Foresters with Talent

I think there’s always a trepidation when beginning to think about returning to school after spending time working, traveling, or taking time off, as there’s a perception that graduate school becomes a vortex of the “all-work and no-play” mindset. While this, to some extent, is a totally true of the F&ES Program, I’ve found that this school supports and encourages social events just as much as it emphasizes academic and professional networking.

Most students here are creative. It makes sense; as environmental professionals and scientists, we’re asked to find new and innovative approaches to help conserve, protect, manage, and use the environment in ways that promote diversity, social justice, and economic prosperity. In this way, our student body is highly diverse in that it brings together thinkers from different…

Photo from La Casa Cultural: The Latino Cultural Center at Yale.

The Latino Cultural Center at Yale works to unify Latinos/as across campus and in the greater New Haven community. The current cultural center has existed since 1977, when La Casa Cultural unified the Puerto Rican and Chicano groups on campus, as well as opened its doors to all Yalie Latinos/as. The center provides a large library of books and resource materials on Latin American subjects, lounges for students to work and gather in, and ESL programs for non-native-English speakers on- and off-campus.

La Casa Cultural invites undergraduate, graduate, and professional students to participate in its events and get involved in the greater community. It serves as a link for Latinos/as across graduate schools, bringing together students from Yale’s Law, Medical, Divinity, and Forestry Schools. The Latino Cultural Center…

The Office of LGBTQ Resources at Yale

The Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Resources on campus works with staff, faculty, and students from all of Yale’s Schools to create a network to learn about Yale’s LGBTQ social, cultural, and academic programs and events. The Office provides many services to students, including online databases of resources for the LGBTQ community, one-on-one meetings with staff members to discuss student life, Roundtables for Queer Leadership for LGBTQ networking on campus, and peer liaisons for first-years on campus.

The Office of LGBTQ Resources also hosts and co-sponsors many LGBTQ themed social and cultural events almost every night of the week. Events on campus range from Queer Meditation and Yoga, to Reel Queer Film Screening, to Queer Tea, to Graduate and Professional Receptions, to dance…

Students gather on Indigenous Peoples' Day (Photo credit: Yale Native American Cultural Center).

In order to help prospective F&ES students gain a better understanding of student life on the Yale campus, we’ve decided to launch a series introducing the bevvy of student centers at the college and university open to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional students. This week, we outline the history and mission of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC).

Yale College graduated its first Native American student, Henry Roe Cloud of the Winnebago Tribe, in 1910. Since that time, the Native American presence has grown significantly on campus, and in 1989 the Association of Native Americans at Yale (ANAAY) was founded with the hopes of attracting more Native American professors and students to share their knowledge of their rich culture and history with the wider Yale audience. The NACC…

Seeing the Forest from the Trees: Yale at the Global Gathering

Technology is not a silver bullet. These words of caution are oft repeated but hard to abide by, especially when we are constantly bombarded with new devices promising to improve how we eat, live and even how we think. The promise of “technology for good” is increasingly prominent in the environmental movement, which is seeking momentum to break the stalemate over international climate change negotiations and worsening environmental degradation.

The challenge then is how to embrace new technology with cautious optimism. One emerging tool for consideration is Global Forest Watch, a satellite-based tool to monitor deforestation in near real time, managed by the World Resources Institute. For three days (October 29-31), civil society experts from around the world are meeting in Bogota, Colombia to…

Liza Comita: representing women in environmental science

It’s no secret that women are under-represented in STEM fields.  The National Science Foundation reports that women comprise just over 40% of graduate students in science and technology.  However, women with a Master’s degree or higher who are actually employed in science or engineering occupations currently comprise only 30% of workers in those fields.  For this reason alone, we are excited to welcome Dr. Liza Comita as an assistant professor of tropical forest management at F&ES.  However, although Dr. Comita is an excellent role model for women pursuing STEM fields, this is far outshined by her depth of knowledge and experience, as well as the opportunities she brings for F&ES students to pursue tropical studies while at Yale.

This spring, Dr. Comita, along with Dr

F&ES Celebrates Diversity with its Annual International TGIF

TGIF (“Thank God I’m a Forester”) is a Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies tradition. The Friday events are hosted by the Forestry Club – a student-run group tasked with organizing FES social functions – and bring foresters together to relax, unwind, and enjoy each other’s company after a week of hard work.

On Friday, the Forestry Club hosted its annual International TGIF – an evening intended to celebrate the School’s diverse student body (roughly 30 percent of F&ES students come from abroad!). Flags and photos adorned Bowers Auditorium and music played while international students prepared dishes from their home countries to share with classmates. Many countries were represented, including Japan, Kenya, Mexico, and Norway –

Gender Equality through Disaster & Climate Change Readiness: from Policy to Practice

Right now marks the middle of the 58th Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York City, the annual taking-stock of Millennium Development Goals as they relate to successes, challenges, and progress for women and girls around the globe. Like many UN events, the annual CSW is two weeks of prepared statements, panel discussions, and working group meetings packed with lofty and generalized language, seemingly perfectly designed to simultaneously aggravate and bore participants.

Last Thursday I was a participant in that process. I spoke at a CSW parallel event put on by the Tzu Chi Foundation, a humanitarian disaster relief organization. I presented on the state of gender equality through a climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction lens, from my perspective as a junior researcher…