Help Wanted for Project Linking Ecologists and Designers in Baltimore

The Baltimore Earth Stewardship Initiative (ESI), a Yale-led project that aims to strengthen the role of ecologists in urban planning design, is looking for graduate research fellows and assistants to help coordinate and run a large-scale demonstration project during the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America (ESA) in August.

The initiative is part of the ESA’s broader stewardship goal to shape pathways to ecological change that enhance ecosystem resilience and human well-being. The Baltimore team will help create a series of installations and workshops at the 100th annual meeting of the ESA, being held Aug. 9 to 14 in Baltimore.
The team is looking for graduate research fellows to serve as leaders, organizers, and “documenters” of the event, as well as research assistants and design students interested…

THE F&ES SUMMER INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE

With only three days of classes remaining this spring, F&ES masters students are preparing to embark on summer internship and research experiences that will take them all over the country, and all over the world. Incoming students often wonder what sort of agencies, organizations, and firms F&ES students intern with and how they go about securing their internship. I hope that sharing my own experience will help to shed some light on this process.

Next month, I will be heading to Apia, Samoa to spend ten weeks interning with the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Program (SPREP). SPREP is an intergovernmental organization charged with the protection and sustainable development of the region’s environment. I will be

The admissions office has been receiving lots of questions from admitted students about specializations within the Masters of Environmental Management Program: Am I required to specialize? What are the benefits? Are there any drawbacks to declaring a specialization? I thought I would take a moment to weigh in.

First and foremost, students are NOT required to specialize. However, MEM students have the option to enroll in any of eight specializations, such as Business and the Environment, Ecosystem Conservation and Management, and Environmental Policy Analysis. For a full list of available specializations, visit our page on the MEM curriculum.

Most specializations require between 18 and 24 credits and share a similar overall structure, consisting of core courses, electives, and a capstone course or project. There is some flexibility…

Creating a more inclusive environment in F&ES: Changing the application to include non-binary gender options

This coming application cycle, The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies has decided to make a small but significant change to the application. This year, applicants to F&ES who do not identify as either male or female (or who might identify as both) will have the opportunity to apply as their preferred gender identity.

Danielle Curtis Dailey, F&ES’s Director of Enrollment Management, comments on the change:  “We believe that it is essential that F&ES builds a diverse student body, in order to train leaders who will tackle the world’s toughest environmental problems. When we think about diversity, it is in the greatest sense of the word – race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, region of origin, interests, and so much more. We constantly strive to make sure that we…

TALKS ON THE WILD SIDE

Guest lectures are an almost daily occurrence at Yale F&ES. This semester, the F&ES course Conservation in Practice: International Perspective, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, and the student interest group, ConBio, are hosting a six-part series called “Talks on the Wild Side”. The series will bring a number of professionals in the field of wildlife and ecosystem conservation to campus on Thursdays throughout the semester.

Last week, Dr. Justina Ray kicked off the series with her talk entitled, Challenges of Species-Level Conservation Policy and Practice. Dr. Ray is the Executive Director and Senior Scientist of Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. As a wildlife biologist, she has studied the community ecology of forest carnivores in Central Africa and is now involved in research and policy related to conservation planning in…

NAVIGATING THE F&ES FINANCIAL AID PROCESS

Attention prospective students! With admissions applications in, it’s time for the next step – applying for financial aid. For most graduate students, finances play a big role in deciding where to apply, and ultimately attend. Sometimes the process can seem daunting, but as someone who’s navigated the process and made it out alive, I hope I can provide some helpful insights.

Most importantly, the deadline to apply for financial aid is February 15 at midnight. Make sure you submit your Financial Aid Application and Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by that date to be considered for financial aid. Yale F&ES’s financial aid application is a relatively simple, one page form you can fill out anytime. You’ll be asked about employment history, assets, and any outside funding you…

With the spring semester underway here at F&ES, I thought I would take a moment to reflect on one of Yale’s more unique practices – the “shopping period”. At the start of each new semester, Yale students are given two weeks to “shop” courses – that is, to visit as many courses as they’d like before officially registering.

As someone who thrives on lists and calendars, I’ll admit it – I was a bit skeptical at first. Arriving on campus without knowing what classes I would be taking was unsettling to say the least. After two years of law school, I was used to registering for courses weeks (if not months) before each new semester. Following

New Year, New Semester

The New Year has begun, and with it so has my first spring semester at F&ES. I spent the holidays with my family in sunny southern California, and coming back to New Haven was a bit shocking, to say the least. Winter has settled in, and those of us on campus are hunkering down in preparation for the big blizzard, which has already arrived and is currently covering Kroon Hall and SageBoy in a chilly blanket of snow.

With the new year comes a slew of new classes to try, professors to meet, and things to do in New Haven, making this transition equal parts exciting and contemplative. In the first two weeks back we shop classes, trying out different courses that we think we might like, and slowly…

Getting Scale (and Context) Right

Imagine standing in a vast grassland, a gently undulating sea of grass underneath a cloudless blue sky. The only sound is the wind howling across the landscape, sending pale yellow stalks rippling in waves. You are tiny, no more significant than one of those blades of grass. This is the Daurian Steppe, the grasslands of eastern Mongolia.

It is the home of the Mongolian gazelle. They roam across an area of 250,000 square kilometers, approximately the size of Oregon. They move continuously across the landscape, following the greening of the grass. However, the location of the best grass changes from year to year, as rainfall patterns vary. A herd of gazelle might visit an area one summer, and not return for ten years. They are nomadic, not migratory. How…

No-Go at the WPC

The topic of no-go on industrial activity was salient at the 2014 World Parks Congress. It came up particularly in reference to conservation of World Heritage Sites, one of the conference’s cross-cutting themes. Natural World Heritage sites are internationally recognized as the world’s ecological jewels. They include the Galapagos Islands, the Grand Canyon, and the Great Barrier Reef, places so treasured they are recognized as having “Outstanding Universal Value” by the UNESCO World Heritage Convention, an international conservation framework ratified by 187 countries. Numbering only 200, they encompass less than 1 percent of the world’s surface and only 10 percent of all protected areas, yet, as one would reasonably expect, their immense ecological and cultural value earns them special designation among protected areas. The World Heritage Committee’s position has long…