Christopher Monckton gets tagged

Christopher Monckton, the well-known British climate change denier, was spotted near the Yale booth around lunchtime today.  When I saw him, he was the focus of a gleeful swarm of youth activists.  While Monckton engaged in heated debate with a handful of energetic young people, a couple of daring souls found a different way to get the last word.  Monckton walked away sporting stickers that read “I love climate change” and “350 ppm” on his back.

Christopher Monckton gets tagged

Lord Monckton gets tagged

Follow up on 12/12: Read more about Lord Monckton’s confrontation with youth activists on The Lede blog at the New York Times…

By Angel Hsu and Christopher Kieran
Another post by ‘Team China.’ These posts are originally being featured on Green Leap Forward and also cross-posted on Climateprogress.org and the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy’s blog.
While the drama surrounding the Guardian’s leak of a “secret” Danish negotiating text seems to be fizzling down (see our previous post), this was most likely due in some part to a small island nation now famous here in Copenhagen. Yes, you guessed it – Tuvalu, a tiny Polynesian island occupying just 10 square miles of the Pacific Ocean.
During the morning plenary session today, however, the Tuvaluans were not as diminutive as the size of their small island state would suggest. After Tuvalou proposed the creation of a contact group for a ‘Copenhagen Protocol’ (full text of draft here), China’s apparent negative reactions sent the Tuvaluans to motion for a suspension of the talks. The proposed ‘Copenhagen Protocol’ would parallel the current negotiations regarding the Kyoto Protocol (KP). It would be stricter than Kyoto, and legally bind parties to keep global atmospheric CO2 concentrations to 350 parts per million and global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees.

Climate Change Impacts to Coral Reefs

Part of my interest in attending the 15th COP is to understand how climate change impacts to the oceans are featuring in these environmental negotiations.

In this spirit, I attended today’s U.S. Center science presentation on “Coral Reefs and Climate Change: the link between reef resilience and human well-being“.

By Angel Hsu and Christopher Kieran
A group of Yale Forestry and Environmental Studies graduate students are following the Chinese negotiations team over the two weeks. These posts are originally being featured on Green Leap Forward and also cross-posted on Climateprogress.org and the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy’s blog.
The China Information and Communication Center (中国新闻与交流中心) held an unpublicized press briefing featuring Su Wei (pictured center of panel), China’s lead negotiator and Director-General of the NDRC’s Department of Climate Change. While mainly consisting of reporters, the event was open to anyone – well, just about any one of 50 people with their ear to the ground who managed to squeeze in early before crowds more were turned away. We were two of the lucky few who successfully navigated to the quiet back corner of the Bella Center, near the Chinese delegation’s offices, where the briefing took place. The briefing also came after China and the G-77 delegations canceled their press conferences this afternoon, only to restage them later in the day, supposedly in response to some controversy over leaked Danish draft text. But more on this later.

A group of Yale Forestry and Environmental Studies graduate students are following the Chinese negotiations team over the two weeks. These posts are originally being featured on Green Leap Forward and also cross-posted on Climateprogress.org and the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy’s blog.

Angel Hsu is a Doctoral Student at Yale University, focusing on Chinese environmental performance measurement, policy and governance.  Prior to Yale, she worked in the Climate Change and Energy Program at the World Resources Institute, a Washington-based environmental think-tank.  There,she managed the GHG Protocol’s projects in China, which focused on capacity-building on greenhouse gas accounting and reporting standards for Chinese government and businesses…

this should give you the feel of the Bella Center, the home of the UN’s 15th Conference of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol in Copenhagen, Denmark…

Yale has a strong representation at the COP15 talks in Copenhagen. F&ES students will post their observations from the conference here in the blog, and Yale Environment 360 will have frequent reports as well…

Some of the most productive events we attended were actually social events.

For instance, I made some great contacts at the NGO party hosted at Tuba Klub on Saturday December 6. Imagine all the non-profit organizations working on global warming and sustainable development – Greenpeace, World Business Council for Sustainable Development, 350.org, Conservation International – all on one dance floor. Fascinating! Not only did I meet a student at Oxford studying climate change adaptation in the tourism sector, my exact paper topic for Professor Bailis’s class this fall, but I also bumped into a veritable climate celeb – the man himself, Executive Secretariat of the Conference of the Parties, Yvo de Boer! He was very approachable, and answered a few questions I posed. I told him I was a…

This statement, paraphrased to describe the 14th Conference of the Parties at Poznan by Margareta Wahlstrom, the newly appointed Assistant Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction was followed by an essential question: are we waiting with anticipation or are we waiting with foreboding?

Until as recently as 5 hours ago, I would have said the general sense was of foreboding. A sense of foreboding that originates from considering the issues that we are currently facing, such as the lack of political leverage at many levels, the prejudice and difficulty in communication across topics, sectors and regions, the lack of information regarding cost-benefit analysis, the limited resources and institutional capacity at the local sites and the unclear financial mechanisms –along with the problems already mentioned in previous comments within this blog. Additionally, we…