Professional Skills Courses at F&ES

To follow up on my post last week about one-time Technical Skills Modules, I thought I’d go ahead and tell you a little bit more about the opportunity to learn professional skills here at F&ES through one-credit courses offered each semester that aim to teach us about skills we might need in our future careers. These courses, known as Professional Skills Courses, or PSCs, here on campus, usually meet once a week during the evening, and are often taught by professionals in the field, rather than professors at the university.

This semester I’m taking a PSC taught by Kris Morico, a Global Leader of several Corporate Environmental Programs at General Electric Co., with a background in environmental engineering. The course, titled “Foundations of Environmental Leadership and Management,” is an…

This past Thursday evening, I was fortunate to be in the audience of Dean Crane’s leadership seminar, live-tweeting the week’s eminent guest, former F&ES Dean Gus Speth. I had gone to see him give a lecture before, back in 2012 while I was a senior in college, while he was on tour promoting his book Bridge At the End Of the World. Since then, he has continued on the path that many consider “radical,” advocating for a metamorphosis of our current consumerist economy into something that will work toward, not against, a sustainable future. Those in attendance were extremely enthusiastic to have our former dean back at Yale; for those who saw our F&ES’ers at the Climate March, our t-shirts actually had his face on them!…

Simon Queenborough - Connecting New Haven to the Tropics

The recent addition of Simon Queenborough to the F&ES faculty team is a major windfall for current and future students here at the School of Forestry.  In addition to his new position as lecturer and researcher at F&ES, Dr. Queenborough has come on board as the new director of the Tropical Resources Institute.  This diversity of roles means that students with a variety of backgrounds and interests will have the opportunity to interact with and learn from this dynamic new instructor.

This spring, Dr. Queenborough will kick off his course offerings with an introduction to tropical ecology.  As a field-based course, it will spend the two weeks of spring break in the tropics, where students will benefit directly from Dr. Queenborough’s extensive field experience and interactive…

BULLDOG SUSTAINABILITY LEADS FIRST “BIKE TO THE BOWL”

This past Saturday, I attended my first Yale sporting event. I watched Yale Football celebrate a 49-43 win over Army, one of its greatest non-league rivals. The game was exciting from start to finish – it began with four West Point cadets jumping from a helicopter high above to deliver the game ball and ended with Yale senior Tyler Varga’s fifth touchdown in overtime.

Another highlight of the day was the inaugural “Bike to the Bowl,” organized by Bulldog Sustainability. First year Forester Matt Viens and Yale College student Chris Bowman led the approximately two mile bike ride from Payne Whitney Gym to

Yale FES students Danielle Lehle, Tristanne Davis, and Julia Luthringer marching for climate through Times Square. Photo by Pilipp Arndt.

This past Sunday was a big day for environmentalists, as people gathered in city centers across the globe to raise awareness for the growing need for management and policy that accounts for anthropogenic climate change. I was lucky enough to be at the march in New York City, along with a handful of other F&ES students, and walked in solidarity with over 300,000 other people demanding action be taken on the climate crisis. The event has since been monikered “The Largest Climate March in History,” and has been covered by most of the world’s high-profile news agencies.

As I was standing at 70th Street, between skyscrapers and the park, singing and chanting with other F&ES students, and meeting Yale Alums (who upon seeing our large hand-painted signs, would come…

LET ME INTRODUCE MYSELF . . .

Hello! My name is Anne Haas and I am excited to be joining the admissions team! I am a joint Master of Environmental Management (MEM)/law (JD) student with Pace Law School. I am particularly interested in ecosystem conservation and management, ocean law and policy, and endangered species.

I am originally from the Southern Maine Coast; I spent many childhood summers exploring tide pools, building sand castles, and braving the cold ocean water. After high school, I traded the Atlantic Ocean for the Great Lakes. I attended Lake Forest College just north of Chicago where I majored in environmental studies and French and minored in biology. College provided a number of new and exciting experiences: I studied abroad in

National Geographic: F&ES Grad Discusses China's Role in the Ivory Trade

Before graduating from F&ES last month, Gao Yufang M.E.Sc. ’14 focused his studies on the global ivory trade, with an emphasis on the complex role of his native China.

Gao — who will return to China this month, along with two African conservationists, to explore the country’s ivory markets — recently spoke with National Geographic about the complexities of the ivory market and the role of young people in curbing the slaughter of Africa’s elephants.

He also talks about why he decided to focus on this issue in the first place.

When I came to Yale in September 2012, everyone was talking about ivory trade. As a Chinese in the U.S. who understood how the conservation community in China works, I was seeing a great gap…

Anastas: 'An Important Positive Step by EPA and President Obama'

Two years ago, Paul Anastas returned to Yale after a stint with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where he served as Assistant Administrator for the Office of Research and Development.

So when the EPA today unveiled a new plan to curb carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants, it was particularly meaningful for Anastas, a professor of chemistry at F&ES and director of the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering.

In one of the most significant climate policy initiatives in U.S. history, the EPA introduced a draft rule that officials say would cut carbon dioxide emissions from existing coal plants by as much as 30 percent by 2030, compared with 2005 levels.

In a statement, Anastas called it “a great day for our children…