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Citizen Behavior

October 09 2013

Climate Change in the San Franciscan Mind

Climate Change in the San Franciscan Mind

Highlights:

  • The overwhelming majority of San Franciscans (87%) believes global warming is happening, while only 5% believe it is not happening.
  • Two in three (67%) believe that if global warming is happening, it is mostly due to human activities. Moreover, seven in ten (69%) understand there is widespread agreement among scientists that climate change is happening.
  • Of those San Franciscans who believe global warming is happening, most expect a myriad of negative effects over the next 50 years. Nine in ten anticipate more droughts and water shortages (91%), heat waves (89%), or declining numbers of fish and native wildlife (89%). Two in three (66%) expect that parts of the city will have to be abandoned in the next 50 years due to sea level rise.
  • Majorities also say that more should be done about global warming at all levels of government—from Congress (69%) and President Obama (63%), to California state legislators (66%) and Governor Brown (62%), to local government officials (63%). However, even larger numbers of San Franciscans believe that citizens themselves (77%) and corporations and industry (75%) should be doing more to address climate change.
  • Many San Franciscans say that a transition to cleaner energy would be good for the local economy, with six in ten (58%) saying that switching from fossil fuels to clean energy sources would increase local economic growth and the number of jobs.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Policy Support Risk Perceptions
October 02 2013

Anthony Leiserowitz opens the Architectural League of NY’s “5000 Pound Life” event

Find out how Americans think about and value climate change in the 21st century.

 

 

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Risk Perceptions Six Americas Values & Religion
October 02 2013

Climate Change in the American Mind: Focus on California, Colorado, Ohio and Texas

Climate Change in the American Mind: Focus on California, Colorado, Ohio and Texas

Highlights:

Our recent statewide surveys of Californians, Coloradans, Ohioans, and Texans find that majorities in each state say global warming is happening. This belief is most widespread in California (79%), but seven in ten in Colorado, Ohio, and Texas agree as well (70% in each).

There are also important differences between the states, however. For example:

  • Over half of Californians say that, if global warming is happening, it is caused mostly by human activities (58%). By contrast, only 44% of Texans say global warming is caused mostly by human activities, and 31% say it is caused mostly by natural changes in the environment.
  • Half or more of Californians (55%) and Texans (52%) say they have personally experienced the effects of global warming. Fewer in Colorado (48%) and Ohio (45%) say that they have.
  • A majority of Californians (55%) understands that most scientists think global warming is happening. In the other three states surveyed, however, people are more likely to say that scientists disagree about whether or not global warming is happening.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Policy Support Risk Perceptions Vulnerability & Resilience
September 23 2013

Climate Change in the Texan Mind

Climate Change in the Texan Mind

Highlights:

  • Most Texans (70%) believe global warming is happening. Relatively few (14%) believe it is not.
  • Fewer than half (44%) believe that if global warming is happening, it is caused mostly by human activities. Three in ten (31%) believe it is caused mostly by natural changes in the environment.
  • About half of Texans (52%) say they have personally experienced the effects of global warming.
  • Among Texans who believe global warming is happening, large majorities expect to see a myriad of negative effects over the next 50 years. Nearly all anticipate more heat waves (95%) and increased drought and water shortages (92%) in Texas due to global warming. More than eight in ten believe Texas will experience worse storms, hurricanes, or tornadoes (87%), declining numbers of fish and native wildlife (86%), and increased allergies, asthma, infectious diseases, or other health problems (85%) due to global warming.
  • More than half of Texans say that more should be done about global warming at all levels of government—from Congress (62%) and President Obama (57%), to Governor Perry (59%) and Texas’s state legislature (56%), to local government officials (60%).
  • Even larger numbers of Texans believe that citizens themselves (69%) and corporations and industry (68%) should be doing more to address climate change.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Policy Support Risk Perceptions Trust
September 18 2013

Climate Change in the Ohioan Mind

Climate Change in the Ohioan Mind

Highlights:

  • Most people in Ohio (70%) believe global warming is happening, while only 16% believe it is not. 
  • Half (49%) believe that if global warming is happening, it is mostly due to human activities.
  • Of those who believe global warming is happening, large majorities say that it is already having an influence on the severity of heat waves (90%), droughts (88%), and flooding of rivers or lakes (87%) in Ohio.
  • Among those who believe climate change is happening, large majorities say that over the next 50 years, climate change will cause more heat waves (89%), worse storms (84%), declining numbers of fish and native wildlife (82%), droughts and water shortages (82%), increased allergies, asthma, infectious diseases, or other health problems (83%), and more power outages (78%) in the state.
  • Solid majorities of Ohioans support government action at all levels of government: Congress (59%), President Obama (54%), Ohio’s state legislature (56%), Governor Kasich (54%), and local government officials (53%).
  • Even more say that corporations and industry (69%) and citizens themselves (65%) should be doing more to address climate change.
  • Ohioans still see global warming as a relatively distant threat. While 70% believe global warming will harm future generations of people and plant and animal species, only 35% believe it will harm them personally.

Please note:  the numbers cited above have been corrected from the original press release distributed Wednesday, September 18th and have been confirmed.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Policy Support Risk Perceptions
September 10 2013

Climate Change in the Californian Mind

Climate Change in the Californian Mind

Highlights:

  • Most Californians (79%) believe global warming is happening, while only 11% believe it is not.  
  • Over half (58%) believe that if global warming is happening, it is mostly due to human activities.
  • A majority (55%) also believes that most scientists think global warming is happening.

Of those who believe global warming is happening, large majorities say that:

  • Global warming is already having an influence on the severity of heat waves (96%), wildfires (91%), and droughts (90%) in California.
  • Over the next 50 years, climate change will cause more heat waves (93%), droughts and water shortages (92%), declining numbers of fish and native wildlife (91%), increased allergies, asthma, infectious diseases, or other health problems (86%), and more power outages (84%) in the state.

The study also found that Californians support more climate action:

  • Six in ten want more action by Governor Brown, the state legislature, and local government officials.
  • Even more say corporations and industry (73%) and citizens themselves (70%) should be doing more to address the issue.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Energy Use / Conservation Knowledge / Climate Literacy Policy Support Risk Perceptions Trust
September 04 2013

Climate Change in the Coloradan Mind

Climate Change in the Coloradan Mind

Highlights:

  • Most Coloradans (70%) believe global warming is happening. Relatively few—only 19%— believe it is not.
  • Nearly half (48%) believe global warming is caused mostly by human activities.
  • Coloradans think global warming is important and are worried about it. Three in four (73%) say the issue of global warming is very or somewhat important to them personally. And six in ten (59%) are at least somewhat worried about it.
  • Among those who believe global warming is happening, 70% believe it is currently contributing to increased droughts and decreased snowpack, and 66% believe it is exacerbating wildfires.
  • About half of Coloradans (48%) say they have personally experienced global warming’s effects.
  • More than half of Coloradans say that more should be done about global warming at all levels of government—from President Obama and Congress, to Governor Hickenlooper and the state legislature, to local government officials. However, even larger numbers of Coloradans believe that corporations and industry (67%) and citizens themselves (66%) should be doing more to address climate change.
  • Half of Coloradans (52%) say that switching from fossil fuels to clean energy sources would increase economic growth and the number of jobs

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Energy Use / Conservation Knowledge / Climate Literacy Policy Support Risk Perceptions Trust
August 20 2013

How Americans Communicate About Global Warming April 2013

How Americans Communicate About Global Warming April 2013

Highlights:

One in four Americans (24%) would support an organizaton that engaged in non-violent civil disobedience against corporate or government activities that make global warming worse.

One in eight (13%) say they would be willing to personally engage in non-violent civil disobedience for the same reason.

In the past year, Americans were more likely to discuss global warming with family and friends than to communicate about it using social media (33% versus 7%).  

Americans are most likely to identify their own friends and family, such as a significant other (27%), son or daughter (21%), or close friend (17%), as the people who could motivate them to take action to reduce global warming.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Media Risk Communication Six Americas
June 19 2013

Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming April 2013

Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming April 2013

Highlights

Consumer Behavior:

  • Half of all Americans at least occasionally consider environmental impacts when deciding whether or not to buy a product.
  • At least four in ten Americans say they “often” or “occasionally” bought food grown or produced locally (69%) or organic food (42%) in the past 12 months, while eight in ten intend to buy locally grown or produced food and six in ten intend to buy organic food in the next 12 months.
  • Asked if, the next time they make a purchase, they intend to buy specific energy-efficient items, majorities of Americans say they will buy an energy-efficient kitchen appliance (75%), home water heater (71%), home air conditioner (68%), or home furnace (67%). Six in ten say the next time they purchase a car, it will average 30 miles or more per gallon (61%).
  • Three in ten Americans (28%) say that, in the past 12 months, they have rewarded companies taking steps to reduce global warming by buying their products. About one in five (21%) also say that in the past 12 months they have punished companies opposing steps to reduce global warming by not purchasing their products.
  • In the past 12 months, one in four Americans (26%) say they discussed what they see as a company’s irresponsible environmental behavior with friends or family. One in ten has spread information about offending companies via the Internet (10%).

Civic Behavior:

  • Nearly four out of ten Americans (38%) say that they would be willing to join a campaign to convince elected officials to do “the right thing” about global warming.
  • Over the past 12 months, five to ten percent of Americans have “often” or “occasionally” signed a petition about global warming (10%); shared information about global warming on Facebook or Twitter (7%); donated money to an organization working on global warming (7%); donated money to a political candidate because they share your views on global warming (6%); posted a comment online in response to a news story or blog about global warming (6%); written letters, emailed, or phoned a newspaper about global warming (5%); or volunteered time to elect a political candidate because they share your views on global warming (5%).

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Topics: Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Energy Use / Conservation Six Americas
June 11 2013

Anthony Leiserowitz presents Climate Change and the American Mind at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

 

 

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Outreach Projects Risk Perceptions Six Americas
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