worked with the Massachusetts State Executive Office of Environmental Affairs and Design that Matters, a non-profit product design company, and was a Peace Corps science instructor in southern Nepal for several years. He holds a PhD in environmental engineering from Yale.

 

Ben Evans

Discussing the film YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip on Saturday, April 2, 7:00pm

Ben is a Director/Producer of YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip. Ben graduated from Stanford University in 1994 with a BS in Science, Technology, and Society...at least that's what he tells his family. After working as an actor for a decade in LA and NYC, Ben found himself looking for a way to marry his creative urges with his abiding passion for the environment and a growing concern about the future. Looking for adventure and a sense of greater purpose, Ben launched YERT in 2006 with his college buddy, Mark Dixon, and convinced his exceedingly understanding wife, Julie, to join him. After far too much time in an editing cave and well aware that one good four letter word deserves another, he is elated to be premiering YERT at EFFY. This is his first feature film.

 

Michael Faison

Director of Yale University’s Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium.
Discussing the film The City Dark on Wednesday, March 30, 7:00pm

Michael teaches several astronomy courses at Yale and holds series of public lectures on topics such as astrophysics, the history of astronomy, cultural astronomy, and observational astronomy (stargazing).  His research interests include Archaeoastronomy, Interstellar Medium structure and dynamics, Very Long Baseline Interferometry, and using small telescopes and digital planetarium systems for undergraduate education.

 

Dan Imhoff

Discussing the film Bag It on Friday, April 1, 7:00pm

Dan Imhoff is a researcher, author, and independent publisher who has concentrated for nearly 20 years on issues related to farming, the environment, and design. He is the president and co-founder of Watershed Media, a non-profit publishing house based in Northern California. Dan has appeared on hundreds of national and regional radio and television programs, including CBS Sunday Morning, Science Friday, and West Coast Live. His books have gained national attention with coverage in the San Francisco Chronicle, Newsweek, the San Jose Mercury News, the Los Angeles Times, and the Chicago Tribune. He has testified before Congress and spoken at numerous conferences, corporate and government offices, and college campuses, including Stanford University, the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, the University of California at Berkeley, and the Vermont Law School.

 

Martin Medina

Discussing the film Waste Land on Monday, March 28, 7:00pm

Martin Medina is originally from Mexico. He received his Ph.D. form Yale in 1997. He has collaborated with international organizations and academic institutions on waste management issues in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Has received numerous awards and grants, including four consecutive awards from the Global Development Network, the world's largest competition in development research. Author of over 45 publications, including a book, "The World's Scavengers: Salvaging for Sustainable Consumption and Production." Currently Sr. International Relations Specialist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Advisor to the Clinton Global Initiative project on the informal recycling sector in developing countries.

 

Liz Milwe

Discussing the film Bag It on Friday, April 1, 7:00pm

Liz Milwe is currently a member of the Westport Connecticut Representative Town Meeting (RTM). In 2008, she and three of her colleagues were able to enact an ordinance that banned plastic bags from Westport's shopping sector,  the first such ban in Connecticut. This work led to two intense years of research on the health and environmental risks of the plastic bag industry, the culmination of which is her internationally recognized artistic collaboration called "In The Bag." The "In The Bag" installation was just on display at the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) Conference in Nairobi, and is now on display at the Darien Nature Center in Darien Connecticut. Liz is also one of the founders of the Green Village Initiative,  a volunteer-based grass roots organization established in Fall 2008 to support citizens passionate about making environmental and community change through local action.

 

Nancy Moran

Discussing the film Queen of the Sun on Sunday, April 3, 6:00pm

Nancy A. Moran is the William H. Fleming Professor in Biology at the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department. Dr. Moran’s research involves the evolution of bacterial genomes and of symbiotic associations. She also works on general principles involving the evolution of genomes in bacteria. From 1986 to 2010, she served on the faculty of the University of Arizona, where she was a Regents’ Professor. In 2010, she won the International Prize for Biology. Dr. Moran was also awarded a MacArthur fellowship in 1997, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2004, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004, the American Academy of Microbiology in 2004, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2007. Dr. Moran holds a B.A. from the University of Texas and a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Michigan.

 

Paulo Moreira

Discussing the film Waste Land on Monday, March 28, 7:00pm

Paulo Moreira is Assistant Professor of Spanish & Portuguese at Yale. He has published scholarly articles and reviews on Octavio Paz and Carlos Drummond de Andrade and Mario de Andrade and Jean Toomer. He has also published a poetry volume called Quatro Partes and his poems and short stories appeared in Brazilian literary magazines and journals. Currently he is working on the translation of a collection of Faulkner’s short stories to Portuguese and working on a book about the short stories of William Faulkner, João Guimarães Rosa, and Juan Rulfo.

 

Tiffany Shlain

Discussing the film Connected on Tuesday, March 29, 7:00pm

Honored by Newsweek as one of the “Women Shaping the 21st Century,” Tiffany Shlain is a filmmaker, founder of The Webby Awards, co-founder of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences and a Henry Crown Fellow of The Aspen Institute. Her films have been selected by over 100 film festivals including Sundance, Tribeca, and Rotterdam, won 20 awards including Audience and Grand Jury Prizes, been translated into 8 languages and been shown at museums including LACMA, Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art and the Guggenheim. A celebrated thinker and speaker, she has advised Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, is on the advisory board of M.I.T.'s Geospatial Lab and presented the 2010 Commencement Address at UC Berkeley.

 

Taggart Siegel

Discussing the film Queen of the Sun on Sunday, April 3, 6:00pm

Taggart Siegel has been directing award-winning documentaries and dramas for 25 years that reflect cultural diversity with absorbing style. From spiritual elders struggling to preserve traditions in alien environments to marginalized youth surviving hostile streets, the subjects of his films present vital perspectives rarely seen in mainstream media. THE REAL DIRT ON FARMER JOHN won 31 International Film Festivals awards and is currently being released theatrically around the world. Siegel’s films bring compelling voices and visions to a global audience. Siegel is the co-founder of Collective Eye, Inc., a non-profit media organization based in San Francisco and Portland, Oregon.

 

Richard Stevens

Discussing the film The City Dark on Wednesday, March 30, 7:00pm

Richard Stevens received a B.S. in Genetics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Washington in Seattle.  He has been working for a long time trying to help figure out why people get cancer.  A perplexing challenge which Stevens began to engage in the late 1970s is the confounding mystery of why breast cancer risk rises so dramatically as societies industrialize.  He proposed in 1987 a radical new theory that use of electric lighting, resulting in lighted nights, might produce ‘circadian disruption’ causing changes in the hormones relevant to breast cancer risk, and thereby play an important role in breast cancer causation worldwide.  Accumulating evidence has generally supported the theory.  Stevens teaches medical/dental students, graduate students in the PhD program, and MPH students at UConn Health Center.

 

Tiaõ (Sebastiao Carlos dos Santos)

Discussing the film Waste Land on Monday, March 328, 7:00pm

Tiaõ is the young, charismatic President of ACAMJG (the Association of Recycling Pickers of Jardim Gramacho), a co-operative to improve the lives of his fellow catadores, featured in the film Waste Land. Inspired by the political texts he found in the waste, Tiaõ had to convince his co-workers that organizing could make a difference. Tiaõ has been picking since he was 11 years old.

 

Mary Evelyn Tucker

Discussing the film Connected on Tuesday, March 29, 7:00pm
Discussing the film Journey of the Universe on Friday, March 25, 7:00pm & Saturday March 26, 5:30pm

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School and the Department of Religious Studies. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. She is also Research Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard. She is the author of Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase (Open Court Press, 2003), Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism (SUNY, 1989) and The Philosophy of Qi (Columbia University Press, 2007). She co-edited Worldviews and Ecology (Orbis, 1994), Buddhism and Ecology (Harvard, 1997), Confucianism and Ecology (Harvard, 1998), and Hinduism and Ecology (Harvard, 2000) and When Worlds Converge (Open Court, 2002). With Tu Weiming she edited two volumes on Confucian Spirituality (Crossroad, 2004). She also co-edited a Daedalus volume titled Religion and Ecology: Can the Climate Change? (2001). She edited several of Thomas Berry’s books: Evening Thoughts (Sierra Club Books and University of California Press, 2006), The Sacred Universe (Columbia University Press, 2009), Christian Future and the Fate of Earth (Orbis Book, 2009). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). She served on the International Earth Charter Drafting Committee from 1997-2000 and is a member of the Earth Charter International Council. B.A. Trinity College, M.A. SUNY Fredonia, M.A. Fordham University, PhD Columbia University.

 

John Wargo

Discussing the film Bag It on Friday, April 1, 7:00pm

John Wargo is a Professor of Risk Analysis, Environmental Policy, and Political Science, and Chair of the Yale College Environmental Studies Major and Program. He has just written Green Intelligence Creating Environments that Protect Human Health published by Yale Press. The book won the Independent Publishers Award of Gold Medal in the field of “environment, ecology, and nature” for 2010. It also won the 2010 Connecticut Book Award in non-fiction. It was chosen as one of Scientific American’s favorite books for 2009. Professor Wargo also wrote Our Children’s Toxic Legacy: How Science and Law Fail to Protect Us from Pesticides, published by Yale University Press in 1998, presenting a history of law and science governing pesticides with special attention to the vulnerability of infants and children. The book won the American Association of Publishers award as the Best Scholarly & Professional Book in Government and Political Science in 1998. He is also co-author of Ecosystems: Science and Management published by Springer-Verlag in 1998. Wargo participated in several National Academy of Sciences committees, analyzing children’s exposure to toxic substances. He also has testified before both Senate and House Committees, and been an advisor to the White House, the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture organization, the EPA, USDA, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on environmental threats to children’s health. He has participated in the design of federal and state laws and regulations intended to reduce human exposures to air pollution, pesticides, plastics, mercury, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

 

Robert Zinn

Discussing the film The City Dark on Wednesday, March 30, 7:00pm

Robert Zinn is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Yale's Department of Astronomy. He has researched the structure and evolution of the Milky Way for more than 30 years. His fascination with astronomy began as a teenager in West Hartford, CT when he built his own telescope to view the night sky from the backyard of his parents' house. Although the sky is much brighter now is suburbia, he still explores the Universe with his own telescope.

 

Click here to see the speakers at this year's festival.


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2011 Jury


Click here to view the 2012 Jury.

The 2011 EFFY Jury is made of Yale faculty, staff, Master's students, and undergraduates. They will decide which films take home the Best Feature and Best Short awards.

 

Dr. Nadine Unger, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Assistant Professor

Nadine Unger is Assistant Professor of Climate Science in the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. She is a former member of the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain. In 2004, she directed a production of Waxing West by Romanian playwright Saviana Stanescu performed at International House in New York City. She was a member of The Shakespeare Workshop in New York City between 2004-2008. Performances include Feste in Twelfth Night and Cecile de Volanges in Dangerous Liasons. She is currently developing an outreach theater project about climate change.

 

Johannes DeYoung, Yale School of Art, Lecturer

Johannes DeYoung is a video artist and Lecturer at the Yale School of Art. His work has been exhibited internationally, with shows in New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, and Melbourne, Australia. Mr. DeYoung received his MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI.

 

Rachel Kramer, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master’s Student

Rachel Kramer is a Masters of Environmental Science candidate at Yale with interests in the social ecology of conservation and development. Rachel recently created a short film for National Wildlife Federation on emerging solutions to deforestation for cattle expansion in the Brazilian Amazon that was selected for screening at the 2010 Cancun Climate & Development Days film festival. Rachel has been featured in the Madagascar episode of the French nature series, "Ushuaia" for her lemur conservation and community development work, and her photography has been published in print and online media including National Geographic NewsWatch and National Wildlife Magazine.

 

Mike Carroll, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master’s Student

When he couldn't pull off R-rated cable films at friends' houses as a youth in the 1980s, Mike Carroll watched random movies on local Boston UHF channels 38 and 56, often times on a 12-inch black and white television. As a teenager, it slowly dawned on him that films were seriously worthy things, leading to Peckinpah to Nichols, Kopple to Herzog, and both Andersons to Louis C.K. He is currently enrolled at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies focusing on organizational sustainability management and performs related work at the educational level.

 

Ritika Tewari, Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Doctoral/Post-Doctoral Student

Rikita Tewari is a postgraduate fellow from TERI, India, and brings along the perspectives of the developing world to pressing environmental concerns. Rikita is pursuing Masters in Natural Resources Management back home. Analyzing movies is one of her hobbies, and at EFFY she would be looking at the message each film conveys and how effectively it does so.

 

Emily Levada, Yale School of Management, MBA Student

Emily Levada is a first year MBA student at the Yale School of Management (SOM). Prior to coming to Yale, Emily worked for five years as a production manager at The Studio Theatre in Washington, DC. After first attending the DC Environmental Film Festival a number of years ago, Emily joined an environmental political action committee in DC and spearheaded an environmental awareness initiative at her company. Emily is excited to be promoting both the arts and the environment at Yale through EFFY.

 

Josh Glick, Film Studies and American Studies, PhD Student

Josh Glick is a PhD candidate at Yale in the departments of Film Studies and American Studies. His research interests are focused on documentary media, race and representation in popular culture, and 20th century social movements. Josh is currently co-teaching a seminar on digital documentary and the internet that gives special attention to contemporary politics, activism, and the environment.

 

Kiku Langford, Yale Divinity School, Masters Student

J. Kiku Langford is a first year M.A.R. candidate at Yale Divinity School where she co-leads the student group FERNS (Faith, Ecology, Nature, Religion and Spirituality). She grew up in Tucson, AZ and attended Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH where she majored in Studio Art. In 2008 she worked for the International Animation Festival in Hiroshima, Japan, and in 2010 she helped to distribute the documentary film "Orgasm Inc," for director Liz Canner. Kiku's future goals include being a mother, having a cow and a farm, and helping to develop farm-to-school programs in New England.

 

Jennifer Newman, Yale School of Drama, Masters Student

Jennifer Newman is a third-year MFA candidate at the Yale School of Drama. Prior to coming to Yale Jennifer performed on Broadway in Disney’s The Lion King and was a Radio City Rockette. She also had the immense pleasure of performing with Michael Jackson at Madison Square Garden. Her love of film dates back to watching West Side Story and Grease, Car Wash and of course Star Wars. The documentary film Baraka changed her life.

 

Liz Godar, Yale College Student

Liz Godar is a first-year Yale College undergraduate from St. Louis, Missouri. She conducted research on carbon sequestration in Environmental/Chemical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis and worked on an award winning environmental documentary entitled Unleaded. As a high school student, she represented the youth of St. Louis in environmental rallies and press conferences, headed political action for St. Louis Interschool Ecological Council, wrote published articles to raise awareness about environmental issues, and led the environmental club at her school in various campaigns. She served as a representative for the U.S. in a State Department sponsored program called Ocean for Life in which she studied ocean science and worked with National Geographic photographers to document themes of ocean diversity, conversation, and education.

 

Patrick Cage, Yale College Student

Patrick Cage is a freshman Ecology & Evolutionary Biology major and hopes to pursue a career in conservation biology. He is a Pierson College STEP coordinator, working to improve sustainability throughout Yale's undergraduate population, and a member of the Yale Animal Welfare Alliance, as well as a volunteer at the New Haven Police Animal Shelter. Patrick enjoys bicycling as a means of transportation, vegan cooking, and botanizing.

 

Click here to view the 2012 Jury.


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EFFY 2012 Line Up


Yale Environmental Film Festival Examines Humanity’s Impact

New Haven, Conn.—An Academy Award-nominated film on Japan’s tsunami, an advance screening of Disneynature’s Chimpanzee, and appearances by film directors are some of the highlights of the fourth annual Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY) from April 9 to 15.

“We can’t wait to share these films,” said Paul Thomson, the festival’s managing director. “EFFY 2012 is about our relationship with the environment. The films examine humanity’s impact on the planet, but really they are deeply personal stories of our connection with the world."

There will be two East Coast premieres, and more than half of the films will make their New England premieres. All screenings are free and open to the public and will take place at the Whitney Humanities Center on 53 Wall Street, at the Yale University Art Gallery on 1111 Chapel Street, and at Criterion Cinemas on 85 Temple Street. Panel discussions with filmmakers, special guests and Yale faculty will be held after each film.

For the full line up, film and filmmaker details, and to watch trailers, visit http://environment.yale.edu/film/films.

The films are:

The Island President (Connecticut Premiere). President Mohamed Nasheed of the Maldives, the lowest-lying country in the world, takes up the fight to keep his homeland from disappearing under the sea.

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom was recently nominated for an Academy Award. Survivors in the areas hardest hit by Japan’s tsunami find the courage to revive and rebuild as cherry blossom season begins. The film is a stunning visual haiku about the ephemeral nature of life and the healing power of Japan’s most beloved flower.

Surviving Progress (New England Premiere). Executive Producer Martin Scorsese ponders the meaning of progress when its price is the prolific consumption of the world’s natural resources.

The Atomic States of America (New England Premiere) takes viewers on a journey to reactor communities around the country, exposing the truths and myths of nuclear power, and posing the question of whether or not man can responsibly produce nuclear power.

Chimpanzee (Pre-Release Screening) Disneynature’s newest True Life Adventure introduces Oscar, a young chimpanzee whose playful curiosity and zest for discovery light up the African forest until a twist of fate leaves Oscar to fend for himself with a little help from an unexpected ally. 

Bestiaire (New England Premiere). Denis Côté’s wordless film puts humans and animals on display. It is an elegant, bewitching meditation on the nature of sentience and the boundaries between nature and “civilization.”

Eating Alabama (East Coast Premiere). A young couple returns home to Alabama where they set out to eat only food grown in the state for a year. But as they navigate the agro-industrial gastronomical complex, they soon realize that nearly everything about the food system has changed since farmers once populated their family histories.

Big Boys Gone Bananas!* (East Coast Premiere). A follow up to Bananas!*, which screened at EFFY 2010, this is the true story about a Swedish filmmaker and a banana corporation. Dirty tricks, lawsuits, manipulation, and the price of free speech. Both Bananas!* and Big Boys Gone Bananas!* will be screened.

The Last Mountain. In West Virginia a small but passionate group of citizens are trying to stop Big Coal corporations from continuing the devastating practice of Mountain Top Removal.

The Whale is the true story of a killer whale (orca) named Luna who lost his family in British Columbia and forms a unique bond with people. Narrated by Ryan Reynolds and produced by EFFY co-founder Eric Desatnik.

“We selected our films from hundreds of submissions. We have developed a powerful program that covers a variety of important environmental issues,” says Richard Miron, director of programming. “These films will make you laugh, cry and rethink what it means to be human. People are going to be talking about these films. This year’s lineup is the strongest yet.”

EFFY is organized and run by students at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and is the largest student-run environmental film festival in the world. Major sponsors of the 2012 festival include Films at the Whitney, The Study at Yale Hotel, the Class of 1980 Fund at F&ES, Graduate and Professional Student Senate at Yale and the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

CONTACT:     Paul Thomson 202-679-5494 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
 


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Poster and Video Contest


Design the EFFY Poster and Promo Video

 

Promotional Video: Direct and edit an effective, eye-catching, and informational promotional video for the 2011 Environmental Film Festival at Yale. This video will be distributed online via e-mail to thousands of people and will also be featured on the EFFY website in the months prior to the film festival.
 
Poster: Your goal is to design the official poster for the 2012 Environmental Film Festival at Yale. The winning poster will be displayed both physically and electronically across the Yale campus and to the entire New Haven community.
 
RULES
 
Promotional Video:  
•    The video must have a running time of two minutes or less.
•    The video must include the EFFY logo, the dates of the festival (April 9-15, 2012), and the website (environment.yale.edu/film).
•    Submit the video (along with the entry form) as a high-quality Quicktime .mov file on a data DVD to the following address by 5pm on January 6, 2012: Environmental Film Festival at Yale, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511
•    On the DVD/CD, write your name, the title of the promo, and your contact information.

Poster:
•    The poster must have a resolution that is printable for up to 18x24 in.
•    There are no color restrictions.
•    You must include the EFFY logo (download here), the dates of the festival (April 9-15, 2012), and the website (environment.yale.edu/film).
•    Submit the design along with the entry form as a full-resolution file on a data CD to the following address by 5pm on January 6, 2012: Environmental Film Festival at Yale, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511

RESOURCES

Contest Submission Form

EFFY logos


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Posters from Past Years


EFFY 2011 Winners


The 3rd Annual Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY) has announced the 2011 award winners. THE CITY DARK, directed by Ian Cheney, takes home the top juried prize for a feature film. The jury, comprised of Yale students and faculty, awarded TRANSITION TOWN TOTNES the top honor for a short film. The EFFY Audience Award, as determined by ballots distributed to filmgoers, was tied between WASTE LAND and YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip.

The student-run film festival, housed within the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, showcased 8 feature films and 9 shorts from March 28 to April 3 and hosted a record number of attendees from across the state and nation.
 
The documentary THE CITY DARK (East Coast Premiere), explores the psychological, societal, and environmental implications of light pollution.
 
TRANSITION TOWN TOTNES, directed by Deborah Koons Garcia, highlights the growing movement of one transition town in Totnes, England, where citizens are engaging in community-based organizing to live more sustainably.
 
WASTE LAND, a moving documentary about the population who lives off of the largest landfill in the world, was accompanied by a talk with one of the film’s stars Tiaõ Santos, President of ACAMJG (the Association of Recycling Pickers of Jardim Gramacho) of Brazil. “It is a great festival,” said Tiaõ. “I was honored to be part of it and hope it is only the beginning of a long time relationship of the Brazilian pickers of Recyclable Material and Yale.”
 
YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip, a documentary about 3 twenty-somethings barreling across all 50 states in 52 weeks in search of local solutions to climate change, world premiered at EFFY.
 
Other highlights of the festival included EFFY After Dark, a party to celebrate the world premiere of YERT, a special screening of the 2011 Academy Award-nominated short documentary THE WARRIORS OF QUIGANG: A Chinese Village Strikes Back, and a special advanced screening of Disneynature’s AFRICAN CATS (which releases nation-wide April 22, 2011).
 
“The films in our line up this year highlight the variety of emotions we experience when we think about our planet and its future: hope as well as devastation, awe as well as caution,” says Catherine Fontana, Director of Public Affairs.  “Even though the 2011 festival is over, the fight for our planet’s future endures.”
 
Major sponsors of the 2011 festival include The Study at Yale Hotel, alumnus Adam Wolfensohn, Films at the Whitney, School of Forestry 1980 Fund, Graduate and Professional Student Senate at Yale, Yale Environment 360, ecosystem Notebooks, 360 State Street, and Blue State Coffee.


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Queen of the Sun


 

QUEEN OF THE SUN: What Are the Bees Telling Us? is a profound, alternative look at the global bee crisis from Taggart Siegel, director of THE REAL DIRT ON FARMER JOHN. Taking us on a journey through the catastrophic disappearance of bees and the mysterious world of the beehive, this engaging and ultimately uplifting film weaves an unusual and dramatic story of the heartfelt struggles of beekeepers, scientists and philosophers from around the world including Michael Pollan, Gunther Hauk and Vandana Shiva. Together they reveal both the problems and the solutions in renewing a culture in balance with nature.

Discussion to follow moderated by Sir Peter Crane, Dean of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, with filmmaker Taggart Siegel and Dr. Nancy Moran, Yale Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

About the Filmmaker

An independent filmmaker since the mid-1980’s, Taggart Siegel is best known as the director of the 2006 grass-roots hit THE REAL DIRT ON FARMER JOHN. This critically acclaimed feature documentary about a maverick visionary farmer, won 31 international film festivals awards and was released theatrically around the world. Siegel is also known for his award-winning films THE SPLIT HORN: Life of a Hmong Shaman in America, BETWEEN TWO WORLDS and BLUE COLLAR A BUDDHA which capture the struggle of refugees in America. He is the co-founder of Collective Eye, Inc., a non-profit media production and distribution organization based in Portland, Oregon and San Francisco.

Preceded by: Transition Town Totnes


Introduced by filmmaker Deborah Koons Garcia.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010
Running Time: 83 Minutes

Website: www.queenofthesun.com

Director: Taggart Siegel
Producers: Taggart Siegel, Jon Betz
Editors: Jon Betz / Taggart Siegel
Director of Photography: Taggart Siegel
Associate Producers: Donald Siegel, Eric Stolberg, George Mitchell, Mike Quinn


African Cats


Special Advance Screening

An epic true story set against the backdrop of one of the wildest places on Earth, “African Cats” captures the real-life love, humor and determination of the majestic kings of the savanna. The story features Mara, an endearing lion cub who strives to grow up with her mother’s strength, spirit and wisdom; Sita, a fearless cheetah and single mother of five mischievous newborns; and Fang, a proud leader of the pride who must defend his family from a once banished lion. Disneynature brings “The Lion King” to life on the big screen in this True Life Adventure directed by Keith Scholey and Alastair Fothergill (“Earth”). An awe-inspiring adventure blending family bonds with the power and cunning of the wild, “African Cats” leaps into theatres worldwide beginning on Earth Day 2011. For more information about the movie and the “See ‘African Cats,’ Save the Savanna” initiative, check out Disney.com/AfricanCats.

Question and Answer session to follow with Mary Wykstra of Action for Cheetahs Kenya and Paul Thomson of Ewaso Lions Project.

About DisneyNature

Disneynature, the first new Disney-branded film label from The Walt Disney Studios in more than 60 years, was launched in April 2008 to bring the world’s top nature filmmakers together to share a wide variety of wildlife subjects and stories with theatrical audiences. “Earth” (opening Earth Day 2009) was the first film to premiere domestically under the new label, and garnered a record-breaking opening weekend for a nature documentary. Its “Buy a Ticket, Plant a Tree” initiative led to the planting of 2.7 million trees in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest.  Hitting theaters on April 22, 2010, “Oceans” was the third highest grossing feature-length nature film in history. Its “See ‘Oceans,’ Save Oceans” initiative helped establish 40,000 acres of marine protected area in The Bahamas, preserving essential coral reefs. Walt Disney was a pioneer in wildlife documentary filmmaking, producing 13 True-Life Adventure motion pictures between 1949 and 1960, which earned eight Academy Awards®. For more information about Disneynature, check out disneynature.com like us on Facebook: facebook.com/Disneynature, and follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/Disneynature. For more information about the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, please visit Disney.com/conservation.


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Rated G
Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 90 minutes

Website: Disney.com/AfricanCats

Narrator: Samuel L. Jackson
Directors: Keith Scholey, Alastair Fothergill
Producers: Keith Scholey, Alix Tidmarsh


EFFY After Dark 2011


Join us in celebrating the world premiere of YERT with live music, short films and drinks specials. No cover/open to the public/21+.

Venue: GPSCY bar, 204 York St., 2nd floor ballroom


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YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip


 

World Premiere

YERT is a groundbreaking adventure and a celebration of the American spirit in the face of adversity - a thought-provoking, inspiring, and sometimes hilarious, documentary about the courageous and creative individuals, groups, businesses and leaders of this country who are tackling the greatest environmental threats in history. Called into action by the ever increasing threats of planetary catastrophe (from climate change to toxic pollution, from water scarcity to habitat destruction), Mark Dixon, Ben Evans, and Julie Dingman Evans upended their lives, pooled collective life-savings, and set off on a first-of-its-kind, 50-state, year-long journey of discovery to personalize sustainability and to answer a critical question: Are we doomed?

Discussion to follow with filmmakers Mark Dixon, Ben Evans, and Julie Dingman Evans. Moderated by Matthew Eckelman, Lecturer and Associate Research Scientist at Yale.

About the Filmmakers

Ben Evans, Director/Producer of YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip
Ben graduated from Stanford University in 1994 with a BS in Science, Technology, and Society...at least that's what he tells his family. After working as an actor for a decade in LA and NYC, Ben found himself looking for a way to marry his creative urges with his abiding passion for the environment and a growing concern about the future. Looking for adventure and a sense of greater purpose, Ben launched YERT in 2006 with his college buddy, Mark Dixon, and convinced his exceedingly understanding wife, Julie, to join him. After far too much time in an editing cave and well aware that one good four letter word deserves another, he is elated to  be premiering YERT at EFFY. This is his first feature film.

Mark Dixon, Producer/Director of YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip
Mark attended Stanford University and graduated in 1997 with a BS in Industrial Engineering. While familiarizing himself with web and media technologies during a 10 year career in Silicon Valley, Mark discovered that our planet Earth was having a tough time accommodating her most dominant species. He also realized that a sound retirement plan would optimally include a stable planet. In an attempt to address these concerns (not to mention an itch to see the country), he went on to launch YERT in 2006 with his college buddy, Ben Evans. Now, approximately 54 months later, he is thrilled to see the world premiere of the YERT feature film at EFFY. This is his first feature film.

Preceded by: Wee Wise Words

 


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 90 Minutes

Website: www.yert.com

Director: Ben Evans and Mark Dixon
Producers: Mark Dixon, Ben Evans
Co-Producer: Gill Holland, Scott Irick
Editors: Ben Evans, Scott Irick
Cinematography: Ben Evans, Mark Dixon, Julie Evans, Erika Bowman
Associate Producers: Scott Irick, Richard Citrin, Sheila Collins


Short Films


 

Warriors of Qiugang

USA/China, 39 min. This 2011 Oscar-nominated film, shot in China over three years, chronicles how one Chinese village stood up against a polluting chemical plant. 2011 Academy Award-nominated documentary co-produced by Yale Environment 360 and filmmakers Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon. 

When the Water Ends

USA, 16 min.The film tells the story of conflict between tribal groups in Kenya and Ethiopa over water and land, and the increasingly dire drought conditions facing parts of East Africa. Produced by Yale Environment 360 in collaboration with MediaStorm, Directed by Evan Abramson.

preceded by:

11 Degrees

Scotland, 8 min. A film about the struggle of a Scottish ski resort to adapt to the consequences of the climate change and the decrease in skiers. Directed by Anna Ewert.


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Bag It


 

BAG IT follows Jeb Berrier, an average American guy who is admittedly not a “tree hugger,” who makes a pledge to stop using plastic bags. This simple action gets Jeb thinking about all kinds of plastic as he embarks on a global tour to unravel the complexities of our plastic world. When Jeb’s journey takes a personal twist, we see how our crazy-for-plastic world has finally caught up to us and what we can do about it. Today. Right now.

The film examines our society’s use and abuse of plastic. The film focuses on plastic as it relates to our society’s throwaway mentality, our culture of convenience, our over consumption of unnecessary, disposable products and packaging—things that we use one time and then, without another thought, throw them away. Where is AWAY?? Away is over flowing landfills, clogged rivers, islands of trash in our oceans, and even our very own toxic bodies. Jeb travels the globe on a fact-finding mission—not realizing that after his simple resolution, plastic will never look the same again!

Discussion to follow with author, researcher & publisher Dan Imhoff, and artist & activist Liz Milwe. Moderated by John Wargo, Professor of Risk Analysis, Environmental Policy, and Political Science.

About the Filmmaker

Born in Jamaica and raised in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, Suzan Beraza’s thought-provoking films challenge viewers to examine their lives and consider the impact of their choices. Social and environmental issues pervade her work. Her films have appeared on PBS, and at many festivals, winning top awards at Worldfest, Montreal Film Festival, San Luis Obispo Film Festival, EarthVision, and Mountainfilm in Telluride Film Festival. Documentaries she has worked on have also won three Telly Awards, including Best Documentary.

Preceded by: The Majestic Plastic Bag

4 minutes. A humorous mockumentary about a plastic bag’s migration to its “home” in the Pacific Garbage Patch. Narrated by Jeremy Irons. It was produced by Heal The Bay to help put an end plastic pollution.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010
Running Time: 78 minutes

Website: www.bagitmovie.com

Director: Susan Beraza
Producers: Michelle Hill, Susan Beraza
Editor: Casey Nay
Director of Photography: Leigh Reagan
Executive Producers: Judith Kohin


If A Tree Falls


 

East Coast Premiere

In December 2005, Daniel McGowan was arrested by Federal agents in a nationwide sweep of radical environmentalists involved with the Earth Liberation Front-- a group the FBI has called America’s “number one domestic terrorism threat.” For years, the ELF—operating in separate anonymous cells without any central leadership—had launched spectacular arsons against dozens of businesses they accused of destroying the environment: timber companies, SUV dealerships, wild horse slaughterhouses, and a $12 million ski lodge at Vail, Colorado. With the arrest of Daniel and thirteen others, the government had cracked what was probably the largest ELF cell in America and brought down the group responsible for the very first ELF arsons in this country.

IF A TREE FALLS: A STORY OF THE EARTH LIBERATION FRONT tells the remarkable story of the rise and fall of this ELF cell, by focusing on the transformation and radicalization of one of its members. Part coming-of-age tale, part cops-and-robbers thriller, the film interweaves a verite chronicle of Daniel on house arrest as he faces life in prison, with a dramatic recounting of the events that led to his involvement with the group. And along the way it asks hard questions about environmentalism, activism, and the way we define terrorism.

Drawing from striking archival footage -- much of it never before seen -- and intimate interviews with ELF members, and with the prosecutor and detective who were chasing them, IF A TREE FALLS explores the tumultuous period from 1995 until early 2001 when environmentalists were clashing with timber companies and law enforcement, and the word “terrorism” had not yet been altered by 9/11.

Discussion to follow with filmmakers Marshall Curry and Sam Cullman. Moderated by Aliya Haq, Yale Masters student and former Greenpeace Organizing Manager.

About the Filmmaker

Marshall Curry got his start shooting, directing, and editing the documentary, STREET FIGHT, which followed Cory Booker’s first run for mayor of Newark, NJ and was nominated for an Academy Award and an Emmy. After STREET FIGHT, Curry was the Director and Producer, as well as one of the Directors of Photography and Editors of the feature documentary, RACING DREAMS.

In 2005 Marshall was selected by Filmmaker Magazine as one of "25 New Faces of Independent Film", and he was awarded the International Documentary Association (IDA) Jacqueline Donnet Filmmaker Award.  In 2007 he received the International Trailblazer Award at MIPDOC in Cannes.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010
Running Time: 85 Minutes

Website: www.ifatreefallsfilm.com

Director: Marshall Curry
Co-director: Sam Cullman
Producers: Marshall Curry, Sam Cullman
Editor: Matthew Hamachek, Marshall Curry
Director of Photography: Sam Cullman
Executive Producer: Stephen Bannatyne


The City Dark


 

East Coast Premiere

THE CITY DARK chronicles the disappearance of darkness. When filmmaker Ian Cheney (director of KING CORN) moves to New York City and discovers skies almost completely devoid of stars, a simple question – what do we lose, when we lost the night? – spawns a journey to America’s brightest and darkest corners. Astronomers, cancer researchers, ecologists and philosophers provide glimpses of what is lost in the glare of city lights; blending a humorous, searching tone with poetic footage of the night sky, what unravels is an introduction to the science of the dark, and an exploration of the human relationship to the stars.

Discussion to follow with director Ian Cheney, author & inventor Bob Crelin, epidemiologist Richard Stevens, and Robert Zinn, Yale Professor of Astronomy. Moderated by Michael Faison, Director of Yale University’s Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium.

About the Filmmaker

Ian Cheney is a Brooklyn-based documentary filmmaker. He grew up in New England, co-created and starred in the feature documentary KING CORN, directed THE GREENING OF SOUTHIE and the upcoming feature documentary THE CITY DARK. He currently leads Wicked Delicate, a documentary and advocacy project in Brooklyn, runs the TRUCK FARM project, and is one of the founders of FOOD CORPS. He is a graduate of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Preceded by: The Herd

Ireland, 4 min. Directed by Ken Wardrop. A farmer finds a deer befriending his herd of cattle.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010
Running Time: 84 minutes

Website: www.thecitydark.com

Director: Ian Cheney
Producer: Ian Cheney
Editors: Ian Cheney, Frederick Shanahan
Director of Photography: Taylor Gentry


Filmmaking Workshop with Ian Cheney


Special Event

Join award-winning filmmaker Ian Cheney, as he shares film cips, stories from the field, and practical advice on making films. Topics covered include tips for funding, shooting, and finishing an independent documentary and the role of documentary storytelling in environmental advocacy and education.

Free and open to the public. RSVP required at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

About Ian Cheney

Ian Cheney is a Brooklyn-based documentary filmmaker. He grew up in New England, co-created and starred in the feature documentary KING CORN, directed THE GREENING OF SOUTHIE and the upcoming feature documentary THE CITY DARK. He currently leads Wicked Delicate, a documentary and advocacy project in Brooklyn, runs the TRUCK FARM project, and is one of the founders of FOOD CORPS. He is a graduate of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.


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Connected


 

East Coast Premiere

Between texts and tweets, memes and microchips, we’ve become conditioned to break the world down into byte-sized bits. In the process we’ve stopped seeing the forest for the trees, never mind the root system that connects them all. In Connected, Tiffany Shlain—award-winning filmmaker and founder of The Webby Awards—sets out to explore these bonds with the help of her father, acclaimed author and thinker Dr. Leonard Shlain. When the unexpected happens during the making of the film, Tiffany is forced to reexamine everything she thought she knew about life, relationships, and connectedness. Tracing interdependence through history, she discovers the surprising links between right brain and left; alphabets and power; honey bees and stress; hormones and happiness; technology and nature; progress and consequences; and parents and children. The result is a personal film with universal resonance that encourages viewers to make connections of their own. Offering an exhilarating stream-of-consciousness ride, Connected is a journey through the interconnectedness of humankind, nature, progress and morality at the dawn of the 21st century. For centuries we’ve been declaring independence. With insight, curiosity, and humor, this film explores whether it’s time to declare our interdependence.

Discussion to follow with director Tiffany Shlain. Moderated by Mary Evelyn Tucker, Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale.

About the Filmmaker

Honored by Newsweek as one of the “Women Shaping the 21st Century,” Tiffany Shlain is a filmmaker, founder of The Webby Awards, co-founder of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences and a Henry Crown Fellow of The Aspen Institute. Her films have been selected by over 100 film festivals including Sundance, Tribeca, and Rotterdam, won 20 awards including Audience and Grand Jury Prizes, been translated into 8 languages and been shown at museums including LACMA, Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art and the Guggenheim. A celebrated thinker and speaker, she has advised Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, is on the advisory board of M.I.T.'s Geospatial Lab and presented the 2010 Commencement Address at UC Berkeley.

Preceded by: U: Uranium

11 min. Directed by Sarah Del Seronde. A look at the contamination of the waters and health of Native and non-Native communities near the Grand Canyon and across the Southwest as a result of decades of uranium mining and milling.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010

Website: www.connectedthefilm.com

Narrator: Peter Coyote
Director: Tiffany Shlain
Producers: Sasha Lewis & Carlton Evans
Animation: Stefan Nadelman
Composer: Gunnard Doboze
Editors: Tiffany Shlain and Dalan McNabola
Presented by The Moxie Institute and Impact Partners


Waste Land


Filmed over nearly three years, WASTE LAND follows renowned artist Vik Muniz as he journeys from his home base in Brooklyn to his native Brazil and the world's largest garbage  dump,  Jardim Gramacho, located on the outskirts of Rio de Janeiro. There he photographs an eclectic band of "catadores"  --  self-designated pickers of recyclable materials.  Muniz's initial objective was to "paint" the  catadores  with  garbage.  However, his  collaboration  with  these  inspiring  characters  as  they recreate photographic images of themselves out of garbage reveals both the dignity and despair of the catadores  as  they  begin  to  re-imagine their lives. Director Lucy Walker (DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND, BLINDSIGHT and COUNTDOWN  TO  ZERO)  and co-directors  João Jardim  and Karen Harley have great access to the entire  process  and,  in  the  end,  offer  stirring  evidence  of  the  transformative  power of art and the alchemy of the human spirit. 2011 Academy Award Nominee, winner of the Audience Award World Cinema Documentary, Sundance Film Festival 2010.

Discussion to follow with Tiaõ (Sebastiao Carlos dos Santos), President of ACAMJG (the Association of Recycling Pickers of Jardim Gramacho, Brazil, who is featured in the film. Also with Martin Medina, Advisor to the Clinton Global Initiative project on recycling sector in developing countries. Moderated by Paulo Moreira, Assistant Professor of Spanish & Portuguese at Yale.

About Lucy Walker

Lucy Walker uses dramatic filmmaking techniques to make documentary films, following memorable characters on transformative journeys that grant unique access inside closed worlds. Walker's films include DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND, BLINDSIGHT and COUNTDOWN TO ZERO. Walker's credits also include Nickelodeon's "Blue's Clues," for which she was twice nominated for Emmy Awards for Outstanding Direction in a Children's Series, and several award-winning narrative short films. Walker grew up in London, England, won a Fulbright Scholarship to attend New York University's Graduate Film Program, where she earned her MFA.

Preceded by: Life in a Land Fill

1 minute. DIrected by Jack Quinn. An artistic take on the odds and ends found in a landfill.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2010
Running Time: 98 Minutes

Website: www.wastelandmovie.com

Director: Lucy Walker
Co-directors: Co-directed by João Jardim and Karen Harley
Producers: Angus Aynsley, Hank Levine
Co-Producer: Peter Martin
Editor: Pedro Kos
Director of Photography: Dudu Miranda
Executive Producers: Fernando Meirelles, Miel de Botton Aynsley, Andrea Barata Ribeiro, Jackie de Botton


Journey of the Universe


Special Pre-Festival Screening and World Premiere

Ask acclaimed author and evolutionary philosopher Brian Thomas Swimme about our role as humans in this awe-inspiring universe, and his insights will light up the night skies.

As our host, co-writer, and fellow traveler, he shares his infectious curiosity about life’s biggest questions in the epic JOURNEY OF THE UNIVERSE.  This documentary film project and companion book is a collaboration of Swimme and historian of religions Mary Evelyn Tucker.  They weave a tapestry that draws together scientific discoveries in astronomy, geology, biology, ecology, and biodiversity with humanistic insights concerning the nature of the universe.   

Using his skills as a masterful storyteller, Swimme connects such big picture issues as the birth of the cosmos 14 billion years ago – to the invisible frontiers of the human genome – as well as to our current impact on Earth’s evolutionary dynamics. Through his engaging and thoughtful observations audiences everywhere will discover the profound role we play in this intricate web of life. From the Big Bang–to the epic impact humans have on the planet today–this film is designed to inspire a new and closer relationship with Earth in a period of growing environmental and social crisis.

Beautifully filmed in high-definition, our grand tour begins on the historically rich Greek island of Samos, birthplace of mathematician and philosopher Pythagoras. Disembarking on the island at dawn, Swimme expertly guides us on an exhilarating trek through time and space, sharing a wondrous view of cosmic evolution as a process based on immense creativity, connection, and interdependence.  After the toll of midnight, he sets sail into the star-lit waters of the North Aegean Sea, leaving audiences with a sense of wonder at the mystery, complexity and connectivity that permeates the Earth and universe from the very beginning.

Big science, big history, big story, this one-of-a-kind JOURNEY OF THE UNIVERSE film project has been created by an acclaimed team of internationally-recognized scientists, scholars, and award-winning filmmakers.

SCREENING INFORMATION:

Friday, March 25, 2011 at 7pm, followed by a panel discussion
Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT

Friday, March 25, 2011 at 7pm
Bowers Auditorium, Sage Hall, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT

Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 1pm
Peabody Museum, 170 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT

Saturday, March 26, 2011 at 5:30pm
Burke Auditorium, Kroon Hall, 195 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT

About the Filmmakers

Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School, the Department of Religious Studies, and the Center for Bioethics. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology.

Brian Thomas Swimme is a professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon in 1978 for work in gravitational dynamics. He brings the context of story to our understanding of the 13.7 billion year trajectory of cosmogenesis. Such a story, he feels, will assist in the emergence of a flourishing Earth community.


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Genre: Documentary
Year: 2011
Running Time: 60 Minutes

Website: www.journeyoftheuniverse.org

Director: David Kennard
Producer: Patsy Northcutt
Co-Producer: Catherine Lynn Butler
Editor: Patsy Northcutt
Director of Photography: Ian Salvage
Executive Producer: Mary Evelyn Tucker



Press


Yale Daily News (4/11/2012)

Environmental film festival reopens, with a broad view

 

New Haven Register (4/8/2012)

Chimps, whales, Mother Earth star in Yale’s environmental film fest

 

Huffington Post (4/8/2011)

YERT Blockbuster: Your Environmental Road Trip Film Wins EFFY 2011 Audience Award: Interview With Filmmakers

 

Yale Daily News (4/5/2011)

Walsh: A Wider Lens

 

SustainableFocus.org (4/3/2011)

A Weekend at the Environmental Film Festival at Yale

 

Yale Daily News (4/1/2011)

The environment and the arts meet, collide & promote social action

 

The Yale Herald (4/1/2011)

Yale’s Environmental Film Festival

 

Interview on FoxCT morning news (3/28/2011)

 

The New Haven Register (3/27/2011)

Reel eco-friendly: EFFY’s slate of award-winning films opens Monday

 

Segment on Fox 61 Morning News

 

Feature story in the New Haven Register

 

Item in the San Francisco Chronicle

 

Profile in Variety

 

Feature story in Yale Daily News

 

Feature story in New Haven Advocate

 

Feature story in the Hartford Courant

 

Feature story in the Yale Bulletin


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WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

 

"There’s Cannes, Tribeca and Sundance. But only New Haven has EFFY." - New Haven Register

 

“What’s unique about this film festival is that it’s run through a university so it’s not just a film festival that’s for commerce. It’s more about an academic issue, too, so I can see why there’s a focus on issues like sustainability.” - Andrew Grace, director of Eating Alabama

 

"It’s not that I’m anti-environment, just anti-environmental film.... [EFFY] found at least one convert — mission accomplished." - Yale Daily News

 

"You are Waste Land's official favorite festival!!" - Academy Award nominated director, Lucy Walker (Waste Land, The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom)

 

“This has been one of the best festivals I have attended, for its organization, for its execution of its theme, for its welcoming atmosphere for filmmakers, and for the way it expanded on its films with worthwhile panels and Q&A.” - Michael Parfit, Co-Director of Saving Luna

 

“A roster of movies that would put many longtime festivals to shame.” - New Haven Register


Venues



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Click here for the New Haven bus schedule or click here for the Yale shuttle schedule.


Donate


EFFY was created by students and is run by students, all of whom volunteer their time to make it happen. We rely on financial and in-kind donations to cover expenses and we need your support.

Help us ensure that EFFY continues next year and beyond, and that screenings continue to be free to the community. We appreciate any support you can offer!

To donate to EFFY, please use this Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies form.


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Awards


 

 

The 2012 Grand Jury Prizes were selected by a panel of jurors whose information is to the right.

 

2012 EFFY Award Winners


Grand Jury Prize, Feature:
The Island President, a film about the world’s lowest-lying island nation threatened by rising sea levels.

Grand Jury Prize, Short:
663114, an animated film about the reemergence of a 66-year-old cicada moments before an earthquake and tsunami.

Special Jury Prize:
Bestiaire, a feature films that explores the boundaries between nature and humanity.

EFFY Audience Award:
The Whale, a documentary about an orca that forms a bond with people.

 

Click here to see past years' winners.


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The 2013 EFFY Jury

 

Scott Rumage

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, IT Support Technician

Scott Rumage became fixated with films when his grandmother took him to see Gigi in 1982. After getting fed up with his parents' small tv & horrible sound, he re-wired their house for a laserdisc player and surround sound in 1989. His large collection of laserdiscs, VHS tapes, DVDs, HD-DVDs, & Blurays (he totally skipped betamax) is arranged by his librarian husband, Allen Townsend, in Library of Congress Format, and is managed by their miniature piebald daschund, Dashelle. When he isn't watching movies, he can be found pickling, canning, knitting, scuba diving, sous viding, gardening, composting, or completely geeking out.

 

David Krause

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and the School of Public Health, Master's Student

David Krause is a joint degree student between the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the School of Public Health. His professional and academic work focuses on the relationship between the natural environment and human health. David has long had an interest in environmental films' ability to educate and inspire.

 

Zachary Obinna-Enumah

Amistad High School, New Haven

Zachary Obinna-Enumah teaches science at Amistad High School in New Haven, CT. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in African Studies from Yale University. Zachary co-produced and edited the film, "Spirits, Camels, and Poetry," a film that explores one Tanzanian man's maternal history as rooted in poetry and which premiered at the Zanzibar Film Festival in 2010. He is currently working on the FLIPPED classroom model to bring more videos and technology into his high school science classrooms.

 

Samara Brock

Yale Sustainable Food Project, Research Fellow

Samara has worked in sustainable food systems for over 15 years with a variety of food-focused NGOs locally and internationally (largely in Cuba and Argentina), as a food systems planner at the the City of Vancouver, and as a foundation program officer funding food, fisheries and climate change issues. She is currently a research fellow at the Yale Sustainable Food Project. She has also dabbled in film-making and co-created Planners for Tomorrow a stop animation film featuring a robot that circled the globe finding innovative solutions to pressing urban challenges, which was featured at the World Planners Congress and the UN's World Urban Forum.

 

Omar Malik

School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Master's Student

Omar is a second-year master’s student at the Yale School of Forestry, where he studies global environmental governance. He also pursues environmental media production. He thinks EFFY is a great way to engage the public with modern issues of science and policy.

 

Click here to see the jury panel from last year's festival.


Sustainability


Not only are we interested in conveying important environmental issues to audiences via the medium of film, but we are dedicated to ensuring that our festival operations are environmentally sustainable and low-impact.  We adhere to the Yale Office of Sustainability’s event guidelines, as well as keep track of sustainability efforts to set ever increasing goals for the following year’s festival. 

The films shown at EFFY are meant to inspire and encourage action. This page will soon be updated with resources to take action that address environmental issues seen in this year's films. Stay tuned...


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Films & Events


All films are free and open to the public.


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About Us


The Environmental Film Festival at Yale (EFFY) has become the premier student-run festival for environmental films. The 5th annual EFFY showcases the arts through incisive, cutting edge films that raise awareness of environmental and related social issues. We aim to facilitate meaningful discourse and spark action and innovation throughout the Yale community and beyond.

All films and events are free and open to the public.

The EFFY Team

 

Kendall Barbery

Elizabeth Babalola

Co-Director. Elizabeth is a second-year Master of Environmental Management student at Yale F&ES from Nigeria who is passionate about young people and increasing their involvement in the process of change via environmental education. Thus far, she has worked as an environmental education consultant and an entrepreneur. She loves working with kids, outdoors planting street trees or in the classroom talking about ecology or reproductive and sexual heath and is currently interested in the relationship that Nigerian students have with their environment. Elizabeth loves to salsa and is excited to about working on the 6th EFFY and the 2nd Young Filmmakers and Photographer’s contest.

 

 

Rebeka Ryvola

Rebeka Ryvola

Co-Director. Rebeka was born in what was once Bohemia and lived in an Austrian refugee camp with her parents, brother, and pet rabbit before growing up in Beautiful British Columbia, Canada. Her goal in life is to learn forever and make the world a happier place. She’s happiest when she’s outside/around friends and family. At Yale, she loves being a part of the Women in Science at Yale mentorship program, gardening with grade 2 farmers at the Yale Farm, working for the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, co-leading the Environmental Justice student interest group (with two amazing people named Lexi and Anandi), and doing as many other things as possible. Her master’s at Yale F&ES is focused on climate change adaptation, gender equality, communications, and disaster risk reduction.

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Richard Miron

Lexi Tuddenham

Co-Director. Lexi is a second-year Masters student at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. After studying biology as an undergraduate, she was inspired by her professional experiences in international development, environmental education, and advocacy to focus on community management of resources, environmental justice, and environmental communication at Yale F&ES. She has lived and worked in China, Nepal, and Colorado, where most recently, she was on the screening committee for the Telluride Mountainfilm Festival. She loves the American West, rivers and mountains, climbing, floppy-eared dogs, and good stories.

 

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Paul Thomson

Taylor Rees

Director of Programming. Taylor is our Director of Programming for EFFY 2014. She is currently a Master's candidate at Yale F&ES, focusing on environmental communication and media, natural resource anthropology, and sustainability issues within the outdoor industry. She is the co-director of WESTIES, a student group involved with conservation issues in the intermountain American West, and currently leading a climate change multimedia journalism project at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Her background in media campaigns and film production developed overtime as she has woven these mediums into her environmental research in Greenland, Alaska, the desert Southwest, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Taylor graduated from the Pennsylvania State University with a B.S. in Biology and a focus in climate change ecology and communication.

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Tse Yang Lim

Director of Operations Tse Yang is a Master of Environmental Management student at Yale F&ES, where he works on how to improve decision-making and policy learning. He has an obsession with large-scale interactions and linkages across disciplines and sectors. He has previously worked at the Marine Conservation Institute in Washington, DC; the Center for Governance and Sustainability in Boston; and the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations. Tse Yang hails from Singapore, and graduated from Yale with a B.S. in Biology.

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Phil Santiago

Andrej Pavlovic

Andrej is a first year MEM student at Yale F&ES focusing on the intersection between energy and finance. In addition to EFFY, Andrej is working with the Yale Center for Business and the Environment and the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute. Prior to Yale, Andrej spent 4 years working in solar energy in San Francisco, California. He graduated from UCLA in 2009 and is an avid skier, snowboarder and outdoor enthusiast.

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Emily Schosid

Shane Feyers

Design and Media. Shane is a Master of Environmental Management Student at Yale F&ES. His interests of environmental philosophy and social ecology led him to investigate the political and social dimensions of conservation planning and design. Holding a BSc. in Natural Resources from the University of Connecticut, he earned a wildlife Track & Sign field certification in South Africa and spent a semester abroad studying sustainability science in Western Australia. Engaged in entrepreneurial activities and advocacy, he spends his free time recreating in green (and blue) spaces around the East Coast.


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The EFFY Team

  • Elizabeth Babalola (Co-Director)
  • Rebeka Ryvola (Co-Director)
  • Lexi Tuddenham (Co-Director)
  • Taylor Rees (Director of Programming)
  • Tse Yang Lim (Director of Operations)
  • Andrej Pavlovic (Director of Finance)
  • Shane Feyers (Design and Media)


Advisory Board


Eric Desatnik,
Founder


Tamar Cooper,
Co-Founder


Chandra Simon,
Senior Advisor, Former Executive Director


Mary Fischer,
Advisor


Gordon Geballe,
Associate Dean of Alumni and External Affairs, Lecturer in Urban Ecology, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

Home


ATTENTION! WE HAVE A NEW WEBSITE! PLEASE SEE HERE FOR INFO ON EFFY 2014.

ATTENTION! WE HAVE A NEW WEBSITE! PLEASE SEE HERE FOR INFO ON EFFY 2014.


Announcing the Winners of EFFY 2013!

EFFY is thrilled to announce the winners of our 2013 festival. Click here!


Announcing the Winners of EFFY 2012


Best Feature: The Island President
Best Short: 663114
Special Jury Prize: Bestiaire
Audience Award: The Whale
Click here to read more.


 

EFFY 2011 Winners

Read the press relesase to find out which films took home the top awards in last year's festival. Click here.


Watch

A conversation with Dan Rather: Journalism, Justice and the Environment -- from EFFY 2010.

A conversation with Van Jones at EFFY 2010:



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ATTENTION! WE HAVE A NEW WEBSITE! PLEASE SEE HERE FOR INFO ON EFFY 2014.


ENTER THE YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHERS CONTEST HERE


CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT TO EFFY 2014


All Events Are Free and Open to the Public


Presented by:Presented by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies


Hospitality Sponsor: The Study At Yale


Sponsor: Films At The Whitney


 

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