A week’s conference just passed. Five days of presentations, discussions, proposals, planning, and relationship building. All in the name of eventually designing a new framework for international forest policy. How did we do?

Where are the trees that we saved from falling? Where the communities whose tenure rights were secured? Did we contribute to increased carbon sequestration and storage? How about clean water provision? Have we helped conserve biodiversity? These are some of the questions floating through my head after a week that—given the format as UN conference—was surprisingly exciting, dynamic, and personal.

The United Nations Forum on Forests is the world’s authoritative platform to develop and decide international forest policy frameworks. Comprised by 197 Member States and situated directly under the Economic and Social Council, the multi-lateral…

Report back from the Yale/IUFRO Side Event

“No one single entity – public or private, domestic or international – can address the challenges facing forests,” said Professor Ben Cashore at the UNFF10 side event Private Sector & Forest Finance on April 11 which was co-organized by Yale University and the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Synergistic and collaborative efforts are needed to embrace the complexity of forest management and to scale up technical and financial support.

An effective future framework for the governance of our world’s forests is not possible without substantial involvement from the private sector. Similar statements can increasingly be heard at conferences concerning climate change, sustainable development, and forests. Funding schemes like the Green Climate Fund or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation…