Wait; what's it like to be a forester?

At the end of October, I had the chance to attend the Society of American Foresters (SAF) Conference
in Charleston, South Carolina. As a Master of Environmental Science (MESc) grad, it was fun to hang out with forestry students and alumni and hear about their experiences. I got a chance to sit down with some Master of Forestry (MF) students and hear about their experience on Forest Crew over the summer.

Forest Crew is a program that manages the Yale Forests with oversight by Professor Mark Ashton. Yale owns 10,880 acres of forestland in New England, including the Yale-Myers Forest in northeastern Connecticut. This mixed hardwoods forest is at the heart of the last significant undeveloped area in the DC to Boston metropolis, nicknamed the “Quiet Corner” as it…

Photo: Mariusz Patalan/Climate Centre

On Saturday November 16th was the first day of Development and Climate Days (D&C) at COP19. D&C Days, an extremely participatory event, was hosted by the GEFJICARed Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre (RCCC), IIED and ICCCADI, along with my team partners at Yale, Verner Wilson and Rex Barrer,co-facilitated climate change games at D&C Days. We interned with the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre as a component of the International Organizations and Conference Class that we are taking at at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. In this post I want to share my reflections on how D&C Days, with an innovative conference approach, positively inspired participants to take action on climate change.

At D&C Days the first session of talks was about a diverse range…

Apples branded with the COP 19 logo that were distributed widely at COP-19 by Poland’s Ministry of Environment

From the first day I arrived in Warsaw for the UNFCCC’s 19th Conference of the Parties, there was an atmosphere of cautious excitement surrounding the negotiations on REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation). A week of negotiating had already taken place, resulting in consensus on two contentious technical issues, one of which had led to the breakdown of the REDD+ negotiations at last year’s COP. Agreement on these issues was an enormous accomplishment and, if adopted, would mean that the five major technical elements of the REDD+ framework would be complete. Enthusiasm was reined in, however, by the understanding that these technical elements would be held hostage for a decision on long-term REDD+ finance. It was an all-or-nothing deal: either the package of both technical and finance…