Welcome Rachel!

Hello prospective students! 

My name is Rachel Ett, and I’m an MEM5 student at Yale F&ES. I went to Yale College as an undergraduate, took one “gap year” to work, and now I’m back for my “fifth year” as an MEM student. I will graduate in May with the class of 2016.

More about me: I’m from South Carolina and a true southerner at heart! I majored in Environmental Studies at Yale College, and during my gap year before F&ES I worked at a start-up event planning company in Brooklyn and at NRG Energy, a Fortune 200 energy company, in Houston. Taking a year off before coming back to graduate school was extremely valuable to me. I was able to narrow my academic focus

Dia de los Muertos celebration at F&ES, November 2015. Photo by Adrien Salazar.

The Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Committee at the School of Forestry is a group of students, faculty, and staff committed to cultivating an inclusive atmosphere at FES, challenging systems of oppression, and fostering a space where a diversity of ideas, values, and perspectives are welcomed and respected.

This year the committee is excited to put on cultural celebrations, community dialogues, and workshops to enhance the role of the School of Forestry in developing culturally competent leaders and driving the discourse of diversity and equity in the environmental field.

Now Accepting Applications!

My name is Uma Bhandaram and I’m excited to be joining the Admissions Department as the new Recruiter for the 2015 – 2016 season. Mainly because this means I don’t have to leave F&ES or New Haven yet! I’ve had such a great time here.

First, a little bit about me: I’m from Southern California. I completed my undergraduate degree at University of California, Los Angeles in 2011. Afterwards, I worked as an environmental consultant in Southern California for a year and a half, interned for a reforestation agency in Haiti for a few months, and traveled around Central and South America for a couple of months before heading to Yale. I’ve grown up and lived in various areas surrounded by the beach, mountains, and desert and, most distinctly…

NatGeo Adventures: An FESer hard at work

Kevin McLean, who is working toward his Ph.D. at F&ES, was featured recently on National Geographic’s “Adventure 5” website, a weekly series in which they ask their adventure friends to share some of their favorite terms for their favorite activities.

McLean wrote about the experience on his blog.

“A few weeks ago I went down to the National Geographic headquarters in DC and had a chance to participate in their Adventure 5 series. They asked a bunch of their Explorers from different fields to explain some of the lingo they use. Their studio was really amazing, I wish I would have taken a picture. They had teleprompter to the side of the camera that made the interviewer’s eyes float right in front of the lens. This ‘mirror mirror…


With only three days of classes remaining this spring, F&ES masters students are preparing to embark on summer internship and research experiences that will take them all over the country, and all over the world. Incoming students often wonder what sort of agencies, organizations, and firms F&ES students intern with and how they go about securing their internship. I hope that sharing my own experience will help to shed some light on this process.

Next month, I will be heading to Apia, Samoa to spend ten weeks interning with the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Program (SPREP). SPREP is an intergovernmental organization charged with the protection and sustainable development of the region’s environment. I will be

Admitted Student Open House

Last week, the Office of Admissions hosted over 100 admitted students (admits) at F&ES for our annual Admitted Students Open House. Many admits were accommodated by current students, and all were invited to a number of events, including panel discussions with current students and faculty, chats with students of certain disciplines, meetings with professors, and talks presented by F&ES’s support staff on financial aid, preparing to move to New Haven, and understanding more about the program generally. I, personally, had the pleasure of meeting many admits I’ve been corresponding with for the past couple of months and having a conversation face-to-face.

Most of the day’s events were broadcast live from Burke Auditorium in Kroon Hall, so that students unable to attend the orientation were able to watch from…

The admissions office has been receiving lots of questions from admitted students about specializations within the Masters of Environmental Management Program: Am I required to specialize? What are the benefits? Are there any drawbacks to declaring a specialization? I thought I would take a moment to weigh in.

First and foremost, students are NOT required to specialize. However, MEM students have the option to enroll in any of eight specializations, such as Business and the Environment, Ecosystem Conservation and Management, and Environmental Policy Analysis. For a full list of available specializations, visit our page on the MEM curriculum.

Most specializations require between 18 and 24 credits and share a similar overall structure, consisting of core courses, electives, and a capstone course or project. There is some flexibility…

F&ES Explores the Caribbean

This spring break, I traveled to St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands for the course FES 729b: Caribbean Coastal Development: Cesium and CZM taught by faculty members Gaboury Benoit and Mary Beth Decker.

Creating a more inclusive environment in F&ES: Changing the application to include non-binary gender options

This coming application cycle, The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies has decided to make a small but significant change to the application. This year, applicants to F&ES who do not identify as either male or female (or who might identify as both) will have the opportunity to apply as their preferred gender identity.

Danielle Curtis Dailey, F&ES’s Director of Enrollment Management, comments on the change:  “We believe that it is essential that F&ES builds a diverse student body, in order to train leaders who will tackle the world’s toughest environmental problems. When we think about diversity, it is in the greatest sense of the word – race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, region of origin, interests, and so much more. We constantly strive to make sure that we…