F&ES Explores the Caribbean

This spring break, I traveled to St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands for the course FES 729b: Caribbean Coastal Development: Cesium and CZM taught by faculty members Gaboury Benoit and Mary Beth Decker.

Tracking Wildlife in the Yale Woods

At Yale-Myers Forest a few weeks ago, fourth-generation forester and wildlife researcher Sue Morse poked her hiking pole at the yellow stained snow. Bringing the tip of the pole to her mouth, she breathed out to activate the scent molecules. Morse sniffed and said, “If the urine smells like a skunk, it’s a fox.” A fox it was. There, in the snow were delicate nail lines of the print to prove it. As the group huddled to examine the track, she gave us another clue. She drew an “x” between the foot and the toe pads to distinguish this canine track from the “m” shape of a feline.

Despite bitter cold, nine F&ES students joined Morse, of the Vermont-based organization Keeping Track, for a half-day wildlife tracking workshop in…

Creating a more inclusive environment in F&ES: Changing the application to include non-binary gender options

This coming application cycle, The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies has decided to make a small but significant change to the application. This year, applicants to F&ES who do not identify as either male or female (or who might identify as both) will have the opportunity to apply as their preferred gender identity.

Danielle Curtis Dailey, F&ES’s Director of Enrollment Management, comments on the change:  “We believe that it is essential that F&ES builds a diverse student body, in order to train leaders who will tackle the world’s toughest environmental problems. When we think about diversity, it is in the greatest sense of the word – race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, region of origin, interests, and so much more. We constantly strive to make sure that we…