Is technology the solution?

The World Parks Congress (WCP) in Sydney has come to an end with a closing ceremony that focused on several main themes: integrating indigenous communities into the decision making processes; recognizing park rangers for their work at the front line of conservation; involving the youth of the world to lead the future of parks, people and the planet; and learning the art of story telling to inspire larger audiences to support conservation. These messages are primary aspects of the Promise of Sydney, which is “the blueprint for a decade of change coming from the deliberations of this World Parks Congress.” It is now up to the delegates and the rest of the conservation community to go back to their countries and “save the world.”

But saving the…

Did the World Parks Congress reach conservation goals?

The World Parks Congress (WPC) divided the categories of Parks and Protected Areas into 8 different ‘Streams’. Out of these, the most relevant to me was Stream 1: Reaching Conservation Goals. The aim of this stream was to demonstrate that a well-planned and effectively managed protected area system is essential to conservation.

On the final day, the session summarized all that had taken place over the week including key solutions that came out of the 53 sessions held. The concerns and threats that gained attention throughout the Congress and recommendations for addressing them were then contributed to a document titled “The Promise of Sydney”. This will be presented as a final report to governments, NGOs, businesses, extractive industries, and representatives from other sectors…

Think Global, Act Local - Sydney's Parks

Greetings from outside of Sydney Olympic Park!

The event organizers, in their great wisdom, realized that even the most determined of us congress-goers  can’t spend eight straight days in windowless rooms without going stir-crazy. Therefore, on Sunday we had the opportunity to take a field trip and see how local parks are addressing the global themes of the congress, from ‘reaching conservation goals’ to ‘inspiring a new generation.’  Options ranged from whale-watching to cruising up the Hawkesbury River to visiting the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. While presenters and panelists at the congress had already discussed and debated many methods and strategies for conservation, here was our opportunity to see them being implemented on the ground. Four of us opted for the trip titled ‘Think Global, Act Local,’…

Guilford's Coastal Resilience Plan

Guilford’s Coastal Resilience Plan

UEDLAB SEaside plans

UEDLAB flood plans

GUILFORD PUBLIC MEETING
COMMUNITY COASTAL RESILIENCE PLAN TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2014 @ 7:30pm

Nathanael Green Community Center 32 Church Street, Guilford, CT
Please join us for a review of the Guilford Community Coastal Resilience plan as we seek adoption to the Town’s Plan of Conservation and Development (PoCD).
The plan seeks to proactively address coastal challenges to ensure a thriving coastal community that protects neighborhoods, ensures public safety, and creates opportunities for citizens and
communities to work together…

Lee White delivers powerful presentation in Saturday’s double session about the need for concerted efforts and strong political support to effectively combat poaching. Photo by Linda Holcombe

Today the Yale F&ES student delegation to the 6th World Parks Congress in Sydney, Australia had the opportunity to sit in on a paneled debate among world leaders on “The Nature of Crime”, wildlife crime and enforcement.

On the panel:

Shifting the Way the World Shops

If you are what you eat, then just as true, you are what you buy.

From organic, fair-trade, responsible palm oil, Wildlife Friendly, and most recently deforestation-free, consumers can cast their lot with a variety of eco-friendly labels and define who they are by what they buy. It gives someone in New York City the chance to contribute to forest protection in Indonesia by using their wallets to influence the sustainability of the supply chain that serves them with goods.

The consumer’s role cannot be underestimated; conscious consumers can help to shift the social norms and support responsible supply of agricultural or forest products. To get sustainability into the mainstream, the world needs to shift its shopping habits, minimizing environmental damage, and taking the environmental costs of the…

Learning, celebrating, and asking at the World Parks Congress

 

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We are all students here at the World Parks Congress.

We are all here with a joint mission and shared worldview – that we need nature, and nature needs us. And, ultimately, we are here to learn from each others’ experiences with the hope that we can make the world a better place. The community of practitioners, scientists, and world leaders at the World Parks Congress bring diverse skills, experiences, and knowledge to the table.  Through collaboration and engagement, we hope to find solutions to shared problems and conservation outcomes that benefit both nature and people.

We know what the challenges are. We know how to solve the problems we face. But something stands in our way.  In our…

Our People.  Our Ocean.  Our Climate.  A Call to Action.

“First I would like to first recognize the traditional owners of this land—the Eora people—and their ancestral leaders past and present.” So begins almost every talk at the World Park’s Congress—a nod to the way things once were. I too nod to the traditional owners of this land. And to the traditional voyagers of the sea.

On Wednesday morning, four beautiful Vaka’s—traditional Polynesian canoes—sailed into Darling Harbor in Sydney, Australia to kick off the World Parks Congress. They have been sailing for months now, navigating by the stars as they traverse the globe, carrying a message, a call to action—

—our climate is changing, seas are rising, oceans are warming and acidifying, the world is netting too many fish, storms are intensifying and eroding coasts as they crash…

Musings from Week One of the World Parks Congress

1. Australia’s declared War on Feral Cats

A war was declared this week on Australia’s booming feral cat population.  It is believed that there are more than 15 million feral cats in the country killing an estimated 75 million native animals each night across the country.  Australia’s new declaration shows the governments commitment towards keeping nature and wildlife safe from the proclaimed invaders. Mr. Gregory Andrews, Australian Threatened Species Commissioner, spoke with conviction at Friday morning’s opening plenary on Parks about his government’s new financial commitments to challenge this problem.  He hopes this new commitment will restore native bird populations across the country.  It was nice to hear tangible commitments and achievable actions from a government agency.  I believe it’s the small, doable actions that have a far greater…