HELLO FROM STUDENT ASSISTANT, DAVID E. MCCARTHY

HELLO FROM STUDENT ASSISTANT, DAVID E. MCCARTHY

Hello, my name is David McCarthy, and I am a student worker with F&ES’s Office of Admissions. I’d to take a moment to reach out, introduce myself, and share my F&ES experience.

A little about me:

I am a lifelong Connecticut resident and have I’ve been living in New Haven since 2008.  So, feel free to ask me anything about New England, CT or New Haven. I am a second-year Masters of Environmental Management (MEM) student. The MEM program is the largest program.  It’s sort of a – what do you want to do in the world of environmentalism, and here are the tools to get you there – kind of program.  While there are formal specializations, the MEM program…

F&ES / CDO Washington D.C. 2017 job trek

Last week, F&ES’s Career Development Office (CDO) hosted a job trek to Washington D.C., and it was amazing! One hundred graduate students traveled into the nation’s capital to meet with chief environmental organizations. It was an incredible opportunity to be inside their headquarters, meet with their human resources departments, learn about internship and hiring practices, and speak F&ES alumni who live and work in DC.

The trek was very well organized and getting there was easy. Many of us carpooled or took the train. Lodging and accommodations were also easy to find, as many of our gracious alumni offered up their couches and spare bedrooms. I stayed with Theodore Varns, Green Growth Landscapes Program Advisor at The Nature Conservancy. He was very courteous and hospitable, and he provided me…

The Carbon Footprint of Capital

We think of capital, the assets we use in production, as heavy: machines, buildings, infrastructure, trucks and railroads. Being composed mostly of cement and steel, we would expect their production to cause a lot of greenhouse gas emissions. In a new paper, published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, we offer a first detailed analysis of the carbon footprint of gross fixed capital formation across countries and sectors. The picture that emerges is interesting because of some small surprises.

First of all, capital is big. Capital formation constitutes about one-quarter of gross global product in monetary terms. It causes about 30 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Leaving it out is a pretty big oversight.

Second, capital formation varies across countries. The country with the highest capital…