Once again Parties are waiting for what seems like forever in Plenary 2 for the COP to begin. It should be working on the texts forwarded from the LCA, which finally held its closing session between 4 and 7am this morning after an all night session. Texts from the LCA were officially finalized and forwarded to be taken up by the COP.

The main hold up last night appeared to revolve around US objections to paragraph 12 of the Chair’s text which read:
“Developed country Parties shall undertake, individually or jointly, legally-binding nationally appropriate mitigation commitments or actions, [including] [expressed as] quantified economy-wide emissions reduction objectives with a view to reducing the collective greenhouse gas emissions of developed country Parties by at least [25-40] [in the order of 30]…

We have finally made progress. Hot off the press, here is the final text of the Copenhagen COP agreement.

Financing
[to be determined at COP 16]

Adaptation
[to be determined at COP 16]

Binding commitments
[Yes][No][we give up][not before you][you first][bugger off][......to be determined at COP 16]

**************
After an anticlimactic all-night negotiating session last night, which decreased agreement over the LCA text rather than increasing it, and a highly eventful morning, all hope of something coming from this process seems to have been lost. This defeat is now enshrined in the current version of the text, where the simple statement “to be determined at COP 16″ is some of the only unbracketed text. That things have reached this point is tragic, and a completely lost…

I just ran into senator John Kerry as he walked from one event to another. He’s giving a talk at 1:15 entitled “The Critical Role of a global Deal in Advancing U.S Legislation.”
He’s almost always followed by a parade of cameras, journalists, and delegates…

By Angel Hsu and Luke Bassett, part of ‘Team China’ tracking the Chinese delegation a the Copenhagen climate negotiations. These posts are originally being featured on Green Leap Forward and also cross-posted on Climateprogress.org and the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy blog.

Both Team China and Copenhagen are under the weather as a wet snowfall hit in the early afternoon.  We are starting to feel the palpable stress of country delegations to remove brackets and whittle down the negotiating text in preparation for the high-level ministerial meetings on Dec. 17-18, when 110 heads of states will participate. Additionally, the Bella Center…

Here in the LCA Plenary hall, waiting for what should be the final meeting of the LCA to begin, originally scheduled for 7-9pm this evening. Many NGOs have gone home but there are still easily over 150 people in the room. A Swedish Youth NGO is trying to lead Parties in a sing-song and the head of the Ghanaian delegation behind me is waving a plastic wand and muttering about a COP15-bis.

Apparently the issue revolves around language on developed country mitigation in the Chair’s text. This was in the original version released on Friday, but was taken out and replaced with a placeholder in the version from this morning. The Chair re-inserted it tonight after protests from developing countries and not receiving any political guidance from the ministerial…

During the course of the semester, I have been studying various aspects of REDD with my pod. Since being at the COP, I have attended a number of side-events on REDD implementation, but have not been incredibly impressed with their content. Today I attended a side-event hosted by World Resources Institute (WRI) which tied into some of the research I have recently been doing on Readiness Preparation Proposals (R-PPs) mandated by the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) under the umbrella of the World Bank. R-PPs include detailed assessments of the drivers of deforestation and degradation, terms of reference for defining their baseline emissions levels, and plans to establish an MRV system. The side event hosted by WRI spotlighted Guyana, a country that is taking action, having completed its R-PP and…

I have been following the progress of negotiations on the Kyoto protocol. Although calling it “progress” might be too generous. After hours of deliberating, the parties’ positions are so distant and entrenched that a fleet of bulldozers would be needed to bring them any closer. Oh, and we have until tonight to reach an agreement. How can anything be agreed when the developing countries want to make second commitment period targets conditional upon legally-binding, economy-wide commitments by the US? (We know how likely that is.) When no one knows what to do about the “hot air” undermining Kyoto’s already fraught environmental integrity. When you can hear the fragile truce between G77 and the developed countries strain ominously each time Japan declares that having two climate change agreements operating concurrently is…

In the last session of the ‘Development and Climate day’ that was organized by IIED, three high-level panelists – President Nasheed of Maldives, Hon. Batilda Burian, Tanzania’s Minister for Environment, and Hon. Charity Ngilu, Kenya’s Minister of Water and Irrigation – told the audience what the most vulnerable countries want from the Copenhagen negotiations.

President Nasheed wants the international community to “STOP TALKING”. For the last fourteen years experts have been negotiating a common ground – to no avail. He called for the global community to do start acting! President Nasheed said his country has taken a lead by declaring emissions cut that would make Maldives carbon neutral within the next 10 years. He advocated for adaptation measures that use softer, viable, and cheaper methods as hard engineering has…

As you all know, Copenhagen talks were held up all day yesterday because of the position of the LDCs and Africa Group that they wanted the Kyoto Protocol track resolved before continuing under the LCA. After a long-delayed plenary session in which COP President Connie Hedegaard emphasized the commitment to transparency, openness and due process, Parties agreed to resume negotiations in the late afternoon through a series of Ministerial consultations on particular sticking points, in particular:

- Annex 1 commitments under the Kyoto Protocol (it was KEY for developing countries, concerned that the KP will expire and be collapsed into the LCA track, that this be taken up first)

- Long-term financing for mitigation and adaptation

- Long term term emission reduction goal, its relation to sustainable…

By Angel Hsu and Luke Bassett, part of ‘Team China’ tracking the Chinese delegation a the Copenhagen climate negotiations. These posts are originally being featured on Green Leap Forward and also cross-posted on Climateprogress.org and the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy blog.

Our fingers have finally thawed out after waiting two hours outside the Bella Center (can you spot us in the picture to the right?)- the nexus of COP activity, so that we are be able to bring you the latest updates on China in Copenhagen.  The weekend proved slow for the COP, owing much to the distraction