Environmental Impacts of Demand-Side Technologies and Strategies for Carbon Mitigation

Energy efficiency and renewable energy are widely recognized as two of the most effective ways to greatly reduce the threat of climate change. But how much do we know about other environmental impacts of a large-scale deployment of these technologies? What are the benefits (or impacts) from a life-cycle perspective? By how much can the gains from energy efficient technologies be multiplied if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity production are also reduced?

CFL w vineIn a special issue, Yale’s Journal of Industrial Ecology aims to advance our understanding of environmental and natural resource implications of energy efficiency technologies. This special issue, “Environmental Impacts of Demand-Side Technologies and Strategies for Carbon Mitigation,” was prepared…

The 2016 Environmental Film Festival at Yale

This April, Yale students came together to voluntarily run one of the largest film festivals across the country. The Environmental Film Festival at Yale, or more lovingly called EFFY by Yale students in the know, ran from April 1-9, screened over 20 short- and feature-length films.

The event is run mainly by students from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies who work throughout the year to provide relevant environmental stories from around the world to the greater New Haven area. Most films are followed by a panel discussion led by academic leaders from Yale, filmmakers, and stars of the films.

The 2016 was a great success, and students, staff, and faculty from across Yale, as well as New Haven community members came out to support…

F&ESers Find City Climate Action Plans Are Missing an Important Piece

An F&ES student and recent alum recently published an article in The Nature of Cities, based on research done at Yale as part of the COP21 Fellowship. The research, by Emily Wier ’17 M.E.M. and Alisa Zomer ’14 M.E.M., found that even though cities pledge to reduce emissions and fight climate change, the commitments don’t measure up.

Some cities are getting it right. After Oakland’s Energy and Climate Change Action Plan was implemented in 2012, the city’s transportation emissions decreased slightly. Other cities that integrated transportation and land use planning in their climate plans, including Atlanta, Georgia and Columbus, Ohio, also reduced their transportation emissions.

Other cities are not doing as well. Transport-related emissions increased by around 18 percent in Boulder, Colorado and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania after they implemented…