Yale SAF Christmas Tree Harvest and Sale

It’s the most wonderful time of the year. A time when young foresters, aided by friends, significant others, and curious onlookers, caravan north to Yale-Myers Forest to harvest trees, spruce boughs, mountain laurel, and winterberry. Every year, in early December, we take a break from the final weeks of classes to harvest Christmas trees and wreath-making materials at Yale-Myers and return to Yale with trucks overflowing with holiday cheer.

This year, we harvested the trees during the day on a Friday and gathered at Yale Farm that night to eat pizza, drink hot cider, and assemble wreathes by a roaring fire. For the past two weekends, we sold trees and wreathes to fellow students, faculty, and members of the New Haven community, raising funds for the Yale student chapter…

Water and Climate Change: Are Humans Prepared to Adapt to Growing Challenge?

The link between water and climate change is palpable, yet it had never been addressed during a meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) until this year in Morocco. On this occasion, an entire day — fostered by the Moroccan Kingdom — was dedicated to water. But water is still not an important part of global climate negotiations. Although it is included in the “Nairobi Work Programme” — formed in 2005 to “facilitate and catalyze” the development and dissemination of information on the impacts, vulnerability and adaptation to climate change — many countries are blocking the inclusion of water because it would mean trans-boundary catchment negotiations, collaboration and planning, and affect sovereignty or geopolitical positions.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recognizes that water is…

Last week, newly released data by the Climate Change Institute from the Arctic confirmed that, yet again, winter temperatures in the North Pole have reached unprecedented highs. This year, the temperature is 36 degrees Fahrenheit above the historic average. This is already greater than what many experts consider a tipping point that could lead to climate and security impacts on a global scale. In the face of a drastically changing climate, it is even more imperative that we as environmentalists not just collect information, but also question how exactly we are contributing to creating a more sustainable future.

This week, a group of concerned students, alumni, faculty, and staff from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Science added their voices to a growing number of environmental…

Watching the events unfold at Standing Rock has felt something like an out-of-body experience. I am seventeen hundred miles away, watching safely from my living room. But every picture and every story that comes out of Standing Rock hits with such impact that the great distance seems negligible.

I am a child of the Dakotas. I was born in North Dakota. I spent almost every holiday and summer in the Badlands of North Dakota, or with family in the Black Hills of South Dakota. When I was young, my family moved to the prairies of Saskatchewan, Canada, but we stayed close, just a few miles above the border. My childhood memories of the Dakotas and the Canadian prairies have blended, forming idyllic vignettes of golden sunsets, gorgeous but fierce…

F&ES Treks to Quito, Ecuador

During the October fall break, a group of roughly 30 students from three Yale graduate schools (FES, School of Management, and Public Health) traveled to Quito, Ecuador. The majority of these students were FES-ers, who 1) attended the UN Habitat III conference as accredited stakeholders and 2) either presented research related to urban resilience or participated in a consultancy project.

The UN Habitat III conference was a unique occurrence. It is an event that only happens every 20 years, where national and subnational governments gather to discuss urban development. In this past Habitat, the New Urban Agenda was adopted. This is a guidance document that will dictate how urbanization will occur worldwide, and encompasses many areas including but not limited to social inclusion, ending poverty, environmentally sustainable…

Blue Ridge Mountains - Fall Forestry Field Trip

This October break, 16 MF and MFS students traveled down to the Southern Appalachians for a fall forestry tour that culminated in a two-day MF Alumni Convocation at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, NC. It was a whirlwind of a tour spanning four days, planned by two MF teaching fellows in collaboration with Mike Ferrucci, our forest operations professor. Before the trip, the group met to discuss what to expect on the tour, and the trip leaders shared reading material to provide context for the operations we would see throughout the four days.

We flew into Atlanta and hit the ground running with a visit to a TIMO-managed pine plantation in northern Georgia. We drove further north that day to Hot Springs, NC where the whole group stayed in a rental…

You may have noticed the ofrenda (altar) in Sage Lounge for El Dia de Muertos, (or El Dia de los Muertos) the Day of the Dead. EQUID students invite the FES community to share in this tradition.

During El Dia de Muertos (October 31st- November 2nd) it is said that the veil between the world of the living and the world of the dead is thin. Death is honored as a part of life, and the holiday is seen as a joyous opportunity to be reunited with those who have passed on.

During our formal opening of the altar on November 2nd, staff and students brought the names and memories of loved ones into the space, verbally, tacitly, or with small items placed on the altar. One FESer…

The Yale Food Systems Symposium

One of the great things about being a student at F&ES is that you have the opportunity to step into different worlds, hear new perspectives, and collaborate with your peers and outside experts almost every day of the week. On Friday September 30th, F&ES hosted the Yale Food Systems Symposium (YFSS) in Kroon Hall. The day-long event was planned by a small group of Yale F&ES, School of Management, and Divinity School students, and included speakers, panelists, and workshop facilitators from across the country. Topics included sustainable food systems and innovations in the fields of agriculture, conservation, climate change, food consumption, and urbanization. The theme for this year’s Symposium? Feeding a growing world.

Meet the newest F&ES admissions student assistant

I’m Jolisa Brooks, and I’m delighted to be assisting in the F&ES Admission’s Office. I’m a first year MESc with a research focus in environmental justice, political ecology and peace & conflict. Prior to matriculating to F&ES I was a Legislative Fellow for the US Congressional Committee on Foreign Affairs, where I worked on “Education for All Act 2016, “Women, Peace & Security 2016”, “Power Africa”, and a host of other international development policies. In the short time that I’ve been at Yale I’ve already fallen in love with F&ES and I can’t wait to encourage and assist prospective students in their application journeys.

Last year's Forest Health class visiting the U.S. Forest Service's Quarantine Lab. I'm top row, second from the left,

Hi! My name is Lindsay and I’m one of the new student assistants with the Admissions team at F&ES this year. I’m thrilled to be a part of this dynamic (and fun) group, and I look forward to meeting some of you as you visit and learn more about our school.

I’m a second year Master of Forestry student. The Master of Forestry (MF) program…