F&ES Explores the Caribbean

This spring break, I traveled to St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands for the course FES 729b: Caribbean Coastal Development: Cesium and CZM taught by faculty members Gaboury Benoit and Mary Beth Decker. In this course we studied the effects of land development, management issues, and waste treatment on the health of the overall environment. Below are some photos from our trip:

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Students investigate the rocky intertidal zone near Bovoni Bay.

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We hiked through the mangals to test water and collect sediment samples.

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Creating a more inclusive environment in F&ES: Changing the application to include non-binary gender options

This coming application cycle, The Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies has decided to make a small but significant change to the application. This year, applicants to F&ES who do not identify as either male or female (or who might identify as both) will have the opportunity to apply as their preferred gender identity.

Danielle Curtis Dailey, F&ES’s Director of Enrollment Management, comments on the change:  “We believe that it is essential that F&ES builds a diverse student body, in order to train leaders who will tackle the world’s toughest environmental problems. When we think about diversity, it is in the greatest sense of the word – race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, region of origin, interests, and so much more. We constantly strive to make sure that we…

TALKS ON THE WILD SIDE

Guest lectures are an almost daily occurrence at Yale F&ES. This semester, the F&ES course Conservation in Practice: International Perspective, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, and the student interest group, ConBio, are hosting a six-part series called “Talks on the Wild Side”. The series will bring a number of professionals in the field of wildlife and ecosystem conservation to campus on Thursdays throughout the semester.

Last week, Dr. Justina Ray kicked off the series with her talk entitled, Challenges of Species-Level Conservation Policy and Practice. Dr. Ray is the Executive Director and Senior Scientist of Wildlife Conservation Society Canada. As a wildlife biologist, she has studied the community ecology of forest carnivores in Central Africa and is now involved in research and policy related to conservation planning in…

Research degrees at F&ES

Yale F&ES offers a handful of different types of masters degrees to students seeking to accomplish their academic and professional goals. Two of them, the Masters of Environmental Science (MESc) and the Master of Forest Science (MFS), are similar to typical science degrees that most researchers pursue in order to complete a thesis. For this post, I corresponded with a few first-year science degree-seeking students to understand their experience better, and get a general idea of what a masters of science degree entails here at F&ES.

Many students who are looking to come to F&ES for an MESc or MFS degree tend to ask the same question: why did you choose F&ES over another school?

Paul Burow, a current MESc first-year with a research focus in Native American…

NAVIGATING THE F&ES FINANCIAL AID PROCESS

Attention prospective students! With admissions applications in, it’s time for the next step – applying for financial aid. For most graduate students, finances play a big role in deciding where to apply, and ultimately attend. Sometimes the process can seem daunting, but as someone who’s navigated the process and made it out alive, I hope I can provide some helpful insights.

Most importantly, the deadline to apply for financial aid is February 15 at midnight. Make sure you submit your Financial Aid Application and Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by that date to be considered for financial aid. Yale F&ES’s financial aid application is a relatively simple, one page form you can fill out anytime. You’ll be asked about employment history, assets, and any outside funding you…

With the spring semester underway here at F&ES, I thought I would take a moment to reflect on one of Yale’s more unique practices – the “shopping period”. At the start of each new semester, Yale students are given two weeks to “shop” courses – that is, to visit as many courses as they’d like before officially registering.

As someone who thrives on lists and calendars, I’ll admit it – I was a bit skeptical at first. Arriving on campus without knowing what classes I would be taking was unsettling to say the least. After two years of law school, I was used to registering for courses weeks (if not months) before each new semester. Following

New Year, New Semester

The New Year has begun, and with it so has my first spring semester at F&ES. I spent the holidays with my family in sunny southern California, and coming back to New Haven was a bit shocking, to say the least. Winter has settled in, and those of us on campus are hunkering down in preparation for the big blizzard, which has already arrived and is currently covering Kroon Hall and SageBoy in a chilly blanket of snow.

With the new year comes a slew of new classes to try, professors to meet, and things to do in New Haven, making this transition equal parts exciting and contemplative. In the first two weeks back we shop classes, trying out different courses that we think we might like, and slowly…

A first-timer's take on the UN Climate Change Conference

COP20 in Lima, Peru, was chocked full of politics and tactics, activists and great minds, a mix of frustration and hope— it is hard to process everything that happened. I watched the negotiations as an official observer, a status that afforded me a spot in the negotiating room after extended waits under the baking equatorial sun. Amidst all the activity, viewing the negotiations live was a highlight of my week. The COP20 talks in Lima had two overarching goals:

  1. Get consensus on a draft text to be used in negotiations for a global climate agreement in 2015. This year was all about preparing for the new, legally binding global agreement which will be adopted in Paris in 2015 and implemented in 2020, when the second period of the Kyoto Protocol ends.