Welcome Rachel!

Hello prospective students! 

My name is Rachel Ett, and I’m an MEM5 student at Yale F&ES. I went to Yale College as an undergraduate, took one “gap year” to work, and now I’m back for my “fifth year” as an MEM student. I will graduate in May with the class of 2016.

More about me: I’m from South Carolina and a true southerner at heart! I majored in Environmental Studies at Yale College, and during my gap year before F&ES I worked at a start-up event planning company in Brooklyn and at NRG Energy, a Fortune 200 energy company, in Houston. Taking a year off before coming back to graduate school was extremely valuable to me. I was able to narrow my academic focus

Dia de los Muertos celebration at F&ES, November 2015. Photo by Adrien Salazar.

The Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Committee at the School of Forestry is a group of students, faculty, and staff committed to cultivating an inclusive atmosphere at FES, challenging systems of oppression, and fostering a space where a diversity of ideas, values, and perspectives are welcomed and respected.

This year the committee is excited to put on cultural celebrations, community dialogues, and workshops to enhance the role of the School of Forestry in developing culturally competent leaders and driving the discourse of diversity and equity in the environmental field.

From Boston to Paris, Less Than 100 Days until COP21

China, “Big Oil,” and cities all emerge as important themes in the lead-up to the climate negotiations (COP-21) in Paris this December. Panelists and experts discussed these topics at a recent forum, Local and Global Climate Action on the Path to Paris, hosted by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and The Christian Science Monitor in Boston. Watch the video here; a quick recap of the event follows:

China. In its INDC (intended nationally determined contribution), China pledged to increase its share of non-fossil fuel energy by 20 percent and to peak coal use by 2030. Valerie Karplus, Assistant Professor at MIT, said that emissions may peak sooner, however, because the economy is slowing. The economic cooling is a double-edged sword because China’s renewable energy sector will feel the…

Roads are For People, Too: PARK(ing) Day Comes to F&ES

On Sept. 19, the F&ES community celebrated PARK(ing) Day, a grassroots initiative that continues to create awareness of the way we use, design, and assign urban public spaces. Current students and alumni filled the two parking spots in front of Kroon Hall with trees provided by the Urban Resources Initiative, flowers from Marsh Botanical Gardens, tables and chairs, and a bike rack. They also drew a temporary crosswalk across Prospect Street. Students, staff, faculty — even Yale President Peter Salovey — took a few moments to enjoy the pop-up communal space.

PARK(ing) Day is part of a larger movement called tactical urbanism. Commonly known as “guerilla” urbanism or “D.I.Y” urbanism, tactical urbanism bypasses the political, complex, and lengthy process of top down city planning and makes small improvements to…

MODs and the Migration Back to New Haven

The third week of school has just ended. Courses are finally (mostly) sorted out, and people are getting back into the swing of F&ES life here on campus. For half of us, we’ve returned from summers interning at various organizations across the country and globe, ready to finish our final year for our masters’ degrees.

The other half of us is new to the school and New Haven. Before classes started, all first years participated in the school’s introductory “summer modules,” or MODs for short. Each week for three weeks, new students take a different class based in different parts of Connecticut. There is an urban MOD, hosted by students in New Haven who study urban planning, water and forestry issues. Another is hosted at Yale-Myers Forest, a Yale-owned…

Commitment, Distraction or Green Fluff? Debating Science-based Corporate Carbon Targets

The environmental movement has always been plagued by the half-a-loaf problem. Is it better to accept a partial solution to an environmental threat with the possibility that the solution will be the sum total of what is achieved? Or should the partial serving be rejected with the opposite possibility that no progress will be made?

This conundrum plays out in a debate in the Journal of Industrial Ecology over science-based carbon targets for business. In “Science-Based Carbon Targets for the Corporate World: The Ultimate Sustainability Commitment, or a Costly Distraction?” two leading voices on corporate sustainability take aim at emerging calls for a move away from arbitrary goals for corporate reduction of greenhouse gases (GHGs). In this approach, companies cut their emissions using targets defined based on a global…

Now Accepting Applications!

My name is Uma Bhandaram and I’m excited to be joining the Admissions Department as the new Recruiter for the 2015 – 2016 season. Mainly because this means I don’t have to leave F&ES or New Haven yet! I’ve had such a great time here.

First, a little bit about me: I’m from Southern California. I completed my undergraduate degree at University of California, Los Angeles in 2011. Afterwards, I worked as an environmental consultant in Southern California for a year and a half, interned for a reforestation agency in Haiti for a few months, and traveled around Central and South America for a couple of months before heading to Yale. I’ve grown up and lived in various areas surrounded by the beach, mountains, and desert and, most distinctly…