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Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming November 2013

Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming November 2013

Highlights:

* Three in ten (29%) have joined or would join a campaign to convince elected officials to take action to reduce global warming.

* Nearly four in ten (36%) have joined or would join a campaign to convince elected officials to pass laws increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy as a way to reduce America's dependence on fossil fuels.

* About half of Americans (53%) say they would sign a petition about global warming if asked by a person they "like and respect."

* About four in ten say that, if asked, they would sign a pledge to vote only for political candidates that share their views on global warming (39%).

* One in four Americans would support an organization engaging in non-violent civil disobedience against corporate or government activities that make global warming worse (24%) and one in six (17%) say they would personally engage in such actiivities.

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Public Support for Climate and Energy Policies in November 2013

Public Support for Climate and Energy Policies in November 2013

Highlights:

Large majorities of Americans support national action on global warming:

• Most Americans (83%) say the U.S. should make an effort to reduce global warming, even if it has economic costs.

• Majorities of Americans say that corporations and industry (65%), citizens themselves (61%), and the U.S. Congress (52%) should be doing more to address global warming.

• A majority of Americans (71%) say global warming should be a priority for the president and Congress.
 

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Anthony Leiserowitz on the 2014 State of the Union Address

America's Climate Choice

President Obama’s 5th State of the Union Address was a stirring call to reignite the American Dream – a dream that feels increasingly out of reach for far too many Americans.

He vowed to take assertive presidential action this year – with Congress where possible, but without Congress when it refuses to act. This includes perhaps his most important legacy – making serious and substantial progress to reduce the threat of global warming and prepare the nation for the impacts already beginning to hit home. Future generations will look back on this president and on this time as a critical moment in the history of the world – did we choose to address this real and present danger or did we choose to ignore or deny the problem until it festered beyond repair? The president said, “…the debate is settled. Climate change is a fact.” But some members of Congress continue to dispute the conclusions of 97% of climate scientists who, based upon the evidence, are convinced that human-caused global warming is happening.
 

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Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind in November 2013

Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind in November 2013

Highlights:

  • Compared to the record-setting extreme weather disaster years of 2011 and 2012, the year 2013 in the United States was relatively calm, with no land-falling hurricanes, fewer tornadoes, and drought relief in the Great Plains. In turn, fewer Americans say they experienced an extreme weather event last year. People in the Northeast, Midwest, and South, however, were more likely to report experiencing extreme cold or a snowstorm in 2013 than they did in 2012.
  • Over half of Americans (56%) say “global warming is affecting weather in the United States.”
  • A large majority of Americans say their state and local government should make it a priority to protect public water supplies (78%), transportation/roads/bridges (73%), people’s health (72%), the electricity system (71%), agriculture (70%), and public sewer systems (69%) from extreme weather over the next 10 years.

 

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Climate Change in the American Mind: Americans’ Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes in November 2013

Climate Change in the American Mind: Americans’ Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes in November 2013

The most recent national Climate Change in the American Mind survey found that 1 in 4 Americans think that global warming is not happening, and half say they are "worried" about it. 

Other highlights include:

  • There has been an increase in the proportion of Americans who believe global warming is not happening (23%, up 7 percentage points since April 2013). But about two in three Americans (63%) believe global warming is happening, a number that has been consistent since spring 2013.
  • The proportion of Americans who say they “don’t know” whether or not global warming is happening has dropped 6 points – from 20% to 14% – since spring of 2013.
  • About half of Americans (51%) say they are “somewhat” (38%) or “very worried” (15%) about global warming.
  • Fewer than half of Americans (38%) believe they personally will be harmed a “moderate amount” or a “great deal” by global warming.
  • By contrast, majorities believe that global warming will harm future generations of people (65%) and plant and animal species (65%).
  • About four in 10 say they feel “helpless” (43%), “disgusted” (42%), or “sad” (40%) when thinking about global warming.
  • By contrast, four in ten (42%), say they feel “hopeful” about the subject.
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Anthony Leiserowitz on MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry Show

On Saturday, January 11th, 2013, YPCCC Director Anthony Leiserowitz spent the morning discussing, among other things, the parallels between climate change and the smoking debate on MSNBC's Melissa Harris-Perry Show.  Watch the conversation below.

Segment 1:

 
Segment 2:
 

 

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