Student and Family; A few things to consider

We are fortunate that our students bring with them a varied list of characteristics that describe them and for many this list includes parent and spouse. Below are a few suggestions that current students who are in this capacity have offered.

 

  • “First of all I would recommend the graduate housing on Prospect.  I don’t live there myself but wish I did.  Mostly families, lots of kids and toys in the yard.”  Check http://gradhousing.yale.edu for more information.

 

  •  “In the case of international students coming in with their spouses and kids it is critical for the non-English speaking parents to get to know one another as soon as possible, ideally prior to MODS during which the spouses are basically abandoned.”  There are additional
Joint Law: To be or not to be?

Here at the Admissions Office, we have begun to notify people of their acceptance to FES.  It’s so exciting!  I love to call newly accepted students and ask them if they have any questions about the program — about classes, professors, or life in New Haven, bikes — anything at all.  And people have many questions, from obtaining research assistantships to finding roommates and an ideal apartment in East Rock.  One question that people frequently ask, though, is whether they can begin a joint degree after they start at F&ES.  Depending on the joint program, the answer may be a bit complicated.  Since I am a joint degree student, I will give you the run-down on the program with Pace Law School.

 

Pace Law School offers incredible…

CEID: A Hidden Gem

When I left Yale in May 2012, the first floor of Becton Engineering Center was home to the engineering library. Upon returning to Yale in fall 2013, an amazing new space had popped up in its place!

When you walk inside, you’ll find that Becton is now home to the Yale Center for Engineering Innovation and Design (CEID), a space for students and faculty to learn, create, and share. According to the CEID website, the CEID is a whole of many parts:

  • A Physical Space: The CEID gives students and faculty tools and resources for classes, design projects, and collaboration.
  • A Bustle of Activity: The CEID hosts engineering design courses, workshops, lectures, networking events, and exhibitions.
  • A Diverse Community: Students, both undergraduate and graduate
Who is Eli Fenichel?

Dr. Eli Fenichel is one of the more recent additions to the Yale FES cadre of faculty.  An assistant professor of bioeconomics and ecosystem management, Dr. Fenichel joined us in the fall of 2012 from Arizona State University.  His background in wildlife ecology, agricultural economics, and resource and environmental economics has enabled him to bring a unique and valuable perspective to dynamic common pool resource problems.  I had the opportunity to sit down with him this week to talk about his research, teaching philosophy, and tips for making the most of your experience here at F&ES.

Dr. Fenichel works at the interface of ecology and economics with applied math.  His research applies capital theory to natural resources.  He investigates how to make better decisions with natural resources…

Joint Degree Transition: Back at F&ES!

“Wait, so you’re not getting your law degree?” “You’re a second year law student, but you’re not graduating for another two years?” No, and yes. As a joint degree student, I have fielded many questions and needed to alleviate confusion for prospective employers and classmates alike. The F&ES joint degree program with Pace Law, Vermont Law, and Yale Law is indeed unique. It condenses the three-year law program and two-year master’s program into four years. Intending to enroll in the joint program from the start, I completed two years at Pace Law School before starting one year at F&ES. This year, my final year of the joint program, I spent the fall semester at Pace and am spending this balmy spring semester at Yale.

Transitioning to F&ES from Pace is complicated, but let me…

F&ESers on the Ground: Sochi Style

Hello from Sochi! For the past 10 days, I’ve been in Russia working on an F&ES project with four other amazing graduate students, teammates, and friends. I’m here with Diana Madson, Taylor Rees, Bo Uuganbayar, and Tom Owens. You might remember this story from Bo’s blog post back in November, Winter is Coming to Westeros. For a quick recap, we all took a class together last semester, International Organizations & Conferences, and developed an amazing project idea to partner with Olympians to bring the climate change conversation to the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. Since September, the five of us have been working to do just that. We’ve been interviewing athletes, writing blog posts, connecting with mainstream media, and crafting a narrative to best deliver this story. From this…

Sterling Memorial Library, home to the stacks.

In the Fall of 2010 I began at the Yale School of Public Health and that following spring I applied and was accepted to Yale F&ES.

From the moment I was admitted I felt like family. I went up to Admitted Students Day in the spring to test the waters of the F&ES community. I was surprised by the openness and honesty of the current students and faculty, and I was astounded by the breadth of and depth of the other admitted students who would become my future classmates. Admitted students even got to stay for the T.G.I.F. (Thank God I’m A Forester), a long tradition of good beer and good friends, sometimes themed.

That summer I shipped…

The road named after my family - where my grandparents first farm was in Monmouth, Oregon.


Happy New Year everyone! Congrats to everyone who finished their applications and may be attending grad school in 2014! Many of you have asked me during our prospective student online chats and through emails why I decided to come to F&ES, how the experience was, and what it was like to do a Joint Degree.

As you may have read, I’m originally from Salem, Oregon [west coast!]. My grandparents owned a tree farm in Monmouth, Oregon and my brother and I grew up playing in the woods and in the ponds. I did my undergraduate work at the University of Oregon and graduated in 2007 with a degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing and a minor in Environmental Studies. I had originally intended to…

Extra! Extra! Read All About It!

Hey again! I hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season. I was able to spend time with family in California and with friends in Colorado and New Hampshire. It was a great break, but I’m excited to be getting back into the swing of things here at FES. Spring semester is ramping up with exciting new classes and opportunities.

As the semester starts, you might be wondering how to get involved, stay involved, or even just stay informed. I’d like to draw your attention to several of the different publications at FES. For a comprehensive list, you can check out this website. I had the opportunity to chat with several different people working on four very interesting ventures. I’ll be highlighting four of FES’s publications and projects…

New Haven, my home!

It is no secret that I’m New Haven’s biggest fan. There is so much delicious food, art, beauty, and fun packed in this small city that I think it is truly such a wonderful place to be a grad student and live. We may not have sunny California’s steady weather, but we do have incredible seasons and get to experience the best of each. A little snow just makes us tougher, you know?

Anyway, before the offices closes for the holiday season, I just wanted to share this really cute video that some Yale undergrads made. I think it is pretty clever, but it also goes to show you how fond other people are of this place, besides me!

To watch on YouTube, click here