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On the Environment

Friday, October 08, 2010
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Updates from Tianjin: Progress on the GreenGen IGCC project

By testpersona

Posted by Angel Hsu (Original posting can be found at chinafaqs.org) Having the intercessional UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) meeting in China this week – the last stop before ministers and heads of state meet in Cancun for the sixteenth Conference of Parties (COP-16) – provides a timely opportunity for participants to witness firsthand elements of China’s clean energy and climate policies in action. As China has become a world leader in developing and deploying key technologies needed to capture and sequester carbon, the U.S. Climate Action Network (USCAN) and the Clean Air Task Force organized a site visit to GreenGen – China’s first commercial-scale Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant located in Tianjin, approximately an hour’s drive from the Meijiang Convention Center, where negotiations have been underway. GreenGen – a $1 billion project led by China Huaneng – represents a joint venture between seven other Chinese enterprises and has the support of the Chinese government, including the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology. U.S.-based Peabody Energy also joined the project in 2007 as the only foreign investor. While the Chinese refer to GreenGen as a “research demonstration project,” visiting the site a mere year away from completion of the project’s first phase, left our group with little doubt that this project means business. The first phase of the IGCC plant will produce a full-sized plant’s 250 MW of power, heat, and synthetic gas (syngas). Li Liangshi, the Deputy Chief Engineer of China Huaneng in Tianjin, said construction of the plant began in 2009 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2011. GreenGen demonstrates multiple IGCC technologies that can hopefully be scaled to simultaneously address several environmental challenges – and not just climate change and energy security. To address criteria air pollutant abatement, GreenGen features pre-combustion technology that will strip pollutants such as SO2 and particulates from the coal syngas, according to Deborah Seligsohn, Principal Advisor to WRI’s Climate and Energy Program. GreenGen’s second phase will implement fuel cell power generation and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology for nearly zero-emission power generation. The third phase of the project is planned for completion by 2016, when the plant would produce a total of 650 MW and 3,500 tons of syngas per day. The presentations by Chinese climate and energy experts here in Tianjin have emphasized the critical nature of technologies like IGCC and CCS for China to achieve its energy and carbon intensity reduction targets, particularly as China will continue to rely on coal for a large portion of energy production. In a presentation on Oct. 5, Professor Jiang Kejun of China’s Energy Research Institute emphasized how crucial CCS is for China to make deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions. The emission models for China Prof. Jiang and ERI have been working on assume wide-scale deployment of CCS post 2030. Returning to the context of the negotiations in Tianjin, a big piece of the discussion has surrounded technology transfer from industrialized countries to developing countries, to both mitigate and adapt to climate change. However, China shows the capacity to promote two-way exchange in areas like IGCC and CCS. Huaneng’s Mr. Li said that all of the technologies used for the first-phase GreenGen IGCC are manufactured domestically by Chinese companies, with the exception of the Siemens gas turbine . While China has growing capture experience, it is just beginning to try to actually inject CO2, with the first such injection likely to begin at a Shenhua Coal Liquefaction Company project in Inner Mongolia in the next few months. This latter project has received technical support from a number of US technical organizations, many of which are in the newly announced US-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). Against the smoggy skyline, I could not help but be impressed by the sheer scale and speed with which GreenGen has emerged within the past year. Seligsohn, who had first visited the site a year ago on a study tour of Chinese CCS sites for American experts, remarked that last year on their visit, the site was nothing more than foundation. Although Mr. Li admitted GreenGen’s price tag was not cheap, he said that if successful, Huaneng plans to roll out many more similar IGCC-CCS plants. And with China continuing to build about 30 power plants a year, according to Jiang, these technologies could have a significant impact on China’s air quality and greenhouse gas emissions. ChinaFAQs Expert Angel Hsu is a doctoral student at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Her research focuses on Chinese environmental performance measurement, governance, and policy.

Posted in: Energy & Climate
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Politics, special interests, White House blundering led to death of climate bill
Climate talks struggle as China, U.S. face off

Judge Rules Health Law is Constitutional

IMF Chief's warning of currency war 'real threat'

Hungarian chemical sludge spill reaches Danube

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Monday, October 04, 2010
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Tales from Tianjin

By testpersona

Guest post by Angel Hsu, doctoral student at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. I’m blogging live from the Tianjin intersessional meetings of the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the last stop on the way to the big Conference of Parties (COP-16) meeting in Cancun, Mexico this November. The mere fact that China is hosting this meeting is significant for several reasons. This is the first time China is playing host to the UNFCCC climate negotiations, signaling its commitment to the UNFCCC process and the issue of climate change itself. As the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitter, China continues to demonstrate recognition of its role in the global problem of climate change, hosting the intercessional meetings during its national day holiday – a fitting time for China to demonstrate its nationalism and rising leadership in the climate debates. For many, as NRDC’s Jake Schmidt argues, attending the talks in Tianjin will allow first-hand experience of China’s clean-energy revolution and actions on climate change. The main charge of delegates here in Tianjin is to narrow down the set of options available on the table. As Jennifer Morgan, who heads the Climate Change and Energy Program at the World Resources Institute, said in a recent press conference, a key aim of this task is for delegates to “[reconnect] what leaders did and said in Copenhagen and to formalise that in the UNFCCC into a set of decisions, combined with a clear pathway in the form of a legal document.” Parties will produce “draft decisions” on issues such as adaptation, financing, REDD plus, accounting and verification, mitigation pledges, and technology transfer so that when heads of state meet in Cancun, they’ll be able to quickly move to identify points of common ground on these issues to carry enough momentum into South Africa for COP-17. What can’t be ignored this week in Tianjin is the current state of China-US relations. Recent headlines such as the complaint filed by the US steelworkers union against Chinese clean-energy subsidies and a bill currently being discussed in Congress that would penalise China for keeping its currency artificially low are evidence of the current tenuousness of Sino-American relations. It remains to be seen this week whether such a political backdrop will cloud the climate discussions in Tianjin between the two countries, particularly on issues such as financing, technology transfer and the Measurable, Reportable, and Verifiable (MRV) aspects of actions from developing countries and of commitments and support from developed countries. As you’ll remember from the COP-15 discussions in Copenhagen the United States came in demanding international verification of China’s domestic climate actions, a move that riled and split the Chinese delegation, although China in the end agreed to “international consultation and analysis”. However, according to Kenneth Lieberthal, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, this agreement to “international consultation and analysis” was only made reluctantly and caused considerable dissension within the Chinese delegation, as it went beyond what the Chinese representatives had in their talking points coming into Copenhagen. Lieberthal contends that the Chinese were unhappy in particular about bringing in the MRV piece into a formal COP-approved process; instead, the Chinese are looking only to bring in elements from Copenhagen that prove useful and basing negotiations in the two-track process of the Kyoto Protocol and the Bali Action Plan. I’ll be following the MRV issue closely over the next few days, as part of my dissertation research and the reason why I’m in Tianjin as an observer. To make matters worse, the United States also missed an opportunity to engage in high-level climate and energy discussions with the high-level Chinese officials, including NDRC Vice Minister Xie Zhenhua, who – as host of the negotiations – is undoubtedly present and available. While the US delegation is in the perfectly capable hands of Jonathan Pershing, deputy special envoy for climate change, the presence of his boss, Todd Stern, would have given tremendous mian zi (literally, “face;” or figuratively, “dignity or respect”) to the Chinese hosts. The talks would have been prime opportunity for the two climate behemoths to repair some of the ground lost over the last year. Despite the daunting challenges always on the plate at these UNFCCC meetings, I hope that delegates here heed the charge of executive secretary Cristiana Figueres during this morning’s welcome plenary session – “Now is the time to act”, else we threaten to forfeit the credibility of multilateralism in solving the global climate change challenge. More to come … follow me on Twitter at @ecoangelhsu for real-time updates from the Tianjin Meijiang Convention Center.

Posted in: Energy & Climate
Friday, October 01, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Graham's plan for clean energy bill could drain RES support
California licenses 2 new power plants

China moving heaven and earth to bring water to Beijing

Emanuel's Departure is set; replacement is longtime aide

US issues new rules on drilling

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Monday, September 27, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Developing Nations to Get Clean Burning Stoves
UN asks for action on nature loss, citing poverty

RES bill stands alone or dies, sponsors vow

White House meeting yields environmental justice pledges

Well is sealed, tale isn't over

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Tuesday, August 17, 2010
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U.S. businesses lack data to meet sustainability goals

By testpersona

According to the report “Business Cleaning Sustainability Study,” conducted on behalf of Procter & Gamble Professional, businesses lack, or have a perceived lack of, credible data to meet sustainability goals. This is a longstanding problem, and one that the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy identified some time ago. For instance, in Professor Esty’s piece published by Oxford University Press in 2002, he states: “The data and analyses needed – by governments, companies, and individuals – for thoughtful and systematic action to minimize pollution harms and to optimize the use of natural resources are often unavailable or seem to costly to obtain. As a result, choices are made on the basis of generalized observations and best guesses, or worse yet, rhetoric and emotion. We stand, however, on the verge of an opportunity to transform our approach to pollution control and natural resource management through deployment of digital technologies in support of a more careful, quantitative, empirically grounded, and systematic environmentalism.” That old problems still linger means we need to redouble our efforts to advance sustainability measurements in all sectors of society, but especially in the corporate world. Along those lines, please stay tuned for Professor Esty’s new book, “Green to Gold Playbook: A Guide to Implementing Sustainable Business Practices,” co-authored with P.J. Simmons, which will be on shelves this spring.

Posted in: Innovation & Environment
Monday, July 26, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Soul searching for enviro groups -- and desperate RES push -- in wake of Senate defeat
Senate to skip carbon caps, renewable energy standards – report

Oil giants pledge $1B for 'rapid response' on spills

U.S. green revolution knocks, but few answer in South Bronx

China surpasses U.S. as largest power consumer, IEA says

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Tuesday, June 29, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Few improvements to oil spill cleanup since Exxon Valdez
Before rig explosion, scant difference between BP, other drillers on safety

Methane in Gulf "astonishingly high"

First Asian carp found in waterway near Great Lakes

Nature’s Path: A Quirkily Beautiful Shift Towards Sustainable Branding

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Wednesday, June 23, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Greening Our Capital Cities
A lucky few manage to profit from disaster
 
Carbon dioxide choking marine ecosystems – study

Members overseeing Gulf spill had millions in oil investments

Will bacterial plague follow crude along Gulf Coast?

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Wednesday, June 16, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

Senate Dems want BP to set aside $20B for damages
Relief wells planned with little oversight
 
U.S. continues to lag in solar adoption

Solar Power Has Its Day

EPA withdraws rule excluding certain fuels from RCRA regulations

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Monday, June 14, 2010
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2010 Green World Cup

By testpersona

See how countries would fare in the 2010 Green World Cup

Posted in: Environmental Performance Measurement
Tuesday, June 08, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

With cap in place, BP begins capturing crude
BP puts containment cap on gushing Gulf well pipe
 
Power companies lie back as push begins for Senate bill

Oil begins hitting Alabama's Dauphin Island

Key Countries Partner to Reduce Deforestation Emissions

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Tuesday, June 01, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

U.S. to halt 33 exploration rigs in deepwater review
Ruptured BP well tops Valdez as worst U.S. spill
 
The Deepwater Oil Release Impact on Marine Life

BP reduces estimate of how much oil it is capturing

Most large companies plan to increase spending on climate

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Tuesday, May 25, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

National Academy of Sciences urges swift U.S. action to curb emissions Obama to set up oil spill panel Oil spill could be among worst ever House Republicans offer bill to keep climate out of NEPA reviews Arctic team reports unusual conditions near Pole

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Friday, May 07, 2010
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Taking Measure

By testpersona

The big question: How much CO2 can the Earth hold?
'Green city' builders facing technological, financial hurdles

Troubled Senate emissions bill to undergo EPA analysis

Oil spill in Gulf of Mexico ‘could be worse than Exxon Valdez disaster’

Russia and Norway strike Arctic sea border deal

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